Jump to content

Photo

New Toy on the market...painless finger sticks... what do you guys think?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1
KEVIN88GT

KEVIN88GT

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 147 posts
I've been watching this for over a year (found out about it a while back....even before it was introduced in the US.) Now it's available here... 200 for the unit and 15 bucks for 100 lancets..... anyone have it yet?

Pelikan Technologies | Products

#2
JediSkipdogg

JediSkipdogg

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 8,753 posts
  • I am a:Type 1
I have been really interested in that however, at the cost, it's not cost efficient. For what it does, it is, but for fingersticking it's not. Especially at testing 10 times a day, that would be $45 a month to use since each lancet can only be used once. And most likely that's not effective to cover under insurance since most insurance 30 day supplies are $30-$45.

I love the idea of the device and it truely does impress me. Now if they could only make it to give a BG as well.
●Blue Ash, Ohio Police Dispatcher
●Type 1 diabetic since 11 months old
●Pumper since December of 2002
~Animas IR 1000 (Dec. 2002 - Jan. 2005)
~Animas IR 1200 (Jan. 2005 - Jan. 2009)
~Cozmo 1800 (Jan. 2009 - ?)
●Dexcom Seven+ (Aug 1, 2009 - Oct 31, 2012)
●Dexcom G4 (Nov 1, 2012 - ???)


Diabetes is an Art, NOT a Science. You must master the control by skills and not by knowledge alone.


#3
KEVIN88GT

KEVIN88GT

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 147 posts
if it works as they say it does... isnt 45 a month worth not getting neuropathy and not feeling pain and having constantly bruised fingers???

#4
JediSkipdogg

JediSkipdogg

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 8,753 posts
  • I am a:Type 1

if it works as they say it does... isnt 45 a month worth not getting neuropathy


Have never heard of neuropathy from constant finger testing. If it's possible, then why do I have no signs in my hand, and very rare signs in my feet.

and not feeling pain


Not really worth the money. Especially since it's also carrying an extra large device. That's at least my opinion.

and having constantly bruised fingers???


25 years of fingertesting (can't do alternate site) and so far no major bruising. I even occasionally rock climb in the summer and it's caused no problems with climbing or testing.
●Blue Ash, Ohio Police Dispatcher
●Type 1 diabetic since 11 months old
●Pumper since December of 2002
~Animas IR 1000 (Dec. 2002 - Jan. 2005)
~Animas IR 1200 (Jan. 2005 - Jan. 2009)
~Cozmo 1800 (Jan. 2009 - ?)
●Dexcom Seven+ (Aug 1, 2009 - Oct 31, 2012)
●Dexcom G4 (Nov 1, 2012 - ???)


Diabetes is an Art, NOT a Science. You must master the control by skills and not by knowledge alone.


#5
soso

soso

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 1,599 posts
Mendosa wrote a rave review of this device about a year or so ago.... I think it was $300+ then...

if price is no object, why not?
SoSo


Dx Sept 2004
A1c 5.5
MDI

#6
Funnygrl

Funnygrl

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 6,758 posts
I've been eyeing this thing for years. I want it, but it's a brick and expensive. I really LOVE my Multiclix, and it's much more practicial.

#7
Handybear

Handybear

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 269 posts
I really don't see a need for this. I was taught to use the sides of each finger rather than the flat pad. It is virtually painless and it give me two spots on each finger to rotate with.
Protons have mass?
I didn't even know they were Catholic!

Diagnosed type 2 on 11-11-06. Wgt 251, A1C 6.1
Diet control only!
Currently 177 lbs, A1C 5.6, cholesterol 160, LDL 95,HDL
53, triglycerides 37. BP 110/70

#8
thomasb

thomasb

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 212 posts
so do we actually loose sensitivity in our fingertips as they say on the site?
Age: 27
Type 1 since December, 2006.
Pump with novorapid, Animas 2020.
A1C 3/22/07: 5.2.
5/14/07: 4.7.
9/21/07: 5.2.
11/22/07: 5.2
4/11/08: 5.2
06-2009: 5.5


#9
SueM

SueM

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 1,399 posts

so do we actually loose sensitivity in our fingertips as they say on the site?


No Thomas you don't for the simple reason you do not poke your finger tips :)
Use the side of your fingers. Even then I still have full sensation in my fingers no matter where they are poked.
Also if you think of it your injection sites don't go numb do they? Yet you are poking needles in every day.(Well the ones on MDI do).
Sue
Pumping using bovine insulin. (Pump kindly donated by Solox)

#10
REDLAN

REDLAN

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 872 posts
In the old days (before I knew any better) fingerstick testing was done into the pad of the finger. This is what I was taught.

The lancets were thicker and longer, because the test strips needed more blood. Testing was PAINFUL, and after a few months of doing it (I did alternate fingers), I ended up with callous like scars on the pads of my fingers - and a reduction in sensitivity.

It was one of the reasons I stopped testing.

