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Does Diabetes make people real Nervous or Shakey?

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#1
Rob43

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Hi, It seems when I play video game with alot action it makes me real shakey for some reason more now then in the past. I was pulled over by police one day for a expire Licence plate tag and it made me real nervous and shakey for some reason. The policeman asked me if I was on illegal drugs because I was shaking like leaf. I was on way to my Diabetic doctor that day when he stopped me. The policeman was glad that I wear a medical ID tag around my neck to tell him that I'm a diabetic and on blood thinner.

Thanks, Rob.

#2
duck

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Never tell an officer you are diabetic...
Look what you've done to this rock-n-roll clown!

#3
duck

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I've not heard of diabetes making anyone real nervous or shakey, but that's just me...But I have heard of people getting real nervous and shakey when pulled over by the law, whether or not they are diabetic!

Now, about NEVER telling a cop you are diabetic: Here in the Metro DC area in the late 90's there were numerous incidents involving diabetics and reckless driving. One diabetic drove a semi off the road, into a building, at the cops trying to subdue him, and then when they caught up with him and beat him down because he was fighting with them, he sued the police.

I say "F" him (sorry to those who are offended)--If you are so incapable of controlling your diabetes while diving, you shouldn't drive. And the local lawmakers around here changed the laws real fast to punish diabetics who drive with their blood sugars in dangerous ranges; You can lose your license and be jailed much like driving under the influence here in VA. if I remember right, if you claim to be diabetic and are low when pulled over, you automatically lose your license for one year.

So, do NOT tell a cop you are a diabetic without him/her asking.

#4
soremom

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I test before I drive, even for short distances. Before I went on back on the pump, I was having a very bad time for lows. Would be perfectly fine, over 100, and could drop very low in a short amount of time without feeling it. I would never get behind the wheel of a car if I were low. Then again, if someone is low they may do things they would never do if they weren't. Sorry but it has happened.

I live in Pennsylvania. This happened to me one day when my then 2 yr old was in the car with me. I got to my parents house and got parked, don't remember getting there but do remember but my son in the car to go 5 blocks to my home. I don't know how long it was before they realized I was there. It was July, I turned the car off and left the windows up. We were both completely out of it by the time helped arrived. In our town if you call 911 you get fire, police and ambulance. The police were there and the cop had to drive the ambulance as the 2 paramedics were tending to my son and myself. Probably one of the toughest cops was the one who drove and I expected that I would lose my license or here something from them. Nothing was ever done. So not all cops consider that you have committed some kind of crime by getting behind the wheel. I nearly killed my son and myself, so it was very serious.

I would not hesitate to tell someone that I was diabetic. Yes it is like someone driving drunk but it is different and the circumstances can be different.

Kim

#5
duck

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I test before I drive, even for short distances. Before I went on back on the pump, I was having a very bad time for lows. Would be perfectly fine, over 100, and could drop very low in a short amount of time without feeling it. I would never get behind the wheel of a car if I were low. Then again, if someone is low they may do things they would never do if they weren't. Sorry but it has happened.

I live in Pennsylvania. This happened to me one day when my then 2 yr old was in the car with me. I got to my parents house and got parked, don't remember getting there but do remember but my son in the car to go 5 blocks to my home. I don't know how long it was before they realized I was there. It was July, I turned the car off and left the windows up. We were both completely out of it by the time helped arrived. In our town if you call 911 you get fire, police and ambulance. The police were there and the cop had to drive the ambulance as the 2 paramedics were tending to my son and myself. Probably one of the toughest cops was the one who drove and I expected that I would lose my license or here something from them. Nothing was ever done. So not all cops consider that you have committed some kind of crime by getting behind the wheel. I nearly killed my son and myself, so it was very serious.

I would not hesitate to tell someone that I was diabetic. Yes it is like someone driving drunk but it is different and the circumstances can be different.

Kim


You're correct in that it is up to the discretion of the officer...And I am a bit torn about this issue. On the one hand, I feel that a diabetic like the truck driver in my previous post ruins it for all of us, and deserved to have his license revoked. On the other, if merely mentioning the word "diabetic" or "diabetes" can call down the wrath of the Long Arm of the Law during a traffic stop, that smells like a violation of personal liberties to me...But lawyers will tell you it is no different than being asked if you are drunk or noting that your seatbelt was not fastened.

Sigh. Another component of our affliction to worry about.

#6
am1977

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I'm not sure if this is related to what you are talking about, but I find that when my numbers dip into a low range, I get very jittery. I'm not just talking physically. I mean, I have trouble forming sentences. I stutter and the words just don't come out right. It's very strange, but it is something I have noticed in the past.
I’ve faced myself
To cross out what I’ve become
Erase myself
And let go of what I’ve done

Put to rest
What you thought of me
Well I cleaned this slate
With the hands
Of uncertainty

So let mercy come
And wash away
What I’ve done

I’ve faced myself
To cross out what I’ve become
Erase myself
And let go of what I’ve done

Linkin Park~ "What I've Done" :thrasher:

#7
duck

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I'm not sure if this is related to what you are talking about, but I find that when my numbers dip into a low range, I get very jittery. I'm not just talking physically. I mean, I have trouble forming sentences. I stutter and the words just don't come out right. It's very strange, but it is something I have noticed in the past.


