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#1
Penny

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I think we had this discussion before. but cannot find it. I just got a summons. I have served before, but it was 30 years ago. I actually found it very interesting, but I was young enough to endure the physical discomfort, being low, etc. Now I will need to take my meter, needles, pens, pills, etc. The summons said food was only available in vending machines, so might need to take snacks or even meals......the last time I was there 12 hours on one day. I don't want to get out of jury duty, but wonder how difficult it will be for me to do it. Anyone serve and how did you handle testing and snacks etc? Was there any trouble with getting meters and needles through security?
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#2
Jan B

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I am wierd; I like Jury Duty! I've been on a couple interesting cases.

You can do it! I can't imagine you'd be bothered by security -- just package your supplies (including good snacks) neatly and be confident!
Jan

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Diagnosed at age 18

#3
Penny

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I am wierd; I like Jury Duty! I've been on a couple interesting cases.

You can do it! I can't imagine you'd be bothered by security -- just package your supplies (including good snacks) neatly and be confident!


Me too! I thought it was really interesting.....I was one of those people who held out though because I didn't think they proved he was guilty. I wasn't the only one, but we had a "hung jury" which resulted in a retrial. There were people on the jury who wanted to convict the man because "You know if he isn't guilty of this one, he is guilty of something he just didn't get caught at." Not a good enough reason for me.
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#4
princesslinda

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I, too, liked jury duty....I have served 4 different times.

Penny, you can always have your doctor write you a note stating that because of your various health problems it would be difficult for you to serve on a jury. We do it all the time for our patients.

If you don't want to do that, and you really don't want to serve, just answer the questions they ask you in a way that will ensure you get rejected. I know that I get questioned a lot because I work in a doctor's office and they are afraid I might not be "objective" when it's a medical case. Convince them you'd have a hard time being objective...and you won't have to serve.

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#5
Penny

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I, too, liked jury duty....I have served 4 different times.

Penny, you can always have your doctor write you a note stating that because of your various health problems it would be difficult for you to serve on a jury. We do it all the time for our patients.

If you don't want to do that, and you really don't want to serve, just answer the questions they ask you in a way that will ensure you get rejected. I know that I get questioned a lot because I work in a doctor's office and they are afraid I might not be "objective" when it's a medical case. Convince them you'd have a hard time being objective...and you won't have to serve.


I really don't want to get out of it, just wonder how to deal with it. Did you have any trouble getting your meter or needles or pills pass security? Did you have regular breaks during the trial...and were you able to bring in foods? Those are the things I worry about.
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#6
princesslinda

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I really don't want to get out of it, just wonder how to deal with it. Did you have any trouble getting your meter or needles or pills pass security? Did you have regular breaks during the trial...and were you able to bring in foods? Those are the things I worry about.


Fortunately, I wasn't diabetic last time I served. I think if you have a note from your doc saying you're diabetic and need your "pariphenalia" with you at all times, i'd think that should suffice. I'd just make sure I had everything all together in one case so they can check it easily if they needed to.

T2, diagnosed 8/31/06.
Meds: Metformin-ER 500 mg twice daily, HCTZ 12.5 mg every other day for BP Enalapril 20 mg 1 daily (ace-inhibitor)
Diet: I eat to my meter, generally eating 75-100 carbs/day with the occasional splurge.


#7
Jan B

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Penny,

If you go down there & see how many summoned people excuse theirselves, you'd be amazed. I personally could have dismissed myself for two or three minor reasons with no questions asked.

On my last case, we had a judge who was extremely understanding of our needs, and gave us breaks every 2 hours.

The chairs were very comfortable and I liked my fellow jurors. But, if you have physical aches and pains when you have to be still for long periods, you might want to shoot me for encouraging you to go! The last time I was on a jury was the first time I had arthritis like I do -- but the case was so interesting, I didn't think about my physical well-being!
Jan

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Diagnosed at age 18

#8
JediSkipdogg

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I can't serve on jury duty :bawling:
Darn it being in the wrong line of work.
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#9
Dawn

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I don't think they can say you can't serve because you are diabetic can they? So, I would hope that they would be supportive with whatever you needed to do to care for yourself while serving. Since you are interested in serving then maybe get a note from your doctor that you are diabetic and these supplies are necessary if it becomes an issue...just like Jan said...walk in confidently - like you own the place :)
Keep us posted...maybe you'll get picked for something really exciting!
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#10
EasyType2

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In our Courts - both criminal and civil - judges are accustomed to dealing with potential jurors having various medical problems. Our Judges offer all prospective jurors the option of speaking with him/her in chambers should you not wish to discuss your medical details in public.

