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Abruptly Stopping Insulin

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#1
Murph3

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Is it OK for a T2 to abruptly stop taking insulin?

#2
jps

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Talk to your doc first, please.

I gradually weaned myself off of it and am taking things day by day. But I did make sure it was ok with my doc, he saw no reason for me to try without meds for awhile.

I'll assess it on a day by day basis, I'll have to rely heavily upon my next A1c and then make a decision from there.
"That which doesn't kill us makes us stronger" - Friedrich Nietzsche

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#3
princesslinda

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If you're T2 on insulin, it's because your body isn't making enough of its own insulin to keep your numbers in a good range. Stopping it will only make your blood sugars elevate.

Perhaps following a low-carb diet and getting regular exercise might decrease the amount of insulin you need....but if you've been diabetic for awhile and oral meds aren't working, insulin is the next step....and stopping it may not be the best thing to do.

Why would you want to suddenly stop it? I wouldn't advise doing so w/o talking with your doctor.

T2, diagnosed 8/31/06.
Meds: Metformin-ER 500 mg twice daily, HCTZ 12.5 mg every other day for BP Enalapril 20 mg 1 daily (ace-inhibitor)
Diet: I eat to my meter, generally eating 75-100 carbs/day with the occasional splurge.


#4
Murph3

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I am starting a low carb diet and am afraid that my BG may go too low.

#5
jps

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I'm on Lantus, I went low carb and didn't have a single hypo. However, it's true that you may have to decrease the amount. That's why constant testing and tracking which foods do what to your body is important. As my weight dropped, I was able to really slash the dosage and maintain good numbers.
"That which doesn't kill us makes us stronger" - Friedrich Nietzsche

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#6
Evermont

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Hi Murph - it's me again.

Like the others said, talk to doc before changing meds.

I know you're sick and tired of being diabetic and ready to shake things up - that's great! On the other hand, drastic sudden changes are often not sustainable, and can lead to a cycle of defeat and misery. We don't want that. You need to develop a healthy lifestyle that you can live with for a whole, long lifetime. No quick fixes. No crash diets. Evolve rather than transform.

You recall the story of the tortoise and the hare yes? Slow and steady wins the race and all that jazz. It's probably safe for us to assume that your diet is not ideal and that you could benefit from lowering carbs - and probably switching from some carb-in-a-box to the good kind e.g. things with stems. Pick the one worst thing out of your diet and replace it with the healthiest food that you can stand to eat for the rest of your life. Repeat as needed.

Let's not fall off a cliff here. Coast down a gentle slope. Make some changes that you can live with, test along the way, track the results and once you sneak up on better numbers start worrying about going low and talking to your doctor about reducing insulin.

Don't thrash Murph. Focus, concentrate, chip away at this thing. Small victories beget larger victories. Eat that whale one bite at a time.

#7
fgummett

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From my experience of going very low-carb there was an immediate drop off in insulin need, but it was the bolus or meal-time fast-acting insulin which I first reduced and then stopped. Meantime the long-acting basal has need to be slowly adjusted downwards as my weight has dropped. Protein can be converted to Glucose (up to 58% of it by some accounts) so you are likely to still need insulin at least for while... it becomes a balancing acting between enough insulin to maintain a healthy BG while minimising insulin to help with weight-loss.

Frequent testing is the key. Are you comfortable and confident adjusting your own insulin amounts or do yo need to see your Doctor for that? At the very least it is worth while letting your Doctor know what you are planning.

You might find this thread useful: http://www.diabetesf...b-diet-how.html

#8
Murph3

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Great advise from you all.

I am going at this slow and steady. Hopefully I will see results.




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