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#1
flenderson

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Hello everyone,
I went to the doctor for my physical yesterday and she went over my bloodwork and she gave me the diagnosis of being a pre-diabetic (with a disposition toward type II).

A1c = 6.0
Glucose = 98

Everything else came back ok.

I am a male, 34 yrs old, 6'0" tall, weigh about 175 lbs. and am in relatively good shape.

I have a family history of diabetes (dad's side) - his brother (type I acquired at 21) and two sisters had type I (age 4 and 10) and his mom had type II (acquired later in life). He has 2 brothers and 6 sisters total (so 3 of 9 contracted diabetes).

My brother acquired type I diabetes at age 4.

My doctor has told me to basically eat/drink like a diabetic would and excercise daily - and to come back in 3 months to get my A1c level checked again............

I'm wondering (if anyone has any recommendation/advice) if this seems like I'm headed towards type II or what?

Thanks in advance for any comments.

#2
yannah

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hello, there is not a firm answer to your question.
that is a pre diabetic/diabetic A1c. pre diabetes starts at 5.6 and diabetes around 6.

so time to do some lifelstyle changes!
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#3
princesslinda

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Welcome flenderson!

If I were you, i'd view this as a wakeup call telling you that if you continue on the same path you are now, you may end up with T2 diabetes, as your A1C points to the fact that all is not totally normal.

Hopefully, by making some important lifestyle changes, you can avoid T2 diabetes altogether.

Since you do have a family history of T2 diabetes, i'd encourage you to have an annual physical to include an A1C.

Gretchen Becker, an author you'll see mentioned here a lot, has a book "PreDiabetes, What You Need To Know To Keep Diabetes at Bay." I've not read this particular book, but her T2 book was a great resource.

T2, diagnosed 8/31/06.
Meds: Metformin-ER 500 mg twice daily, HCTZ 12.5 mg every other day for BP Enalapril 20 mg 1 daily (ace-inhibitor)
Diet: I eat to my meter, generally eating 75-100 carbs/day with the occasional splurge.


#4
NewdestinyX

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Welcome Flenderson!

Sorry it's to the club no one wants to be a members of -- but welcome none the less.

Most all medical journals and Diabetes associations call an A1c of 6.0 -- full blown diabetes. No normal person would ever be that high and that's how you should focus your mind. 5.7 is the Prediabetes line and 6.0 is full blown. So I agree with Yannah. Start eating and exercising like a very early diagnosed T2 diabetic. And you'll keep everything in check. But you will never be able to eat carbs to any degree you want -- again. That would be the wrong attitude to adopt.. a wait and see. There is no wait and see with Diabetes. Once you're at 5.7 you're a pre diabetic.. once you're at 6.0 you have compromised pancreatic function. The tendency to get back to that place will be with you for the rest of your life. But you CAN totally control this disease -- even without meds when you catch it early -- with diet and exercise change. That's the good news!. Embrace it. Get moving exercise-wise 3-4 days a weak. If you're more aged -- even ankle weights and a walk around the block or around your house daily will make a huge difference. Then start changing your eating habits to focus more on proteins and good fats and green vegetables, which though they're carbs too, are good carbs and shouldn't spike your blood glucose (BG) levels.

Start moderating way down all the 'white' stuff: potatoes, pasta, rice, flour (grains/cereals) and all simple sugars like candy and cookies and soda and fruit juice, etc. Most people try to lower carbs; some very low.. like no more than 50g a day. Others of us are up around 100g/day and doin' great. Your body will 'yell at you' as you're making these eating changes so moderate down.. You're probably at 300-500g or carbs a day now. Start reading labels.. Look at the total carbohydrate gram count -- subtract out the Fiber grams and then count the rest. Learn to switch to diet drinks immediately.

You can do it.. But are you a 'diabetic' -- yep. Don't try to work your mind out of that distinction.

We're here for you. This is a GREAT place to come and get info and moral support. And grapple with all the studies about the best courses of action for you to adopt. It's not cut and dried -- and there are many approaches. But get used to telling yourself -- I am a person with diabetes. That's a huge first step.

