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Comparing Animas vs Medtronic pumps

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#1
DennisD

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I have been “pumping” for six years, the first five using a Medtronic Paradigm pump and now for the past year using an Animas Ping pump. If I simply compare pumps, feature for feature they are pretty much the same, Animas has a nicer display while Medtronic is easier to use (more logical button progressions, fewer steps to dial in and deliver a bolus).

The devil is in the details and taking these things into consideration, I would switch back to a Medtronic pump in a heartbeat. Here are the problems with the Animas pump:

Second Rate Glucose Meter. The Animas pump is paired with a One Touch meter, not surprising since the Animas Corporation is now owned by Johnson and Johnson, which makes One Touch meters. J&J’s Ping meter was designed to take on some of the functions of the pump and, according to Animas, to eventually totally replace all the pump functions. The problem is that the meter screen is incredibly difficult to read. Critical numbers like suggested bolus settings are displayed in 6 point type. Try distinguishing a 3 from an 8 in the middle of the night when your sugar is out of whack. In my opinion, this is a law suit waiting to happen.

Insufficient Pump Functionality. You would think that it would be possible to overcome the meter’s poor screen visibility by simply using the meter to set the bolus. While this is possible, Animas makes this more difficult than Medtronic does. After taking a meter test on the Medtronic system, the glucose reading is transmitted to the pump, the pump makes a suggested bolus calculation and the result of the calculation is entered into the bolus field in large, easy-to-read numbers. If you agree with the suggested bolus, one button push delivers it.

By contrast, the Animas pump receives the glucose reading from the meter but then does nothing with it. If you wish to use the internal pump’s bolus calculation you have to key in the meter reading manually with a series of arrow presses, confirm, wait for the calculation, read the result, key in the suggested bolus with another long series of arrow presses then finally confirm that to deliver the bolus. Each step in this process represents another chance for error, especially if your blood sugar is significantly elevated at the time you are going through all this, again, a law suit waiting to happen.

Limited Tech Support. Animas, like Medtronic, claims 24/7 tech support but the dirty little secret is that the techs at Animas go home at 5:00 pm Eastern and go into an on-call mode. If you make an evening call to Animas Tech Support, an operator will first try to determine if the problem can wait until tomorrow and, if not, will page an on-call technician. When I first got the pump I had a simple question one evening at 9:00 pm while changing a cartridge. It took the on-call tech 30 minutes to return my call. In 30 minutes, a Type I diabetic’s blood sugar can go up 200 points.

Poor Insurance Coordination. I am covered under a Michigan Blue Cross policy and through 5 years of pumping with Medtronic 100% of my supplies costs were covered. I was therefore quite surprised after my first supplies order from Animas that I received a bill for a $250 annual deductable plus a 10% copay of another $60. After several weeks of phone calls to both Blue Cross and Animas, I finally found out that Animas is not an approved DME (durable medical equipment) vendor with Michigan Blue Cross but Medtronic is approved. The only way to avoid the additional charges was to locate an approved middle-man who carried Animas supplies. In the meantime, Animas inadvertently shipped me a second order of supplies thus triggering more copays. Today, a year after receiving my Animas pump, I am still dealing with aspects of the supplies mess.

The bottom line is that I made a BIG mistake by switching from a Medtronic pump to an Animas pump.

Please note that I have talked to Animas engineers and executives about these problems. Everyone was sympathetic and admitted that my points were valid. To date, none of the root causes of these problems have been addressed.

#2
Subby

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Interesting post, thanks for sharing. User experience can seem to vary wildly with a lot of things: I've seen the most complaints about insurance stuffups about Minimed. Of course, that really doesn't say much, it's not like one can get a good statistical feel from posts on a board. What is useful is that people share so we can get some feel and gain some kind of insight.

I'm curious how you find a couple of features on the ping you don't get with the MM. Do you use the remote, and do you like it? What about bolus reminders, food database (or was that the Cosmo?)

How do you find luer lock vs paradigm connection? Not significantly different? What about sets, have you "stretched your legs" to the ones beyond the five or so that mm offer?

