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Running and Type 1

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#1
lark 27

lark 27

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I just went from occassionally working out/jogging to consistently running a few weeks ago. I have Type 1 diabetes, and use a minimed paradigm pump. I love running and am feeling positive effects already.

I currently run about 2 or 3miles a day (5x/wk.) but have a 4 mile race Saturday and then plan on upping the mileage (slowly) with the goal of eventually doing a 1/2 marathon. At my current mileage I really don't need to adjust my basal rate or fuel up and bolus during the run. However, with upping the mileage I'll need carbs during the run. Any tips from anyone on how to run that tightrope between low and high BGs while adequately fueling? Also, curious what people use as a target starting BG prior to a lengthy workout. I'm thinking below 120 and I'll have some carbs when I start.

Thanks for any tips!
Lark

#2
cwathne

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how many carbs you need will be unique to you, but just for reference I eat 25-50 grams per hour.

I carry these on me; they get sugar to your blood very fast Posted Image
Type 1 since 3/2000
Humalog + HumulinN
Last A1C's: 5.8, 6.0, 5.9, 5.8, 5.6, 5.4 (6/8/10) ;)

#3
Gordonm

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I use the Gu packs all the time and always have at east 2 of them on my bike at all times. I will usually eat about 1 an hour on long rides. Anything around 1 hour I just have a carb drink and water and that keeps me level. I try to stay in the range of 80 to 130 on my rides. Usually it is closer to the 80 range just because of the energy I'm putting out. Everyone is different so just test a lot in the beginning and see what works for you. I just leave my basal running normal and bolus for 1/2 the carbs before the ride. On the ride I will not bolus for anything I eat. I have consumed as much as 100Gs of carbs on a 3 hr ride never bolused and my BS stayed right in the 80 to 100 range. Just my experience. Your results will vary.
Type 1 since 4/74
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2013 3196
2014 2121 miles

#4
lark 27

lark 27

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Thanks for the info to Gordonm and cwathne. It's helpful to hear what others are having success with. The gu looks like a good option for ease and speed. I usually go the inexpensive route and use Fruit Snacks as my emergency rations, but will get some gu especially for the weekly long run.

Cheers,
Lark

#5
Scratch

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It's all very individual.

I try to have my blood sugar somewhere between 100 and 150 mg/dL before I run.

I ran a half-marathon in 2007 where I ate 8g of carbs about halfway, but that was because I had some residual bolus in my system. Last year, I didn't need to eat any carbs for the race and my blood sugar was up over 200 at the end.
MDI, Lantus and Novolog
A1c 2/12 -- 5.9%

#6
Scratch

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Whoops, no, my blood sugar was 155 mg/dL when I finished last year.
MDI, Lantus and Novolog
A1c 2/12 -- 5.9%

#7
kstreeter513

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I run quite a bit. I've run two marathons and just officially started training for my third today! I, too, have got a minimed pump, and I have got my routine down to a science now. It works for me, you may need to tweak it to work for you.

Three hours before my run, I eat 50-75 CHO and bolus as normal. As soon as the bolus is done, I adjust my basal down from .45 to .15 u/h, so about 33% of my original basal. This keeps me from dropping too much on my runs. Following this routine usually puts me at about 150-180 before a run, which I feel is about right. This works for a five miler but anything over that, I need to take glucose with me. I also use GU.

Fueling immediately after your run with carbs is important too if you're planning on training for a half-marathon. This is what puts carbs back in your muscles to get ready for the next run.

Be careful bolusing after your run. I have found that after an easy run, I am more sensitive than normal. But to complicate things, after a hard run, sometimes I can even be a little resistant. I think its a hormonal thing. It takes more insulin to knock down the counter regulatory hormones produced by exercise.

#8
lark 27

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Thanks Kyle. I guess with anything it takes some time to figure out the patterns (and then something breaks the patter so always be prepared!) That 1/2 marathon is going to be a while down the road as I found 4 miles quite a challenge this weekend, but I'm making progress.