Welcome!
Grant

Dx 7/15/09 - A1c 10.6 :o; 10/26/09-7.2 :); 1/20/10-5.7 :D; 4/10/10-5.6 [Bayer Home Test] :D
Meds: Metformin XR 500mg-2/day, Lantus 16iu morning, Diovan 80mg-1/day,
Nexium 40mg-2/day, D3 2000iu, B12 2500mcg; Diet: for now, low carb:<70g/day
Weight mngm't: Down 30 lbs since Dx :thumbsup: Exercise reg: Biking in combo w/ 45 min at gym 3-4x/week

#5
notme

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Hi flenderson and welcome to Diabetes Forums. I am sure you will find a lot of support and advice on this forum. Just jump right in, ask questions and research any approach you decide to take.

Your A1c does indicate that something is going on and you need to get going on control. You might be headed to type 2, but there is also the 1.5 type to research. Either way, the advice about exercise and avoidance of processed foods is going to help your next A1c. Whatever type you are, right now your goal should be keeping your numbers in lower range.

Diabetes is the one condition that makes us get healthy. Eat whole foods without labels, exercise and test your blood sugar often. You will discover what foods raise your blood sugar and which foods you can eat without a spike. Test before your meals and two hours after if you can. A morning blood sugar before you eat will give you a baseline for the day. Some fruits will spike your blood sugar, so make sure to test. We are all different in what we tolerate.

There are lots of ideas and suggestions here, try them and use the ones that work for you. Testing is key.

Good luck on your venture and welcome to our forums.
RIP My beautiful boy.

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currently using Medtronic MiniMed
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#6
NewdestinyX

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Flenderson,
I apologize -- I read your opening post too quickly and didn't remember that you explained your age and height and weight, etc.. You are atypical for a lot of T2's who usually have more exercise and weight loss to accomplish. As NotMe said -- you might have Type 1.5 which is a different type of diabetes, though with the same changes needed in lifestyle to keep up with it. A doctor can perform an antibody test for you to determine which type of diabetes you have -- though she may not want to do that now since your numbers are pretty good. The best reason to 'have it' done is to help you sort of know what's a head of you a little bit as T1.5's can tend to lose pancreatic beta cell mass (that produce's the body's insulin) faster than T2 diabetics. You seem to be in that more anomalous group of people that contract T1.5 or T2 diabetes despite a much younger age, and a much more healthy body type and a healthier lifestyle.

Just start making some good 'minor-major' changes in your eating style and that next A1c in three months should come down even more. Even modest changes for you would make a huge difference. With only a 6.0 and a fasting BG level of 98 it's unlikely you're a T1. But get a meter and some test strips and get to testing as soon as you can. Your doc can prescribe for the test strips for a certain meter.. Ask her/him to call in the scrip for testing a minimum of 6x a day. Your doc may consider that excessive -- but it is NOT. It's a necessity. And that's a minimum. For most of us in our early months of testing what foods do to us we need to test at 1 hour after first bite AND 2 hours after first bite and then of course before each meal. So that's a minimum of 9 tests a day. I used between 9 and 12 test strips a day when I started out and needed every one. They're expensive without insurance though you can supplement over and above what your doc orders for you on eBay. And if you want to get started immediately Walmart has a super cheap and reliable meter called the ReliOn Confirm or Micro for $12 and a bottle of 50 strips is only $21. So 100 a month is only $42 and a 150 a month is only $63. $64+ is the price of only 50 of them at most drug stores without insurance help on the more 'name brand' meters. The meter is always cheap -- it's the test strips is where they 'getcha'... Like printer cartridges. They give away printers for almost free... it's the ink that costs all the money.

Lots to learn.. I'll let others greet you too..

Be well!
Grant

Dx 7/15/09 - A1c 10.6 :o; 10/26/09-7.2 :); 1/20/10-5.7 :D; 4/10/10-5.6 [Bayer Home Test] :D
Meds: Metformin XR 500mg-2/day, Lantus 16iu morning, Diovan 80mg-1/day,
Nexium 40mg-2/day, D3 2000iu, B12 2500mcg; Diet: for now, low carb:<70g/day
Weight mngm't: Down 30 lbs since Dx :thumbsup: Exercise reg: Biking in combo w/ 45 min at gym 3-4x/week

#7
flenderson

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Thanks for all the insight.