It's always interesting hearing pump reviews and criticism - as long as it doesn't get polarised along the lines of mac vs pc fervour. Me, I like hearing about experience, the options out there. I am pretty happy with my MM, very happy in some ways (such as the slow delivery), and I am mildy curious about some features it doesn't have, for instance the remote: I like that the pump is connected and that's that, it's all there, simple, nothing to lose or worry about. So I like to hear if people really do find it useful, and how they do. One day I will be replacing the pump, and I don't believe in mindless brand fanaticism... for anything.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#3
bruce58730

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I'm curious. You do not say why you changed pumps to begin with. In light of your unpleasant experience with the Ping it would be interesting to know why you left your MM. ???
****************
A1C 17.3 @ 1999 Heart Attack, then 2 more.
Order my PING today [6/17/09], my pancreas QUIT! Started Pumping 10/05/09 ;) :trytofly:
72 years with at least 30 more to go, if my wife lets me;) .
My opinions are just that. They are based on my life experiences and knowledge. Yours may differ, thats OK.

#4
spinnb7

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if the MM pump was treating you fine, then why switch? it sounds like you had not done enough homework on the animas pump before making the switch. I have used a ping for a year and a half now and have been very happy with it. no problems with my blue cross of florida coverage, but i checked with them before i tried to get a pump to make sure what they would and would not cover. also the rep from animas came to my house, and set set the pump up for me, coached me through it, and was super helpful.
not to sound like a jerk or anything, but we are talking about something you are going to be with 24/7, its not a tv or a dvd player, you should do more research on these things. i looked at a few different pumps, and for me the animas was going to be the best.
to each their own, but dont flame a company because of the consumers lack of research.

#5
Subby

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Come off it. The OP was hardly "flaming" Animas, they may be feeling a grievance but they have provided the reasons they feel that way and they framed everything in terms of why these things are problems for THEM. It was clearly personal opinion, and stated as such.

So you think you did/do things better - congratulations. The OP wasn't claiming to be perfect, just outlining some issues and disappointments they have come across. And I am grateful just for the actual information about such things as the tech support and the pump operations. As I said I may be making decisions at some stage, and this helps me with avenues for enquiry if and when I am.

I forgot, Dennis, welcome to the forum.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#6
Subby

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Dennis, an interesting point I have heard about the complication of bolus dosage and adjustment on pumps other than Minimed, is that MM patented the process of the straightforward Bolus Wizard - then sued everyone else for using it. Or something along those lines.

I don't know the truth of that, although my impression at the time was that it was more than a web myth. If it is true, then it doesn't actually change things for you, but it may be that the blame for that particular issue really lies in MM's court.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#7
telizas

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Insufficient Pump Functionality. You would think that it would be possible to overcome the meter’s poor screen visibility by simply using the meter to set the bolus. While this is possible, Animas makes this more difficult than Medtronic does. After taking a meter test on the Medtronic system, the glucose reading is transmitted to the pump, the pump makes a suggested bolus calculation and the result of the calculation is entered into the bolus field in large, easy-to-read numbers. If you agree with the suggested bolus, one button push delivers it.

By contrast, the Animas pump receives the glucose reading from the meter but then does nothing with it. If you wish to use the internal pump’s bolus calculation you have to key in the meter reading manually with a series of arrow presses, confirm, wait for the calculation, read the result, key in the suggested bolus with another long series of arrow presses then finally confirm that to deliver the bolus. Each step in this process represents another chance for error, especially if your blood sugar is significantly elevated at the time you are going through all this, again, a law suit waiting to happen.


I disagree that this is a minus. I would rather have to key in my own bolus after a suggestion than have it enter it for me. I can see a LOT of people taking each bolus suggestion as gospel and just enter it without thinking. I like being forced to think about it; I want to choose my bolus amount, instead of just relying on the pump to do it for me.

I agree that Animas' insurance handling is waaaay messed up. They did the same thing to me, and are now giving me the run-around about getting it resolved. Had they just gone through Edgepark, I would be a happy camper. They didn't and now THEY don't know what to do.

I can't really speak to anything else. I really, really like my inset infusion sets and am happy overall with the pump and the meter.
Type 2, Insulin Resistant, Metformin didn't work for me! Pumping insulin with a One Touch Ping! :D

#8
Subby

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It may be just the way I work, but I will have already predicted roughly what the pump is likely to suggest by the time I get to the suggested screen, and will already have made up my mind if I'm going to leave it be or if I will change it. If changing it, I thank the deities that it's a simple streamlined process... I get really impatient with extra steps.