Those are classic symptoms of being low, that's a good point!

Rob, what kind of game makes your jittery? We still play Half-Life at work during breaks, and lately a lot of us have to stop because it is literally making us sick and ready to throw up.

#8
nantomsuethom

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Thomas gets very shaky when he plays video games. Especially the racing games. Usually after about 15-20 min. of playing. His bg was always normal (above 100).

Now if he is playing and gets shaky he will stop and take a little break (usually to look up cheat codes :- )
Nancy

Thomas (13) diagnosed Sept 24th, 2003, a week before his 10th birthday, pumping since Deecember 2003 - Animas 1250

#9
LauRa Lu

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I get a little shakey when I play video games, I don't play them much but when I do play things like halflife, halo or the racing games I get some odd feelings after a while and just feel the need to take a break.

Could it be anything to do with concentrating hard? When having a hypo its hard to concentrate, so maybe a similar thing could be happening when we have a normal blood sugar but are concentrating too much... if that makes any sence :P

#10
Rob43

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Hi, What worried me about the police here in Cookeville is the Drug called Meth is out-of- control here. I think he might have thought I was on Meth. People on Meth Shake and are real nervous. I was on way to my doctor to have a Hemoglobin A1c Test and check my blood thinner INR. The doctor's office is a half mile from my home and this happend before end of year. The police here would never think of checking people for diabetes because a drunk driver can have 12 DUI's and the legal system doesn't do anything to these people. I hear all the time on my police scanner people having many DUI's and they nothing about it. Maybe some jail time but much. The jails are overcrowed here because of Meth problem.


Rob

#11
Brent44a

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Video games can make me nervous and shaky (Lara Croft deserves mention here). Being pulled over on a traffic stop probably would make me nervous and shaky. Hypoglycemia definitely makes me shaky. Now, being hypoglycemic while being pulled over after playing a tough video game, now that's a reason to be nervous and shaky. Somthing definitely to be avoided!

#12
Dewey

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Video games can make me nervous and shaky (Lara Croft deserves mention here). Being pulled over on a traffic stop probably would make me nervous and shaky. Hypoglycemia definitely makes me shaky. Now, being hypoglycemic while being pulled over after playing a tough video game, now that's a reason to be nervous and shaky. Somthing definitely to be avoided!

LMAO Brent.. :D
I don't really get jittery when playing video games (at least not usually). If pulled over, I'd get a little jittery (and frustrated, but not at the officer), but having a low (or even as my blood is dropping), does tend to make me feel those symptoms. However, this was Not Always the case. There were times (when I had reduced sensation) to lows that were coming on (because I seemed to be running low more consistently at that time). There was even one occasion where my hubby didn't know I was low until he saw me acting strangely (while driving). I refused to pull over and let him take the wheel, but luckily, I agreed to eating a Snickers, which helped fix me quite fast. Not everyone is lucky enough to feel those sensations or jitters prior to a low.

ALL my love, Carwy & Best wishes for many healthy years to come! :love:
Saying prayers for him & all our friends, every day.
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#13
MegaGirl42

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Well I would imagine that anyone would be nervous and shakey after being stopped/pulled over by the police. I know I do and did. I get nurvous even when a cop is driving behind me.

I dont play game much but I think that the intence concentration might make you a little shakey, espeically when its a close race or match.

Does anyone play any games online through their X box? If so do you want to meet up and play a game sometime? I think it would be fun to play some of you online! :D :D
~Jeana~

Type II Diabetic since December 2004

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#14
Harold

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Does Diabetes make people real Nervous or Shakey?

A hypo event would do it, but the circumstances you describe sound more like an Adrenaline surge than Diabetes.

#15
jeggeman31

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The only time I get shakey is when I drop below 70.
Jim
:egg:
Diagnosed April 1990
Pumping with my Omni Pod

Last A1C 10.5 ( May 2012 )
Diabetes & Endocrinology Center Of Ohio Website

The opinions expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily represent
those of my wife who runs our house and makes more important decisions
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#16
jeggeman31

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If you are so incapable of controlling your diabetes while diving, you shouldn't drive.


Now I check my sugar prior to getting into the car. However I did that once and my sugar was about 150. And for whatever reason within 30min my sugar dropped to 62. I did nothing that I would not do day to day. Just every so often people can't control the drop. I corrected mine and all was good.


Yes I am sure there are people out there that don't care but there are also people that do check and keep lows in control, but something happens and the sugar drops.
Jim
:egg:
Diagnosed April 1990
Pumping with my Omni Pod

Last A1C 10.5 ( May 2012 )
Diabetes & Endocrinology Center Of Ohio Website

The opinions expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily represent
those of my wife who runs our house and makes more important decisions
than I do

#17
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Now, about NEVER telling a cop you are diabetic: Here in the Metro DC area in the late 90's there were numerous incidents involving diabetics and reckless driving. One diabetic drove a semi off the road, into a building, at the cops trying to subdue him, and then when they caught up with him and beat him down because he was fighting with them, he sued the police.

