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Diabetics in the military.

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#1
sgtstevens1029

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Ok so i am new to this and not sure what to do or where to post things. I am in the national guard and am supposed to be deploying soon but I have nowfound out that i might not be able to because of my rtype 2 diabetes. Does anyone know if there is a loop hole or something to get me through SRP? Anywhere that I can print out info to take with me that says soldiers with type 2 diabetes can deploy. I hope someone can help me. Thanks

#2
TomB

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Sorry Sarge, but I think you're SOL. You might be able to stay in the Guard by being in permanently not deployable status, depends on your CO and job function. Getting hit with the big D diagnosis is not easy to handle, but you have to think not only of your well being, but also of your grunts. They could have a rough time of it if you went big time hypo or hyperglycemic at precisely the wrong time.
I'm service connected for DMII, Agent Orange. I enjoyed my time in the Air Force. Got up to S/Sgt in special ops flying around in C-130 Talon's. In that job, diabetes is an automatic kick out. I hope that your unit will need and appreciate your service back here in the States.
Something that you need to do pronto: get copies of ALL your medical and service records and keep up-to-date copies of future records. Those records have a way of getting lost - for years.
Best to you and yours
Tom

#3
Barberian

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I don't know about the National Guards rules. In the Navy I was able to depoy as long as I was diet controled or on oral meds. Insulin was a no go. I'm still on oral meds and diet controled (poorly).
Type 2 - Diagnosed 1998, A1c 9.3 Sept 2
Glipizide 5mg x 2 twice daily, Metphormin 1000mg twice daily,Gabapentin 400mg x3 3times daily
Valsartan 320mg daily, Amlodipine Besylate 10mg daily, Hydroxyzine Pamoate 50mg every 6hrs
Asprin 81 daily, Tramadol 50mg x2 three times daily, Ibuprofn 800mg 3 times daily
Nefazodone 200mg x2 nightly, Lantus 40 units nightly
Status: Regaining control :o

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#4
sgtstevens1029

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Thanks for the help. Do you know how I would go about getting my old records from when I was in the Marine Corps.

#5
TomB

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Best bet is to goto your state's web site and then to their Veterans Affairs office. That office will have a listing of Veteran's Service Officers (VSO) by county. Contact yours and he/she will get you going in the right direction. It is good to know that the VSO is a State run operation, not federal, and therefore is more inclined to be helpful.
Tom

#6
kgm0612

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Welcome to the forum, SgtStevens!

Karen

#7
dbaratta

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Ok so i am new to this and not sure what to do or where to post things. I am in the national guard and am supposed to be deploying soon but I have nowfound out that i might not be able to because of my rtype 2 diabetes. Does anyone know if there is a loop hole or something to get me through SRP? Anywhere that I can print out info to take with me that says soldiers with type 2 diabetes can deploy. I hope someone can help me. Thanks


Oh gee that is no fun for you but I gotta tell you with my experience with highs and lows of diabetes it is better for you and other troops that you stay home or lay low....ugh. Don't be mad at me for saying that but it is just my personal experience talking here....just me. Can't you go and not wheel a weapon? Just help in some other ways? I really don't know military stuff.....just talkin' smack here. :(
A1C JULY 2010 5.9%
A1C March 2010 6.2%
Lantus 16 units split dose
Novolog as needed


:aetsch:

#8
yannah

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I agree with Barbarians idea.

its seems alot of type 2 on orals can go ahead with these kind of things as going low is pretty unlikely.

so I wouldn't give up yet.
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#9
aokusman

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Ok so i am new to this and not sure what to do or where to post things. I am in the national guard and am supposed to be deploying soon but I have nowfound out that i might not be able to because of my rtype 2 diabetes. Does anyone know if there is a loop hole or something to get me through SRP? Anywhere that I can print out info to take with me that says soldiers with type 2 diabetes can deploy. I hope someone can help me. Thanks


How did they find out? were you sick and had to go to the doctor?
A1c 7.3 August 2009
A1c 5.7 October 2009

#10
azwildcat72

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I am also currently in the same situation, I was diagnosed as type 2 in July. I am currently in the Air Guard both military and civil service. I was diagnosed by my civilian doctor, and haven’t informed the military, for fear of losing both positions, military and civilian, since they’re tied together.

Now should I wait to inform them in June, when my next physical is due, or should I wait until they find out on their own? BG has been between 70-120, with medication and not much exercise. I have a total of 18 years military and 8 years currently in my civil service position, I would hate to lose my job because of this. Both the wife and I are freaking out, that I may be kicked out.

#11
Joeprep4820

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I know Type I's are a no-go for the military. Since I was born my goal was to attend the US Naval Academy, and was never told T1 Diabetes would prohibit me from doing so, and was always told that I would have been able to, even by my father, who was a US Naval Academy grad. Anyways, they found out I was diabetic, and was immediately told I was mentally and physically unfit to become an officer in the United States Navy.

For T2's I am sure there are exceptions.
Georgetown University Class of 2008
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Type I Diabetic since 1988
Pumper since 2007
12/09 A1C - 5.7
Complication free and keeping it that way
Go Hoyas!

#12
KimberlyType1

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You can not deploy. My dad had this issue with some of his soilders, before they deployed they found out two tested positive for type 2. It is a liablity. They will not take it on. Just think of all that is happening then ad being sick on top of that. Your health can put others at risk. I am sorry to tell you but you can not go. Take is as a blessing or a curse. Thank you for serving us. MY heart goes out to you.