Not disagreeing with you Telizas, you may well be right with your theory that for some it stops them thinking. (Although I think they should probably pay more attention as pumpers overall if they pay no attention to dosing and it impacts on their control.)

But I can really understand the OPs position, coming from being used to the recommendation being straight up, to having extra steps, I would have an "urgh" reaction stick with me as well. It's lousy if, as I mentioned, it is in fact MM's fault other pumps work that way.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#9
spinnb7

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"Each step in this process represents another chance for error, especially if your blood sugar is significantly elevated at the time you are going through all this, again, a law suit waiting to happen."

a law suit waiting to happen? really? because of user negligence?
granted I will say it is not really the best use of the ping meter technology for the pump to not really do anything with the BG reading from the one touch. i honestly have only used the bolus from the meter maybe twice. it is no big deal for me to check my blood sugar, and then use my pump to give myself my bolus. never had an error using an up or down button. not sure what kind of chance of error there is unless i was blind.
i might be mistaken, but they way the FDA approval goes for medical devices is that they can change one thing and get approval pretty easily, but if they change 3 or 4 it could take forever to get the approval. so maybe they are working on eventually having the cgms (dexcom 7) work with the pump to administer bolus or correct for high/ low BG.
minimed has their menu options patented. that is why their menu is different from animas,
but for me it is no question, the animas pump is much more waterproof than the minimed.
again, i cannot imagine anyone getting a $6000 piece of medical equipment that requires so many additional supplies without checking with their insurance as to if it would be covered or not. saying it is a lawsuit waiting to happen sounds victim like.

#10
henry2002

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Thanks for pointing out things that you feel are issues with your Animas pump. I recently started pumping and chose a MM Paradigm 522. I am very happy with it and find it easy to use but since it is my first pump I always wonder if there may be a better one out there. I did a lot of research before making my decision to go with MM but I thnik it is only normal to wonder about the competitors. You have convinced me that I have definetly made the right decision to go with MM. I hope you are able to resolve the issues with your Animas pump.

#11
butterflykisses

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First of all, this is your first post and decide to "compare" the two pumps. That's a little suspicious to me, maybe I'm wrong, but it sounds like there's an agenda to me.

Second Rate Glucose Meter. The Animas pump is paired with a One Touch meter, not surprising since the Animas Corporation is now owned by Johnson and Johnson, which makes One Touch meters. J&J’s Ping meter was designed to take on some of the functions of the pump and, according to Animas, to eventually totally replace all the pump functions. The problem is that the meter screen is incredibly difficult to read. Critical numbers like suggested bolus settings are displayed in 6 point type. Try distinguishing a 3 from an 8 in the middle of the night when your sugar is out of whack. In my opinion, this is a law suit waiting to happen.

The MM is also paired with OneTouch, the difference is the meter packaging. I would agree the screen is hard to see in certain light situations, but it's nothing a back light can't fix. The size of the font is not hard to see unless you need glasses. If you can't distinguish a 3 and 8, which is no where near the size shown above, you should be wearing glasses before making adjustments. Its ridiculous to state there are "lawsuits waiting to happen".

Insufficient Pump Functionality. You would think that it would be possible to overcome the meter’s poor screen visibility by simply using the meter to set the bolus. While this is possible, Animas makes this more difficult than Medtronic does. After taking a meter test on the Medtronic system, the glucose reading is transmitted to the pump, the pump makes a suggested bolus calculation and the result of the calculation is entered into the bolus field in large, easy-to-read numbers. If you agree with the suggested bolus, one button push delivers it.

By contrast, the Animas pump receives the glucose reading from the meter but then does nothing with it. If you wish to use the internal pump’s bolus calculation you have to key in the meter reading manually with a series of arrow presses, confirm, wait for the calculation, read the result, key in the suggested bolus with another long series of arrow presses then finally confirm that to deliver the bolus. Each step in this process represents another chance for error, especially if your blood sugar is significantly elevated at the time you are going through all this, again, a law suit waiting to happen.

the whole point of having the meter/remote is to not have to pull out the pump in the first place. Its much more convenient to bolus from the meter...take my blood sugar, use one of the wizards to calculate my bolus and deliver it, all from the meter. Are there more button pushes than needed? Yes. Is it REALLY that big a deal, no. "more chances to make mistakes", I don't think so. I think the "lawsuit waiting to happen" would be over following a suggested bolus that was wrong. Both pumps suggest, Animas makes you confirm you're okay with the suggestion.