Fyi, i am already changing my eating habits per the doctor's recommendations and am going to give this my best shot - what else can you do?..........

NewdestinyX,
Thanks for your reply - it is odd to me that my doc didn't even mention testing bg levels at all for the next three months .........especially given my family history of it. i may give her a call and see what she says about that.

She didn't mention anything about 1.5 - only type 2.....

#8
princesslinda

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You'll probably not find a doctor who'll encourage you to test very regularly. I know several T2 diabetics, I work with 4, have 2 in my immediate family....and none of them test very often...they are just not willing to do so....and when you don't test, it's easy to stop being accountable about what you're eating and that's a slippery slope to be on.

When I was diagnosed, I had an A1C of 9.6, and was told to test just once a day, fasting only. I soon realized I had to test more to understand how to manage things. Even 4 years in, I still test 4 times a day...fasting, pre-and-post meal (I choose a different meal each day) and random. I tested more frequently than this at first, but this works well for me now.

If you don't test, you won't see what foods cause you problems. You'll have to decide what amount works best for you and your goals.

Personally, I never did regular one hour testing, but it is a good idea, esp. when you are trying out a new food. Some foods can even cause your blood sugar to elevate AFTER the 2 hr reading, so on occasion, it might be good to take a 3 hr reading to see if it tells you anything useful.

T2, diagnosed 8/31/06.
Meds: Metformin-ER 500 mg twice daily, HCTZ 12.5 mg every other day for BP Enalapril 20 mg 1 daily (ace-inhibitor)
Diet: I eat to my meter, generally eating 75-100 carbs/day with the occasional splurge.


#9
NewdestinyX

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NewdestinyX,
Thanks for your reply - it is odd to me that my doc didn't even mention testing bg levels at all for the next three months .........especially given my family history of it. i may give her a call and see what she says about that.

She didn't mention anything about 1.5 - only type 2.....

Early diagnosed T2's - atypical for weight and age -- are one of the most common misdiagnoses. The course of action to follow is nearly identical so -- that's why most docs aren't particularly worried about it. If you're a 1.5 it just means your pancrease will 'likely' burn out a little quicker and you'll need to use insulin earlier. Another reason why the doc doesn't want to 'dive into it' as a topic too quick. But 'knowing' whether you're 1.5 or 2 isn't a 'life threatening' detail.

Knowing if you're T1 -- is... Though your numbers there upon first glance don't look T1'ish which have you wildly higher in most cases because T1 means your pancreas is totally dead to making insulin -- or nearly totally dead. You'd need to be on insulin immediately. It's a curiosity -- to know if you're T1.5 or even something called 'metabolic syndrome' which is a different type too that often gets grouped in with 1.5.

But making changes and starting with a meter is a must. The beauty of this disease and in turn this forum is there's so much you can learn and DO on your own. Your doc will be delighted at some level that you're taking it so seriously -- though you'll get 'rolled eyes' from some of your docs that you want to be so 'in control' with a meter. That always makes me laugh when they think we're 'overachieving' by wanting a meter at all. How else will you know what certain foods do to you without a meter.

Best example... potatoes don't raise my BG levels at all. It's a 'safe' food for me... NOT for many others..But I can't eat ANY bread.. others can. How would we know that without our meters???? I guess we could paint with a broad brush and stay away from ALL carbohydrates at all -- but what 'fun' is that..?? :D

So for now -- if you don't want to bother the doc -- just go to a Walmart Pharmacy and pick up a ReliOn Confirm for cheap and I think the WavePresto is also at Walmart and may even be cheaper.. The point it -- start testing.. Use the 'sides' of your fingers not the 'pad' to prick with the lancet -- stings WAY less. You'll get used to the finger prick in no time. No big thing at all..I started by pricking only my lower thigh near the knee cap or my forarm - but remember that the number those areas are reporting to you are delayed from 15-30 minutes from 'immediate'. Only finger tips are immediate. The knees and forearms for me had no sensation of pricking at all and that's why I stayed there longer.. When I started insulin (by choice) I needed an 'immediate' check on my BG level to prevent what are called 'hypos' -- which means going too low in your BG level.. Though without being on insulin or other pancreas stimulating oral meds 'going "hypo"' is a virtually non-existent worry. So you only pricking your lower thigh or forearm would be fine...

