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#1
wiseguy

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One of the symptoms I had before being diagnosed with type 2 (about three weeks ago) was blurred vision. For the past two weeks I have kept my BG levels in the normal range (fasting 100 - 110 and never rising above 140 after meals) but the blurred vision has not subsided at all. How long does it usually take for your vision to return to normal?

#2
Cinnabon

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I would have to say that your body is getting used to running normal now. Go to an Opthamologist and get a check up. This is always #1!

Please keep us posted:)
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#3
notme

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My first symptom of diabetes was blurred vision also. It took about two years for the blurred vision to go away. Even after two years, I had bouts of blurred vision if my blood sugar went up. My prescription changes even now. I have been wearing prescription sunglasses and glasses for driving. Now my Rx isn't needed anymore and I wear over the counter sunglasses. I don't think it ever goes away totally. You will always have some small changes in your vision.
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#4
princesslinda

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Hi Wiseguy:
Like you, i'm newly diagnosed (Aug 06). I had went to the ophthalmologist a year before my diagnosis because I was having a decrease in visual acuity and had to really squint to bring things into focus. He told me it was "presbyopia" and it was normal for someone my age (42) to notice visual changes. I also do a lot of computer work and that doesn't help things.

When I was diagnosed with diabetes, I did some reading on visual changes and read that high blood sugars actually change the shape of the eye while it is elevated and that this resolves when blood sugars are within normal limits. I have noticed that my vision has improved somewhat since my levels have been controlled, but not back to what I considered "baseline." I have worn glasses since age 14, so i'm half blind anyway, but this was a different kind of blurry.

I would encourage you to have an exam with an ophthalmologist to make sure all is well. It may be that a new prescription is in order.

#5
Cyborg

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I find it hard to focus my eyes when my bg goes too low. Perhaps you are still adjusting to the normal bg values. It is imperative that diabetics see an ophthalmologist once a year.
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#6
xMenace

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I could be a simple coincidence: your at the age where you need glasses or you have cataracts or ???. Get em checked out.:nurse:

Virginia Woolf: “Consider how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed, what wastes and deserts of the soul a slight attack of influenza brings to view, what precipices and lawns sprinkled with bright flowers a little rise of temperature reveals, what ancient and obdurate oaks are uprooted in us by the act of sickness, how we go down in the pit of death and feel the waters of annihilation close above our heads and wake thinking to find ourselves in the presence of the angels and the harpers when we have a tooth out and come to the surface in the dentist's arm-chair and confuse his "Rinse the mouth-rinse the mouth" with the greeting of the Deity stooping from the floor of Heaven to welcome us - when we think of this, as we are so frequently forced to think of it, it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature”
Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172


#7
wiseguy

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Thank you for all the great responses!

My first symptom of diabetes was blurred vision also. It took about two years for the blurred vision to go away.

Wow, two years? I've read, and my doctor concurs, that it can take up to three months of controlled BG levels for the blurred vision to clear up completely.

It could be a simple coincidence: your at the age where you need glasses or you have cataracts or ???.

The onset of the blurred vision occurred too rapidly for it to be an age related condition. I have been using reading glasses for several years, but beyond that, my vision was fine until a few weeks ago.

I have made an appointment with my ophthalmologist so I guess I'll know much more after that.

#8
Michelle66

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I too went to the eye doctor before being diagnosed Type 1--walked out with a $600 pair of glasses and still blurry vision.

Dr told me to go get an inexpensive pair of low magnification glasses until the eysight wasn't blurry ...best advice.

#9
sumncguy

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They are now checking me ... Diabtes is on both sides of the family.
Sugar was very high 273. They put me on glucafase <- spelling ?
generic metformin 500mg .. I have been taking that for about a week. Since starting that medicine, Ive noticed blurred vision. I DID NOT have blurred vision prior to starting these meds.
Im thinking they've bumped me down too low. I have an appointment today in a few minutes... so we will see.

#10
foxl

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The blurred vision is a direct conseqence of the glucose levels in your lenses.

When BG is high, you will be more nearsighted; as it comes back down you will be more farsighted for while. The changes are fairly rapid -- a couple weeks at most.