Limited Tech Support. Animas, like Medtronic, claims 24/7 tech support but the dirty little secret is that the techs at Animas go home at 5:00 pm Eastern and go into an on-call mode. If you make an evening call to Animas Tech Support, an operator will first try to determine if the problem can wait until tomorrow and, if not, will page an on-call technician. When I first got the pump I had a simple question one evening at 9:00 pm while changing a cartridge. It took the on-call tech 30 minutes to return my call. In 30 minutes, a Type I diabetic’s blood sugar can go up 200 points.

MM's support sucked for me. Others have nothing but rave reviews. I bet Animas users have the same mixed reviews. Because no matter what pump you use it can fail, at all hours, it will not matter much whether you can talk to someone right away or not...its the pumpers responsibility to know what to do to treat a high...like instead waiting for my glucose to rise to 200 or more I would get out a syringe and vial and prevent it instead of sitting around waiting for someone to tell me what to do, this is pump user info 101.

Poor Insurance Coordination. I am covered under a Michigan Blue Cross policy and through 5 years of pumping with Medtronic 100% of my supplies costs were covered. I was therefore quite surprised after my first supplies order from Animas that I received a bill for a $250 annual deductable plus a 10% copay of another $60. After several weeks of phone calls to both Blue Cross and Animas, I finally found out that Animas is not an approved DME (durable medical equipment) vendor with Michigan Blue Cross but Medtronic is approved. The only way to avoid the additional charges was to locate an approved middle-man who carried Animas supplies. In the meantime, Animas inadvertently shipped me a second order of supplies thus triggering more copays. Today, a year after receiving my Animas pump, I am still dealing with aspects of the supplies mess.

I don't know why your insurance issue is Animas' fault? Your insurance company could have told you with one phone call why you weren't getting full coverage. You should have sent back the order to Animas when they sent you more supplies. Because Customer service involves humans and humans make mistakes, there will always be issues with ALL companies. I had NOTHING but trouble with MM and billing and was one of the reasons why I left them. Customer service was another. The proprietary system is yet another (and also what has got them into their supply mess).
Katherine
type 1 (1.5) 12 years, Pumper 6 1/2 years? or so.

#12
butterflykisses

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I like that the pump is connected and that's that, it's all there, simple, nothing to lose or worry about. So I like to hear if people really do find it useful, and how they do. One day I will be replacing the pump, and I don't believe in mindless brand fanaticism... for anything.


I almost exclusively use the remote to bolus. Its very convenient since I'm testing my BG, its already out, ready to use. I rarely set a bolus from my pump with exception to using the audio bolus button...not really sure what it's actually "called". I use that feature when I decide to eat "just a little more". It reminds me of my MM remote days, listening for the beeps, but I can do it by feel and through my SPIbelt, so its convenient.
Katherine
type 1 (1.5) 12 years, Pumper 6 1/2 years? or so.

#13
JungleJim

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Don't have an Animas or MM, but I have been using Animas for all my supplies for my Cozmo for a couple of years, and have had no problems with "insurance coordination". In fact I have received fantastic service and not a single billing issue. So to broadly state "Poor Insurance Coordination" in your first post and then split is a little much.

I give you credit though for having a lot of thought-out and ready information for someone's first and only post.

#14
telizas

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again, i cannot imagine anyone getting a $6000 piece of medical equipment that requires so many additional supplies without checking with their insurance as to if it would be covered or not.


He's not saying it wasn't covered. I had the same issue. Animas pumps ARE covered, but ONLY if you go through a 3rd-party provider. With my insurance, even a Minimed would have had to have been through a third party provider, but Animas screwed up and didn't go through that provider.

Your arguments hold no water if you're not understanding it.
Type 2, Insulin Resistant, Metformin didn't work for me! Pumping insulin with a One Touch Ping! :D

#15
kavman47

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Regarding Animas Ping versus the MM.... it all depends on what your used to.