The newer lancets are tiny compared to the old ones. There is some pain using them, but it's nothing like the old ones. Fingersticking the sides rather than the pads means that I dont have any problems - fingerstick sites are usually completely healed within 2-3 days.

this item I think to be honest is pretty much superfluous

The Pelikan Sun represents, quite simply, a new dawn in diabetes care


I think that is far far far too much hyperbole :)

#11
shiftzor

shiftzor

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 1,004 posts
This looks to be the new "evolution" of the finger pricker/gluco meter. Looks good to me, anything thats reduces pain has to be a plus, but tbh i hope to be using a pump/cgm well before this becomes cheap enough to use daily. I can dream :D

#12
KEVIN88GT

KEVIN88GT

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 147 posts
yes they do teach to stick on the side of the finger in nursing school... but everyone is different.. It hurts me to do it on the actual side of the finger... so I do it half way between the middle of the pad and the side...

#13
notme

notme

    Super Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 12,996 posts
  • LocationCalifornia
  • I am a:Type 1
I wouldn't use it. I want everything small. This is too big and clunky, but cute. Finger sticks have never been a big issue for me. I use the sides of the pads of my fingers and I alternate. I don't know ten minutes later where I have tested. It may be a nice item for a child that is afraid of the sticks. The machine doesn't look very intimidating.

I have never read where finger sticks cause neuropathy. I don't think that is an issue.
maxwellsmiles1.jpg



Nancy


“I don't expect everything to be handed to me. Just set it down anywhere.”.




diagnosed type 1 October 1986
currently using Medtronic MiniMed
Revel 723 with CGMS
CLEAR [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#14
Dewey

Dewey

    Ex-Moderator

  • 500 plus
  • 7,332 posts
To me, it's a matter of personal choice. I've been doing finger tests for 23 (yrs) out of 25 years with Diabetes & have only seen lancet devices get better & better over the years.

I test on the pads of my fingers & only use four specific fingers to test with. I do not use alternative sites, as they don't seem to work for me. To me, it hurts more to lance the sides of my fingers (which is why I don't use them) than it does the pads. I've had my share of callouses due to "overuse," but callouses heal & believe me when I say No feeling has been lost in the pads of my fingers! :eek:

To me, practicality is a major factor & one that seems very lacking in this device.

ALL my love, Carwy & Best wishes for many healthy years to come! :love:
Saying prayers for him & all our friends, every day.
_______
“There are people who have money and people who are rich." - Coco Chanel
______


Type I for 31 years (Since Jan of 1982)
'Pumping' for 17 years (Since Feb. 1996)
Pumps used: MM 506,7,8,11 & 512, 722
Cozmore 1700 & 1800, Animas IR 1200, 1250, Animas Ping

Meters Used:
Many

#15
BriOnH

BriOnH

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 2,607 posts

Yes, we said convenient AND virtually pain-free


I see this used a lot to describe lancet devices. Is it just me or does it seem a little oxymoronic?

#16
iDream

iDream

    Member

  • 500 plus
  • 338 posts
christmas present possibly? thing is amazing

A1C Pre-Pump: 6.1


Posted Image


A1C Post-Pump: 5.4


#17
ant hill

ant hill

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 7,465 posts

To me, it's a matter of personal choice. I've been doing finger tests for 23 (yrs) out of 25 years with Diabetes & have only seen lancet devices get better & better over the years.

Yes Dewey, Times has changed for the better as I can remember those days Ware you have a meter as big as cash registers and god no!!, Manual finger jabs!! :eek: And they hurt :( Bad memories of the 70's. :(

I test on the pads of my fingers & only use four specific fingers to test with. I do not use alternative sites, as they don't seem to work for me.

I do that too Dewey. :D as I only use the three on each hand so I don't use my thumb or my little pinky. ;) Alternate sites I have not tryied yet??

Posted Image
The lance that you see on the right of the meter is what I use now and it's quite good. :)


nz9q.jpg

Peter...


#18
natalie021

natalie021

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
I only prick the tops of my fingers (like below the fingernail bed). It heals faster, and I don't have to touch anything with that part of my finger. I don't get calloused as much either. Just wanted to throw that out there!:)

#19
ant hill

ant hill

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 7,465 posts

Mendosa wrote a rave review of this device about a year or so ago.... I think it was $300+ then...

if price is no object, why not?


For the testing of BG's at $300US is a bit far fetched for me. :(

I've been eyeing this thing for years. I want it, but it's a brick and expensive. I really LOVE my Multiclix, and it's much more practicial.


Yes I agree Funnygirl, As I have my Accu-Check Performa and the lance is of a good design. The size is big though.

so do we actually loose sensitivity in our fingertips as they say on the site?


Meh, My fingers are fine and I have not lost any sensitivity. :)

Yes, we said convenient AND virtually pain-free

I see this used a lot to describe lancet devices. Is it just me or does it seem a little oxymoronic?

No Brian, You're are not a oxymoron LOL as I find that the lances are by far much better than the manual jabs 35 years ago. Please lets don't go back to those days again. :eek:

Posted Image
It's a pitty that this cannot be made smaller. :confused:


nz9q.jpg

Peter...


#20
Funnygrl

Funnygrl

    Senior Member

  • 500 plus
  • 6,758 posts
Anyone else find it interesting that the thing has sound?




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users