#9
sugardarlin

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Thanks Kyle. I guess with anything it takes some time to figure out the patterns (and then something breaks the patter so always be prepared!) That 1/2 marathon is going to be a while down the road as I found 4 miles quite a challenge this weekend, but I'm making progress.

Lark, Congratuations on your resolution to do the half! My very first race was a half last year, and it was the best thing I ever did for myself. Since then I've run one full marathon, 3 other halves and many 5 and 9k's. I now LOVE running. I also used Hal Higdon's training schedule which I can send to you if you would like. A great book to read is "Half Marathon: You Can Do It" by Jeff Galloway ([url=http://www.amazon.com/Half-Marathon-You-Can-Jeff-Galloway/dp/1841261904)][/url]. Really a great read to keep you motivated, on track, avoid injury and doing it right. I've had diabetes for 31 years, been on the Paradigm pump for 15 years. It took a lot of adjusting and playing with the temporary basal rates and what food to eat before and after, to get it right. I was checking my bloodsugars every few miles in the beginning of my running. I also always carry GU gels (like the others), a tube of glucose, my monitor and my cell phone in my fanny pack. I know it sounds like a lot of stuff, but it gives me great peace of mind. And when I run, I use the Walgreens Tru2Go monitor ([url=http://www.walgreens.com/store/product.jsp?id=prod4199459&CATID=100133&skuid=sku4198329&V=G&ec=frgl_523403&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=sku4198329)]TRUE2go No Coding Blood Glucose Monitoring System | Walgreens | Walgreens[/url], only because it is so small, and the sticks are inside the monitor, so it's super space-saving. I always start out no lower than 130 for any run I'm doing, that may sound too high for some, but I would rather be on the high side than risk the danger of being on the road alone and go too low. And then I adjust my basal according to how long I will be running. I turn it down to half or less for middle-length runs (6-8 miles) and then suspend it if I'm doing longer runs (9-13 miles). And, depending on my BG's, I usually always take sips of the gatorade along the last half of any of the race routes. My first race went so well! I started out at 135, and ended up at 120. That was the best part of the victory for me...not only crossing the finish line, but crossing the line, sitting down, and testing...to see 120. I took a picture of it. I started crying because it was the most glorious blood sugar reading of my life. (lol) Good Luck Lark! I am so excited for you!

#10
issysmommy

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Great info here. Thanks. I'm training to walk a half in 3 months. And walking has really helped my blood sugars.
Issysmommy
~Jennifer~
Type 1 - 10/85 (11 years old)
Pumping - Feb 99
A1C: 12/06 - 8.9 :dontknow:, 2/07 - 7.9 :o , 2/08 - 7.6 :proud:, 2/09 7.2 :rock: 6/10 - 7.5, Jan 2011 - 7.0000000!!!!! (on LCHF), 7/11 - 7.5 (on rebellious streak of high carbs), 8/12 - 7.2 (back on LCHF)
Vitamin D: Aug 2012 - 16 ng/mL (below average)
HDL: Aug 2012 - 51 mg/dL (*better); LDL: Aug 2012 - 114 mg/dL (*near ideal); Total 187 mg/dL (*best) *according to Mayo Clinic

#11
lark 27

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Thanks for the info you provided Sugardarlin! I've decided the thing I love about running is seeing progress. At first I was looking for progress with distance and times (and viewing glucose control as a hindrance to that progress). Now I really am looking at progress in three ares (distance, time, and diabetes management in relation to running). I love your comment about "That was the best part of the victory for me...not only crossing the finish line, but crossing the line, sitting down, and testing...to see 120. I took a picture of it. I started crying because it was the most glorious blood sugar reading of my life."

I totally agree with the need to start a run at 130 or so. For example, I did 5 miles on saturday where I started at 91 but ate 35 carbs right before running. However, it dropped to 83 (took 15 carbs) and then 71 (took another 15) and dropped to 65 at the end of the run. Of course within an hour after the run I was back up to 190. I just think my body does not really want to digest and absorb carbs very efficiently whilst I'm working out so it's imperative I start at a higher blood glucose level. I don't have quite the same need to be as high if I have the forethought to set my temporary basal rate prior to running, but when I go first thing in the morning I don't always do that.




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