I did a lot of research before ditching my faithful Cozmo shortly before the 4 year warranty ran out, and I ended up choosing the Animas Ping. Why?

1. I have poor eyesight and, for me, the Ping pump was ba far and away the easiest to read. The MM font was terrible, and way too small.

2. Coming from a Cozmo, I had the opposite reaction as far as "menu flow" goes. I found the Animas Ping pump and meter screens very easy to figure out, and found the MM harder to figure out.

(Yes, I had helpful reps from both companies come to my house, and they both did an excellent job of displaying their pumps, and let me try out various functions.)

I agree, there are times when I miss the "bolus wizard" feature (Cozmo also had this)...but I also appreciate how easy it is to increase or decrease the bolus before delivery with the Ping.

I agree, the meter is horribly hard to read, but I've learned how to hold it "just so" to make it easier to read.

As has been said elsewhere...do EXTENSIVE research before getting a pump (or before switching). Get a "hands on" demo of each pump, and then make up your own mind.

No pump system is perfect...each have their good and bad points.

#16
notme

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1. I have poor eyesight and, for me, the Ping pump was ba far and away the easiest to read. The MM font was terrible, and way too small.

No pump system is perfect...each have their good and bad points.


Of all the complaints about MiniMed, this is the most true statement for me. The screen on the pump is absolutely too small. The letters are black and the screen grey. Dumb idea. I would love to see a more clear, larger, color screen.

The service dept has for the most part been fine with me. I had more trouble with EdgePark than I did with MiniMed. Went back to them for my supplies.

As you can see, asking only gives you mixed reviews. However, you might see something in the replies that hits a nerve with you.
maxwellsmiles1.jpg



Nancy


“I don't expect everything to be handed to me. Just set it down anywhere.”.




diagnosed type 1 October 1986
currently using Medtronic MiniMed
Revel 723 with CGMS
CLEAR [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#17
Lizzy

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[ After several weeks of phone calls to both Blue Cross and Animas, I finally found out that Animas is not an approved DME (durable medical equipment) vendor with Michigan Blue Cross but Medtronic is approved.



Is your BCBS through one of the auto companies? After the big GM change, Animas told me that I would have to go with an approved DME provider. When I called the company they referred me to they told me to just tell Animas that I am with the GM insurance. I told them and they are now supplying my supplies and billing BCBS for their part of payment again.
Liz from Michigan
dxed 6/64 - pumping with Animas 1250 since 11/09/06

#18
RayVendryes

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I have been “pumping” for six years, the first five using a Medtronic Paradigm pump and now for the past year using an Animas Ping pump. If I simply compare pumps, feature for feature they are pretty much the same, Animas has a nicer display while Medtronic is easier to use (more logical button progressions, fewer steps to dial in and deliver a bolus).

The devil is in the details and taking these things into consideration, I would switch back to a Medtronic pump in a heartbeat. Here are the problems with the Animas pump:

Second Rate Glucose Meter. The Animas pump is paired with a One Touch meter, not surprising since the Animas Corporation is now owned by Johnson and Johnson, which makes One Touch meters. J&J’s Ping meter was designed to take on some of the functions of the pump and, according to Animas, to eventually totally replace all the pump functions. The problem is that the meter screen is incredibly difficult to read. Critical numbers like suggested bolus settings are displayed in 6 point type. Try distinguishing a 3 from an 8 in the middle of the night when your sugar is out of whack. In my opinion, this is a law suit waiting to happen.

Insufficient Pump Functionality. You would think that it would be possible to overcome the meter’s poor screen visibility by simply using the meter to set the bolus. While this is possible, Animas makes this more difficult than Medtronic does. After taking a meter test on the Medtronic system, the glucose reading is transmitted to the pump, the pump makes a suggested bolus calculation and the result of the calculation is entered into the bolus field in large, easy-to-read numbers. If you agree with the suggested bolus, one button push delivers it.

By contrast, the Animas pump receives the glucose reading from the meter but then does nothing with it. If you wish to use the internal pump’s bolus calculation you have to key in the meter reading manually with a series of arrow presses, confirm, wait for the calculation, read the result, key in the suggested bolus with another long series of arrow presses then finally confirm that to deliver the bolus. Each step in this process represents another chance for error, especially if your blood sugar is significantly elevated at the time you are going through all this, again, a law suit waiting to happen.