I say "F" him (sorry to those who are offended)--If you are so incapable of controlling your diabetes while diving, you shouldn't drive. And the local lawmakers around here changed the laws real fast to punish diabetics who drive with their blood sugars in dangerous ranges; You can lose your license and be jailed much like driving under the influence here in VA. if I remember right, if you claim to be diabetic and are low when pulled over, you automatically lose your license for one year.

So, do NOT tell a cop you are a diabetic without him/her asking.



As a citizen with a great deal of respect for, and close ties to, members of law enforcement, I cannot express how appalled I am by such comments. First, cops are not the enemy in these situations nor do they make the laws - they simply enforce them, which is their job. Second, these laws aren't passed to punish diabetics. The laws are passed with the intention of keeping the roads safe for everyone. If anyone feels the laws are unjust, they should contact their congress/senate representative an make an effort to stop the laws from being passed. Telling someone to never tell a cop they are diabetic could prevent or delay that person from getting medical treatment when they need it. It's like telling a child "that officer is going to put you in jail if you don't behave" as a means of discipline. If the child ever find him/herself in trouble (lost, kidnapped, etc), who will they turn to since parents have instilled in them a distrust of cops?

#18
jeggeman31

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.As a citizen with a great deal of respect for, and close ties to, members of law enforcement, Telling someone to never tell a cop they are diabetic could prevent or delay that person from getting medical treatment when they need it.


I work for the police department and they don't need to know unless I feel they should know. If I am having a medical emergency and the police should show up, then they should know to check for my meidcal alert that I wear. Then they will know and send me help. Other than that, again no need to know.
Jim
:egg:
Diagnosed April 1990
Pumping with my Omni Pod

Last A1C 10.5 ( May 2012 )
Diabetes & Endocrinology Center Of Ohio Website

The opinions expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily represent
those of my wife who runs our house and makes more important decisions
than I do

#19
Mark C

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As a citizen with a great deal of respect for, and close ties to, members of law enforcement, I cannot express how appalled I am by such comments. First, cops are not the enemy in these situations nor do they make the laws - they simply enforce them, which is their job. Second, these laws aren't passed to punish diabetics. The laws are passed with the intention of keeping the roads safe for everyone. If anyone feels the laws are unjust, they should contact their congress/senate representative an make an effort to stop the laws from being passed. Telling someone to never tell a cop they are diabetic could prevent or delay that person from getting medical treatment when they need it. It's like telling a child "that officer is going to put you in jail if you don't behave" as a means of discipline. If the child ever find him/herself in trouble (lost, kidnapped, etc), who will they turn to since parents have instilled in them a distrust of cops?


Yes, Cops very often ARE the enemy. I have seen too many badge-heavy idiots who think they are the law, when they are a witness for the law. Sorry, but your plea falls on deaf ears here.

December 17 I was making a perfectly legal crossing at a corner on a green light. The light turned red before I was halfway across this street. I walk with a GPS and I know where I was, and how fast I was wslking. I know where I saw the truck that came out of nowhere in a 45 MPH zone. He covered 729 feet in 7.2 seconds. That's 70 mph. He nearly hit me, and when I jumped out of the way, what I was carrying in my hand hit his truck.

The truck slammed in his brakes and took 278 feet to do it using his maximum braking capability. (Shows 70+ mph). Out pops a uniformed police officer from our county swearing at me, yada yada.... He wrests my arms behind me and tears my weakened shoulder from my socket, kicks my feet out from under me, and does a felony take down. (He whispers in my ear that he'll teach a pedestrain to jay walk...) I'm subjected to multiple officers on back up wiuth guns drawn. Reason:??? Throwing something at a vehicle is a "terroristic threat" in Georgia and a felony. Except I'm treated as a felon for something in my hands hitting the side of a passing car, from inside the middle of a street!

I'm never allowed to explain anything, and the seargent who shows up to back up the off duty officer won't even allow me to talk, but subjects me to the ranting of the off duty jerk.

This county is the worst. I have been improperly cited for speeding so many times because they are pulling everyone over for a quota in the "Wolf-pack" motorcycle teams...

Yes, virtually ALL my interaction with law enforcement proves them to be badge-heavy jerks. Even my friends and family who are LEOs are jerks about their job. Sorry, you're selling, but I ain't buying.

#20
jeggeman31

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I walk with a GPS


Just wondering why do you walk with a GPS? That is a first I have ever heard of someone walking with a GPS.
Jim
:egg:
Diagnosed April 1990
Pumping with my Omni Pod

Last A1C 10.5 ( May 2012 )
Diabetes & Endocrinology Center Of Ohio Website

The opinions expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily represent
those of my wife who runs our house and makes more important decisions
than I do




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