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Canadian Humalog??

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#1
mike_g

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Hello everyone.

Nice site you have here.

I have been a type 1 since about 2003. I am on multiple daily injections with humalog and lantus as a basal.

With the rising cost of meds and insurance, I googled "humalog vial price" and came up with canadian humalog for about $45, shipped. I have been picking it up at the local wal-mart, where the full price is about 96.00.

Does anyone pick up humalog or other insulin in canada? What explains the price difference? Governmental controls?

Are there any safety/quality concerns with buying insulin this way?

Thanks in advance,

#2
HollyB

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I can't comment on the price, but I would think the only safety concern would be the same as with any shipped product: is the temperature controlled properly during transit? You don't want your new insulin roasting or freezing in the bowels of a bus luggage compartment...
Holly
Mom to Aaron, 17, Type 1 Sept. 05

#3
cheryl

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I was wondering the same thing.....want to know besides the way it is shipped is it safe, or just some joe shmoe, trying to rip ya off, I don't insulin keeps me a live so I feel a bit leary about it just a tad....But my hubby thinks I am over reacting

Cheryl
Don't know who I want as president, but I know I don't want to live like a communist....ENOUGH SAID.....

March a1c 6.4
Pumper 522 with Humalog

#4
Gerald

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I get Humalog at the Shopper's Drug Mart, I'm on a drug plan at work where I only pay 10% and it costs me $14 for the five vial pack. I guess that would work out to $140 at normal price sans the drugplan.

#5
xMenace

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I get Humalog at the Shopper's Drug Mart, I'm on a drug plan at work where I only pay 10% and it costs me $14 for the five vial pack. I guess that would work out to $140 at normal price sans the drugplan.


Those are the penfills and are much smaller. My three 10ML vials costs $100.47. I don't know the reason for the differences, but much of the publicity in the past decade suggests Americans are getting hosed.
Michelle Oberg "yep....stop trying to make vegetables taste like meat.....you made your choice, now live with it hippies"

Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172

#6
xMenace

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The Fraser Institute: Despite Price Controls, Canadians Spend as Much as Americans on Prescription Drugs - Press Release

The Fraser Institute: Despite Price Controls, Canadians Spend as Much as Americans on Prescription Drugs

TORONTO, ONTARIO -- 11/26/07 -- Government policies around the pricing and reimbursement of prescription drugs in Canada do not produce lower costs for Canadians compared to Americans, according to a new study from independent research organization The Fraser Institute.
On average Canadians are spending about the same percentage of their incomes on prescription drugs as Americans, according to The Cost Burden of Prescription Drug Spending in Canada and the United States.

"American public policies rely more on free market forces like private insurance, price signals, consumer choice and competition to determine the premium paid for new drug innovations as well as to discount the price of generic drugs," said Brett Skinner, the Institute's Director of Health, Pharmaceutical and Insurance Policy Research and lead author of the study.

"In Canada, governments increasingly rely on public drug programs, price controls, formulary restrictions, forced generic substitution and central planning."

The study compared total per capita spending on prescription drugs in Canada and the United States. Using the most recent publicly available data from 2006, the study found that prescription drug expenditures made up roughly the same percentage of income before taxes in both countries. In Canada, per capita spending on prescription drugs was 1.5 per cent of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) compared to 1.6 per cent for Americans.

Per capita prescription drug expenditures were a slightly higher percentage of after-tax income in Canada than they were in the United States with Canadians spending 2.5 per cent of their personal disposable income (PDI) on prescription drugs compared to only 2.2 per cent for Americans.

The results cannot be explained by differences in the number of prescriptions taken by Canadians and Americans. The study found that the number of prescriptions dispensed per capita in each country is approximately the same. In 2006, 13 prescriptions were dispensed per person in Canada versus 12.3 prescriptions per person in the United States.

"Even though Canadian prices for brand name drugs are lower than U.S. prices for identical drugs, consumers in both countries spend roughly the same percentage of their personal income on drugs because the price of Canadian generics is more than double U.S. prices for identical drugs," Skinner said.

He suggested the root causes of high generic drug prices in Canada are government policies that shield retail pharmacies and generic drug manufacturers from competitive market forces that would naturally put downward pressure on generic drug prices.

"Other research shows that Canadians who rely on the country's public drug programs don't have the same degree of access to new medicines as do Americans. The evidence makes it clear that Canadian prescription drug policies do not produce lower costs or better choice for Canadians," Skinner said.

"When you factor in the positive influence American prescription drug policies have in terms of stimulating investment and research on new medicines, you can see that U.S. policies produce better outcomes for its citizens than is the case in Canada."

The Fraser Institute is an independent research and educational organization with offices in Calgary, Montreal, Tampa, Toronto, and Vancouver. Its mission is to measure, study, and communicate the impact of competitive markets and government intervention on the welfare of individuals. To protect the Institute's independence, it does not accept grants from governments or contracts for research. Visit The Fraser Institute.


Contacts:
The Fraser Institute
Brett Skinner, Director,
Health, Pharmaceutical and Insurance Policy Research
(416) 363-6575, ext. 224
Email: bretts@fraserinstitute.ca

The Fraser Institute
Dean Pelkey
Director of Communications
(604) 714-4582
Email: deanp@fraserinstitute.ca
Website: The Fraser Institute
Michelle Oberg "yep....stop trying to make vegetables taste like meat.....you made your choice, now live with it hippies"

Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172

#7
beau91

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Here in quebec canada .I pay for the 5 cartridges of 3.0ml 61.99$ and humalin N 40.99$ ,the prices wen't up a little while ago .Bye Ricky
Hi my name is Richard for short Ricky .I'm from Montreal Canada .Diabetic since 1993.



A diplomat is a man who always remembers a women birthday but never remembrs her age . Robert Frost[SIGPIC][SIGPIC][[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#8
mike_g

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Thanks for the replies -

It does appear that Canada's government controls the pricing on Humalog, among other brand name drugs. I am usually a generic-prescription type guy, but there is no generic Humalog or Lantus on the horizon.

I may look into this further, depending on what my 2008 insurance costs.

Any recommended reputable mail-order canadian pharmacies? (I am living in the US)

Thanks again,

#9
soso

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I pay about 60-70 bucks for 5 penfills of Novorapid ( fast acting) including about $8 in dispensing fees from costco

I have used diabetes express for other things and been pleased with their speed... it is .ca)
SoSo


Dx Sept 2004
A1c 5.5
MDI

#10
Dewey

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I've used Canadian drug sites to order meds when I've been without insurance & the like. In the past (a couple of years ago), I've ordered Humalog at approx. $30 to $33 a vial compared to the local price of $65+! I also had better luck with the potency of the insulin I ordered from the Canadian drug site than I did with insulin ordered from my ins. company!

ALL my love, Carwy & Best wishes for many healthy years to come! :love:
Saying prayers for him & all our friends, every day.
_______
“There are people who have money and people who are rich." - Coco Chanel
______


Type I for 31 years (Since Jan of 1982)
'Pumping' for 17 years (Since Feb. 1996)
Pumps used: MM 506,7,8,11 & 512, 722
Cozmore 1700 & 1800, Animas IR 1200, 1250, Animas Ping

Meters Used:
Many

#11
xMenace

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I also had better luck with the potency of the insulin I ordered from the Canadian drug site than I did with insulin ordered from my ins. company!


Our refrigerated trucks never let us down!
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Michelle Oberg "yep....stop trying to make vegetables taste like meat.....you made your choice, now live with it hippies"

Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172




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