Limited Tech Support. Animas, like Medtronic, claims 24/7 tech support but the dirty little secret is that the techs at Animas go home at 5:00 pm Eastern and go into an on-call mode. If you make an evening call to Animas Tech Support, an operator will first try to determine if the problem can wait until tomorrow and, if not, will page an on-call technician. When I first got the pump I had a simple question one evening at 9:00 pm while changing a cartridge. It took the on-call tech 30 minutes to return my call. In 30 minutes, a Type I diabetic’s blood sugar can go up 200 points.

Poor Insurance Coordination. I am covered under a Michigan Blue Cross policy and through 5 years of pumping with Medtronic 100% of my supplies costs were covered. I was therefore quite surprised after my first supplies order from Animas that I received a bill for a $250 annual deductable plus a 10% copay of another $60. After several weeks of phone calls to both Blue Cross and Animas, I finally found out that Animas is not an approved DME (durable medical equipment) vendor with Michigan Blue Cross but Medtronic is approved. The only way to avoid the additional charges was to locate an approved middle-man who carried Animas supplies. In the meantime, Animas inadvertently shipped me a second order of supplies thus triggering more copays. Today, a year after receiving my Animas pump, I am still dealing with aspects of the supplies mess.

The bottom line is that I made a BIG mistake by switching from a Medtronic pump to an Animas pump.

Please note that I have talked to Animas engineers and executives about these problems. Everyone was sympathetic and admitted that my points were valid. To date, none of the root causes of these problems have been addressed.


I'm looking at options. Using MM for 8 yrs but like the remote of Animas and waterproof. Waiting to hear about ins. coverage from Animas. MM is covered 100% so can't go wrong with that. Als glucose testing is a factor. Report producing with my Freestyle is local (computer). Animas is web based. No internet - no report.

#19
Subby

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Look very closely into the waterproof issue. MM are also officially covered for water resistant: up to a couple of feet I believe, so unless you plan on swimming with the pump it may not really matter. MM's line is something like that no pump should be considered water proof, because any pump can fail from water pressure. AFAIK if your pump fails from water damage, you will get it replaced, whether MM or Animas. I don't know the details: like I say - look very closely into the waterproof issue if that is a deciding factor, as there may not actually be that much difference between them.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#20
Gladtobehere

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I have only used the Animas Ping and will continue to do so. It functions adequately and I do like the meter remote and use it almost exclusively to bolus.

The monochrome display of all Onetouch meters was always horrible since the first meter some 10 or 15 years back. HOWEVER, the most recent PING units in Canada have a Onetouch meter with a wonderful color screen just like the pump. (Unfortunately it will cost me a few hundred bucks to upgrade) I suspect/I am pretty sure the color screen will use a lot more battery power.

24/7 service is questionable, but I have had good and bad experiences.

I do like the Leur Lock, BUT watch out, even though my experience with sets tells me that leur locks will connect, they are NOT all created equal and there may be minor issues using NON ANIMAS recommended sets. They work, but.................

Waterproof? I have gone swimming a few times with the PING. It is waterproof dow to 6 or 8 feet (2 meters) in my experience. BUT I try to remove the pump if possible before swimming.

I do believe that Medical approval is what seriously delays most product improvement changes. Keep in mind that these pumps are used around the world, so it is not just US approval. And Canada is even slower that the States, not to mention typically not even starting until the US has approvred.

BUT, I do agree that the PING seems to have WAY TOO MANY wasted button pushes. And that the operating software/firmware in the pump and for the PC (stats, etc) really need to improve and move into this century.

I found that the initial learning curve for pumping was at least 3 months for the basics and even longer as you learn more and more.

I DO NOT believe that research on a pump will tell you all you need to know in order to select the best pump for yourself. I believe you need to try it! Yeah do the research and select the major features you like, but then try it........As far as I know these pumps all seem to work.

The PING works for me and only annoys me once or twice a year, so I use it.

BTW: COST? is outrageous. A motor driven syringe with a programmable time is all that a pump is. OH the Pimg has a meter and a BLUETOOTH like (not as good) connection. Just imagine paying $6000 for your smartphone. The COST is mostly profit. None of these companies are making pumps to help us out. They do it for PROFIT!




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