Good luck! and get started...
Grant

Dx 7/15/09 - A1c 10.6 :o; 10/26/09-7.2 :); 1/20/10-5.7 :D; 4/10/10-5.6 [Bayer Home Test] :D
Meds: Metformin XR 500mg-2/day, Lantus 16iu morning, Diovan 80mg-1/day,
Nexium 40mg-2/day, D3 2000iu, B12 2500mcg; Diet: for now, low carb:<70g/day
Weight mngm't: Down 30 lbs since Dx :thumbsup: Exercise reg: Biking in combo w/ 45 min at gym 3-4x/week

#10
flenderson

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Early diagnosed T2's - atypical for weight and age -- are one of the most common misdiagnoses. The course of action to follow is nearly identical so -- that's why most docs aren't particularly worried about it. If you're a 1.5 it just means your pancrease will 'likely' burn out a little quicker and you'll need to use insulin earlier. Another reason why the doc doesn't want to 'dive into it' as a topic too quick. But 'knowing' whether you're 1.5 or 2 isn't a 'life threatening' detail.

Knowing if you're T1 -- is... Though your numbers there upon first glance don't look T1'ish which have you wildly higher in most cases because T1 means your pancreas is totally dead to making insulin -- or nearly totally dead. You'd need to be on insulin immediately. It's a curiosity -- to know if you're T1.5 or even something called 'metabolic syndrome' which is a different type too that often gets grouped in with 1.5.

But making changes and starting with a meter is a must. The beauty of this disease and in turn this forum is there's so much you can learn and DO on your own. Your doc will be delighted at some level that you're taking it so seriously -- though you'll get 'rolled eyes' from some of your docs that you want to be so 'in control' with a meter. That always makes me laugh when they think we're 'overachieving' by wanting a meter at all. How else will you know what certain foods do to you without a meter.

Best example... potatoes don't raise my BG levels at all. It's a 'safe' food for me... NOT for many others..But I can't eat ANY bread.. others can. How would we know that without our meters???? I guess we could paint with a broad brush and stay away from ALL carbohydrates at all -- but what 'fun' is that..?? :D

So for now -- if you don't want to bother the doc -- just go to a Walmart Pharmacy and pick up a ReliOn Confirm for cheap and I think the WavePresto is also at Walmart and may even be cheaper.. The point it -- start testing.. Use the 'sides' of your fingers not the 'pad' to prick with the lancet -- stings WAY less. You'll get used to the finger prick in no time. No big thing at all..I started by pricking only my lower thigh near the knee cap or my forarm - but remember that the number those areas are reporting to you are delayed from 15-30 minutes from 'immediate'. Only finger tips are immediate. The knees and forearms for me had no sensation of pricking at all and that's why I stayed there longer.. When I started insulin (by choice) I needed an 'immediate' check on my BG level to prevent what are called 'hypos' -- which means going too low in your BG level.. Though without being on insulin or other pancreas stimulating oral meds 'going "hypo"' is a virtually non-existent worry. So you only pricking your lower thigh or forearm would be fine...

Good luck! and get started...


NewdestinyX,
Thanks for the info - i'll go get a meter.

So, is there any possibility that with the new diet and excercise that my A1c level will go down to an acceptable level without meds? Or is it more likely that it's just a matter of time before I have to go on some sort of meds?......

#11
yannah

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I think if its type 2, you have an awsome chance. treat agressively with changes.

just IMHO. I think you are in a really good place, as much as anyone can be.

I feel optimistic for you.
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#12
flenderson

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Thanks everyone for your input!

