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Carbohydrate Blockers - White Kidney Bean Extract

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#1
jjordie

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Always looking for anything new I found this article about white kidney bean extract and wondered if anybody has heard of it or tried it?
I know it is aimed at losing weight but wondered if it would help BGs.
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White Kidney Bean Extract
The key ingredient in these starch-blocker supplements is a natural extract found in the White Kidney Bean (commonly known as ‘Phaseolamin®’), the original interest in which came about when researchers discovered that excessive eating of carbohydrates could cause problems for diabetics as it rushes glucose (a by-product of the breakdown of starch) into the blood stream - Phaseolamin® could potentially curtail this rush.
Phaseolamin® (a non-prescription partial protein) neutralises ‘alpha amylase’ (a starch-digesting enzyme) thus inhibiting it from breaking down the starch into glucose and then fat. This state lasts for approximately an hour, in which time, the majority of the starch that is eaten passes through the digestive system in whole molecule form (in much the same way as indigestible fibre does) therefore limiting the glucose created in the body and ultimately reducing calorie intake.
But the most important thing to remember when taking these White Kidney Bean Extract supplements is that as it only neutralises starch, the Phaseolamin® doesn’t stop the digestion and assimilation of all the other nutrients in starchy foods. The vitamins, minerals, proteins and enzymes are all still absorbed thus leaving you safe to eat and gain the nutritional benefits from pasta, potatoes, bread and other starchy foods without the worry of weight gain.


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#2
jjordie

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As nobody seems to have heard of or tried White Kidney Bean Extract I have been googling for information.
I find that it's mainly promoted for weight-loss purposes and doesn't seem as if proper trials have been done yet.

So I won't be bothering about that for some time :egg:


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T2. Diagnosed February 1995
(Started Metformin October 2006)


Metformin 500mg x 3
Aspirin 75mg x 1
Sotalol 20mg x 2
Thyroxine 175mg
Betahistine 8mg x 3
Gliclazide

Everything makes sense to someone at some time:pcguru:

#3
Cyborg

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A co-worker used the stuff and he swore it works. I haven't tried it personally. :wavey:

#4
seacomp

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Phaseolamin® (a non-prescription partial protein) neutralises ‘alpha amylase’ (a starch-digesting enzyme) thus inhibiting it from breaking down the starch into glucose and then fat. This state lasts for approximately an hour, in which time, the majority of the starch that is eaten passes through the digestive system in whole molecule form (in much the same way as indigestible fibre does) therefore limiting the glucose created in the body and ultimately reducing calorie intake.

I do not know this particular product, however, I do know that if starches are not digested/absorbed in the upper portion of the small intestine they are then metabolized by bacteria in the bowel. This can cause gas and other related disturbances. Thus, while his product may 'work', it may also have severe and unpleasant side-effects.

#5
RickLV

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This my help. PDF located at:
http://www.ajcn.org/...eprint/38/4/498

[snip]
ABSTRACT We have tested the effectiveness of a commercial starch blocker on the digestion and absorption of dietary carbohydrates in six normal, healthy volunteers. The effectiveness of the starch blocker to attenuate or block the digestion of carbohydrate was assessed against a placebo by the measurement of end tidalbreath hydrogen, plasma glucose, and insulin responses to a constant test meal. There were no significant differences in breath hydrogen, or plasma glucose and insulin responses. In vitro enzyme inhibition studies assessed the abilityof the brush border enzyme maltase/glucoamylase to degrade starch in the presence of the starch blockers. A highly purified solution of rat and human maltase/glucoamylase was capable of degrading a starch solution, while 40 mM Tris-HC1 (a known maltase/glucoamylase inhibitor) completely abolished the enzyme activity. These data challenge the claims that starch blocker preparations are effective in reducing or attenuating the absorption of carbohydrates or calories from a mixed meal. The ineffectiveness in vivo could be explained, in part, by the ability of the brush border enzyme maltase/glucoamylase to hydrolyze starch in the presence of starch blockers. Am J Clin Nutr 1983:38:498-503.
[snip]
62 yo, T-II

#6
Harold

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The FDA pulled several carb blockers off the market in the '80s because they were deemed ineffective and consumers reported side effects such as bloating, gas, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Even recent formulations have been shown to cause these side effects; manufacturers claim that they are a sign that the pills are working. Lovely.

Looks like the weight your most likely to lose is the money in your pocket.




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