Signed a true Army brat, all grown up

#13
TomB

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azwildcat72 -

Your oral meds might help you pass your next physical since your fasting glucose is within range. Uou'll have a problem when you truthfully answer questions about the meds you're taking.
By now, I'm sure you've read the rules, regs and restrictions that apply to T2's piloting an aircraft. Odds are that some major changes are in your near future. Every once in awhile a C-130 drones overhead. I miss not being up there. But I want you to start looking at some of the good news that's mixed in with the bad.
1. By controlling diabetes, you've drastically reduced the chances of complications: eye sight problems, atherosclerosis, ED, having bad judgment or passing out at an inconvenient moment.
2. You have the ability to change so it's time to make one or two. The change might not be good, but the ability to change, that is always good.
3. With proper documentation, you can still fly private. Take the wife out for a spin.
Best to you,
Tom

#14
tevepaughs

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Ok so i am new to this and not sure what to do or where to post things. I am in the national guard and am supposed to be deploying soon but I have nowfound out that i might not be able to because of my rtype 2 diabetes. Does anyone know if there is a loop hole or something to get me through SRP? Anywhere that I can print out info to take with me that says soldiers with type 2 diabetes can deploy. I hope someone can help me. Thanks


My husband has type 2 also and he deployed (army) for 15 months and he returned home from Iraq 1 year ago and he is SRC as of now and they just told us as of Oct. 2009 Diabetic soldiers are not allowed to deploy over to the war setting but are allowed to deploy to places like Haiti to help. As long as you keep your diabetes in check you can stay national guard or active. We have been national guard for many years and then we went Active Duty for years now. So don't worry you can stay in. I hope this helps.

#15
acevendetta

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so im currently in the marine corps & i wanted to know if there is a chance i can get medically seperated for being a diabetic who uses insulin???? please help!!

#16
Patriots62

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I am newly diagnosed T2 and am at a forward deployed location (as a contractor and retiree) and the med clinic is happily providing for me. All the meds and testing have been readily provided to me with no problem. I do believe my doc (a Army Guard Major) said there were soldiers here also with T2. His is well informed (it seems) on diabetes treatment and I am happy with him so far. The biggest difficulty will be carb management at military dining facilities--that is what I face.

Now, is this location unique? Perhaps and it is not a direct confrontation location so perhaps the Army Guard rules are a bit different here. I retired from the Air Force and had airmen working for me that were T2 and there was no problem for them being active as long as it was controllable.

I suggest each of you look into this anomynously if possible. Most services require a medical review board for service eligibility and that ruling has a wide range of decisions to include staying on active duty with limited deployability.

Take heart please as your service is duly needed and NOT everyone can deploy--someone has to watch the home front! :)

Thanks for your sacrifice in protecting us all!

Patriots62

#17
Steven S

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SgtStevens -
I've had Type 1 for 20+ yrs. I got in the Guard in Texas in 1988, was diagnosed the next year. At that time, I was told I was retainable since it was pre-existing condition. I figured that being in the Guard meant that I would never be deployed, so no issues at that time. In 2004, my unit was tasked with a deployment to Afghanistan. Naturally, I didn't pass the SRP and went back to one weekend a month and the two week AT. Found out in 2008 that the unit I was in was slated to deploy to Afghanistan in 2010. This time, I researched the regulations, found out what I needed to do be able to submit a waiver - had to have A1C under 7.0, tight control, letters from Commanders, etc. I got all that, submitted the waiver and got it approved in September of 2009. In March 2010, the rules changed and I was told that I wasn't going to deploy. I resubmitted the waiver, this time stating that my Commander and the unit were counting on me to deploy, got the letters, wrote an appear. Was approved in June 2010 and we deployed the next month. We just got back from Afghanistan in July 2011. No problems with the diabetes. I had sufficient insulin, testing supplies, etc; I also maintained communication with the pharmacy back at the Mob Platform in case I had any issues. Of course, it was a bit easier to argue w/the regulations that I'm a staff officer, I was at a more established base and had pretty good access to what I needed. As I understand it, the case against insulin dependent diabetics from the military's standpoint is that there's not the medical support structure in a warzone and the access to insulin and availability of the right type of food. If you're on a FOB that may run out of food and you're forced to eat MREs for a few days, then that would be an issue. There were other diabetics around, but none that were insulin dependent.
My suggestion is to research the regulations, talk to your medical officer, make sure your commander knows how important it is to you to deploy and keep your diabetes in good control. That's my perspective from the Guard side; the Active Component may take a different approach, but it's worth a try if it's that important to you. It was to me and I'm glad I did it.
Good luck.

#18
TomB

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Thank you for your service, Steven S and all you others. Adding diabetes to all the other "inconveniences" of an Afghanistan deployment is an inspiration to us home bound civies and to the other diabetics in the Service. As your retirement time approaches, you may want to insure that your diabetes will be considered as service connected. That way, your meds will continue to be provided by the VA. You'll also get a few extra bucks per month.
Your experience may be valuable to others. Perhaps you could write it up to provide info and guidance and have it posted.
Thanks again!
S/Sgt TB

#19
Luke

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I was diagnosed while in the military and was medically discharged. They gave me disability from it, but I would have loved to have been able to stay in.


31 years old
Diagnosed 10-28-2005
Type 1
Insulins-Lantus and Novalog


#20
Chaseg08

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Thread revival!!!! Ha ha. I had not seen this thread prior to today. I was diagnosed by the VA right after I got out of the Navy. I was dealing with the Air National guard and trying to get them to take me. They didn't want to because I have a rob and three screws in my right tibia (even though I ran a 9:17 mile and a half). The diabetes sealed my fate. It was a solid "No".

Anyway, has anyone ever thought of a military section on this forum? Seeing as there are quite a few of us on here and knowing there are more to come, it might be a big help to those who are headed this way. I know I had a ton of VA health care related questions when I was first diagnosed and being that I have just been through the whole process I feel like I could help someone out going through it now.
-Chase


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