I agree that you would be wise to package all your D supplies in a single container, and have a note from a doc confirming that you are Diabetic. This is for courthouse security - not for the actual jury selection process.
I was born with nothing and I've still got most of it.

#11
Jan B

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I can't serve on jury duty :bawling:
Darn it being in the wrong line of work.


Jedi - I'm sorry you can't serve, but I'm very glad there are people like you!
Jan

Type 1 since 1979
Diagnosed at age 18

#12
Penny

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The last time I served, I was about 30, had two children in junior high. I had to get them off to school, walk about 6 long blocks to the bus stop, ride for 25 minutes, walk to the court house. According to how long I was there, I either repeated the process, or Hubby came to pick me up. We were allowed to go to the cafeteria for lunch during deliberations, and have soft drinks and snacks in the jury room......but not during the actual trial. The letter I got says, food was available only in vending machines. I do have arthritis pain, but I can deal with that. Hubby can take me and pick me up. I probably need to get a new "Diabetic" necklace (mine broke). I just filled out the form online, and already got a confirmation email. I am to call on Dec. 7, and must be available on Dec. 10th. I know I could get out of it, but I feel it is an important part of being a good citizen, I am a little worried about my health, but I think I can handle it. The thing I find funny....my husband is 71, has never been called at all. This is the 3rd time for me....the first I was 22, had two children under 2, they dismissed me, I didn't even have to ask. :)
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#13
EasyType2

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Penny, I'm in the same general age group and I've never served on a trial jury. I did serve a 6-mo term on a Grand Jury which was most interesting.
I was born with nothing and I've still got most of it.

#14
shockme

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i'd love to be picked! not yet....hubby keeps getting picked and he tells them whatever to get out of it.let us know if it's a serial killer or anything cool like that! trish
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#15
parrotletzoo

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I had to go to the court house (also county building) here to get a copy of my birth cert a couple of years ago. Here they xray your bags on the conveyor belt thingy ;) and make you go through metal detectors. They asked me to open my purse and show them my meter. They asked what it was and I showed them my insulin pump before I went through the metal detectors. They didn't even notice that I had syringes in my purse. If you have a medic alert ID wear it. That will give further proof that you need your meter etc. As far as snacks go, I"d just bring glucose tabs and some snacks. I doubt they'll have a problem with it. There are plenty of peopel with diabetes that get called up for jury duty each year.
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#16
Alice

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I would hate to think that a diabetic would feel limited from jury duty. I simply write down that I'm Type 1 and may need to monitor blood sugar and eat at certain intervals depending on blood sugar.

I was always sent home after they also read that I worked for major newspapers...I don't think that being diabetic had anything to do with it...

For the sake of citizens with diabetes...I would hate that that would be a reason to dismiss.

#17
labob

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I just served on a jury in September of this year (in fact, you can call me Mr. Foreman). I don't think you'll have any problem.

The security personnel are definitely not going to care about your diabetic supplies. As long as you're not carrying a gun or a knife, you'll be fine. At the courthouse where I served in September (I was across the hall from the Phil Spector trial), the sensors were so sensitive that no matter what I did, I set off the alarm every single time I walked through the metal detector. Must have been the fillings in my teeth, because I removed every single metal object I could think of before passing through -- in fact, as far as I could tell, everyone who passed through the sensors set off the alarm. Once you get that juror badge, you will have no problem passing through, no matter how many alarms you set off.

As far as meals go, you'll probably want to take your lunch no matter what the local options are. Courthouse cafeterias are kind of awful, even for non-diabetics. No one will hassle you if you bring food into the courthouse.

Once you're in a courtroom, the judge controls, and in my experience as a lawyer, there is one constant: judges love jurors, even if they sometimes hate lawyers. You'll have ample time to check your levels during breaks (which typically are frequent -- in fact, most jurors gripe that there are too many breaks). If you're feeling woozy in between, all you need to do is alert the judge. I've never run across one who wouldn't be solicitous.