You needn't wait to see an ophtho any more than a month of stable BG's.
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#11
hoppy697

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i was hospitalized a month ago with type2 diabetes. while in the hospital i had a insulin drip iv and injected with insulin(blood sugar was 500 when admitted) after being released from the hospital i was prescribed metformin 500 mg.three days after i was released my blurred vision
returned. metformin takes a while to get into your system(about three weeks) had the runs too.in three weeks my vision is much better
(it was like looking through a glass) so hopefully it won't be long before it completely heals.

#12
healthreform

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CNN and Midland Daily News had an article on this today here [url=http://www.ourmidland.com/voices/general/article_e9a61430-3e0b-11e0-9be1-0017a4aa8e72.html]Diabetes Blurry Vision: Will you lose your eyesight? - Midland Daily News: General[/url]

#13
chapel

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My vision has returned to about 98% about a week and a half ago. It was a scary experience for me not being able to focus my eyes enough to read. I'm glad I got a Eye doctor appointment the day after I was diagnosed. My main worry was that I had done permanent ****age to my eyes. My eye doctor did a battery of tests and assured me my eyes were not damaged. She instructed me to get two pairs of reading glasses and said my vision should return once my BG levels were stable for a while. It is different for everyone but thank god I'm able to see without them now. I actually have a follow up this afternoon with the Eye doctor. I pray each of you have positive outcomes with your vision.

#14
SoMoteItBe

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I know this post originated a long while ago but the topic is a stand out in my life right now. I am experiencing severe Retinopathy right now in my right eye. I will be having surgery on Wednesday, a procedure called a Vetrachtomy, hopefully it will restore SOME of the vision, but the doctor is really just banking on it not getting worse. I can barely see anything but shadows, light and some color. My left eye had a few real bad bleeds in it, but they're slowly getting in control. I tell you what, going from great vision to not being able to see is goofier than a pet raccoon... I plea to each of you, don't ignore your eye exams and if something seems wrong SEEK ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY! Once they go they're like volcanoes and once that retina peals off and actually dies... ya through!!!

-Brian S.

#15
xMenace

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Good luck with this Brian. Keep your chin up; the technology is very good. I had one four years ago last October, and my sight is now stable.

I attribute my success to a good A1C via pumping and a nutrition overhaul. Of course it's a battle to the end.

The procedure itself isn't anything to be afraid of. It's very much like going to a cool adventure movie. Enjoy the drugs! ;)

It's the three months afterwards that are monotonous and stressful.

Virginia Woolf: “Consider how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed, what wastes and deserts of the soul a slight attack of influenza brings to view, what precipices and lawns sprinkled with bright flowers a little rise of temperature reveals, what ancient and obdurate oaks are uprooted in us by the act of sickness, how we go down in the pit of death and feel the waters of annihilation close above our heads and wake thinking to find ourselves in the presence of the angels and the harpers when we have a tooth out and come to the surface in the dentist's arm-chair and confuse his "Rinse the mouth-rinse the mouth" with the greeting of the Deity stooping from the floor of Heaven to welcome us - when we think of this, as we are so frequently forced to think of it, it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature”
Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172


#16
SoMoteItBe

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It's the three months afterwards that are monotonous and stressful.


Did you have to keep your face down afterward? If so how long etc etc....?

-Brian S.

#17
xMenace

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No.

That's only needed if they give you a gas bubble. Torn retinas typicaly need a bubble. Even then you may not have to sleep on your belly. There have been a few threads on this long ago. Dunno if I can find them or not.

Virginia Woolf: “Consider how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed, what wastes and deserts of the soul a slight attack of influenza brings to view, what precipices and lawns sprinkled with bright flowers a little rise of temperature reveals, what ancient and obdurate oaks are uprooted in us by the act of sickness, how we go down in the pit of death and feel the waters of annihilation close above our heads and wake thinking to find ourselves in the presence of the angels and the harpers when we have a tooth out and come to the surface in the dentist's arm-chair and confuse his "Rinse the mouth-rinse the mouth" with the greeting of the Deity stooping from the floor of Heaven to welcome us - when we think of this, as we are so frequently forced to think of it, it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature”
Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172





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