I've served twice as a juror (once before I was a lawyer and once after, which corresponds with once before I was diagnosed with diabetes and once after) and both times I've found it to be an interesting experience. Have fun with it. I sincerely doubt that diabetes will get in the way.

#18
slipperyelm

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I guess I've had jury duty about 8 times. We have city, state, and federal courts here. Fortunately, our county courts do not call people from my town, or else I'd get called more. But I get called about every 1.5 to 3 years; It varies. My husband has been called more than I. Oh, additionally, I've been excused from jury duty twice and put back into the pool to be drawn no sooner than one year. Once when I had a newborn nursing every 2 hours. And once during the long period through which stupid metformin controlled my life due to diarrhea. Both just required phone calls to the jury commissioner's office at the time I got the summons. No doctor's note was needed at that time.

Twice when I had jury duty I had terrible back pain, but that was just par for the course for about 12 years of my life, so I endured it. Hated it, but just did it.

So here, I think they are quite reasonable about making allowances.

Oh and remember, even if you are having the kind of trouble with your diabetes that would make jurty duty hard to impossible, it could very well be that in the future things will be better for you and you can serve without any problem.

I've never actually served on a jury. Once in the jury panel interviews, the judge told me not to respond to any further questions and to not say anything more, to not speak to any other potential jurors on the next break. Evidently what I'd said automatically excluded me and he did not want the thought to spread. All I said was that I wasn't sure I could adhere to all instructions he might give us in the course of the trial--because I didn't know what those instructions might be. I'm a reasonable, very law-abiding person, but I wouldn't want to sign any blank checks, so to speak. I'd want to know what I'm swearing to do before I swear to do it.

One other guy was also told not to speak anymore during that selection. I can't remember what it was that made the judge tell him to hush. But during the break he and I were talking to each other. Another guy came up to us and said that he understood we couldn't talk but that he just wanted to say that was a shame we got excluded from the jury because, he said, if he were on trial he would want jurors who showed ability to think as we did. That was kind of nice to hear; I think I'd want people like me and this other guy on a jury, too.

It probably turned out to be a good thing that I got excluded from that jury anyway. As they went on to question the potential jurors, they had to inquire if anyone knew any of the people involved, the business involved, the neighborhood involved. I would have had to say I knew everyone, all the places, the business, (and more!). It was my old neighborhood, my old mechanic shop which I went to because I'd had three friends who'd worked in this garage-gas station! I kind of think the lawyers and judge might not have believed that--they probably would have thought I was just saying that to get excluded from the jury. For one thing, I'm this prim looking middle aged, middle class white woman and I was about a 0.5% minority in that rough, poor almost entirely black neighborhood. The would not in a million years guess I had anything to do with the parties involved in the lawsuit....So I figured they'd think I was lying. Therefor, I was relieved to have already been excluded and told not to answer anymore questions. I did not want to be thought a liar.

If you do serve, thanks. I agree with those respectful little salutatory talks the judges give--the system really does depend on jurors, it can be a really tough job and emotional, too. Your jury services helps us all. Your wisdom, your understanding helps us all. I don't think being a juror is about rubber stamping some outcome that is a given. It is a really responsible position, a serious one.

#19
Cyborg

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I know as a diabetic you can get out of jury. I've used diabetes to avoid it a couple times myself. :eek:

Personally, I'd rather not have someone that is hypo and not clear minded (or with extremely high bg and moody) making a decision in my trial...
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#20
onenineone

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Hello,.....everyone.I'm new as of 04/09.This is my first time posting,...or anything like this on the internet,....but here goes.I have read a lot of posts in the last few day's and I can not find... my... excuse anywhere. Not that I'm looking for an excuse,...but this is real.Needing to go to the rest room,twice in 90 minutes,.........now mind you it's only in the morning.It's been like that for years now,I'm retierd so I am in a controlled environment.When I'm in court,........ I won't be in controlled,.....someone else will.Been type2 d.b. 08/2000,..A1c then was 12.1 and as of march 30,09,....A1c is 7.6,.......2005 it was 9.5,.....2008 it was 8.8. Now saying all of that,..... I don't want to get a contempt charge,.....because I had to go to the rest room. Are their any any answers out there. born:1949 first adult job:1966 retierd:04/2000 UN: onenineone




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