I will keep an ongoing post to let everyone know what's up as I go through this 3-month acclimation period until my next A1c test.

Does anyone have any breakfast/lunch/dinner combination suggestions? The carb counting thing is going to take some getting used to (and portion size).

I tend to eat alot in order to maintain my weight, i'm afraid that if i don't eat what i'm used to eating, i'll drop 20 lbs just like that.

Today i ate:
Breakfast: Nonfat yogurt with banana
Lunch: Grilled Chicken Salad w/ onions & bell peppers
Dinner: Sandwich (wheat bread) with lettuce/tomato and apple

Thanks again!

#13
NewdestinyX

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NewdestinyX,
Thanks for the info - i'll go get a meter.

So, is there any possibility that with the new diet and excercise that my A1c level will go down to an acceptable level without meds? Or is it more likely that it's just a matter of time before I have to go on some sort of meds?......

Yes. An awesome chance. Many here do diet and exercise only. Read the WHAT WAS YOUR BG LEVEL 2hrPP YOUR LAST MEAL and read the types of meals from a guy called ShottleBop. He manages to stay pre-diabetic with just diet and exercise only. You have to 'really' limit carbs though. Some won't want to make that significant a life change. I know I don't want to -- even though I'm down to under 100g of carbs a day now.. And trying to stay under 60g for weight loss reasons only.

Does anyone have any breakfast/lunch/dinner combination suggestions? The carb counting thing is going to take some getting used to (and portion size).

I tend to eat alot in order to maintain my weight, i'm afraid that if i don't eat what i'm used to eating, i'll drop 20 lbs just like that.

Today i ate:
Breakfast: Nonfat yogurt with banana
Lunch: Grilled Chicken Salad w/ onions & bell peppers
Dinner: Sandwich (wheat bread) with lettuce/tomato and apple

Thanks again!

Yeah it will be tricky for a guy your size to do this -- but not impossible. Though you didn't eat MUCH there in that meal plan for your day -- you need to not worry so much about 'calories' as a diabetic. When you start dropping carbs down -- the calories will naturally come down. You can eat more. A good friend once said -- can you eat a stack of pork chops the same size as a stack of pancakes? The answer it - -probably no.. So there are less calories in pork chops -- so eat more of them and less pnacakes.

I hope you like meat.. and cheese..

What I did immediately was go to a 3 egg omelette with cheese and a breakfast meat EVERY DAY for breakfast.. (Don't worry too much about cholesterol either -- when dropping the carbs -- that fixes itself too unless you have a family history of genetic heart disease issues -- another topic). And go back to full fat cheeses and milk products. We diabetics, lo carbing, don't do 'lo fat' things because they actually have MORE sugar(carbs) in them that their full fat counterparts. That blew me away when I learned that.

So some MEAT with every meal. You need to get rid of the white bread and the fruit and bananas for a season -- they are FULL of sugar. Natural sugar raises your BG level as much and sometimes even more than table sugar. But your METER will tell you if you can eat them.

I made breakfast my BIG meal of the day.. Very filling.

Then for lunch grilled chicken Caesar salad or the guts of two fast food burgers.. Just don't eat the bread part.. At a restaurant order the Chicken Parm sandwich without the roll. They'll allow special order stuff ALL the time in my experience.. Lo carb tortillas and ice creams..

You'll learn... Get started... Try to aim for 120-150g of carbs if you've been way over that. And then you won't go into cravings mode. But aim to get under 100g a day by the end of 4 weeks.
Grant

Dx 7/15/09 - A1c 10.6 :o; 10/26/09-7.2 :); 1/20/10-5.7 :D; 4/10/10-5.6 [Bayer Home Test] :D
Meds: Metformin XR 500mg-2/day, Lantus 16iu morning, Diovan 80mg-1/day,
Nexium 40mg-2/day, D3 2000iu, B12 2500mcg; Diet: for now, low carb:<70g/day
Weight mngm't: Down 30 lbs since Dx :thumbsup: Exercise reg: Biking in combo w/ 45 min at gym 3-4x/week

#14
flenderson

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Though you didn't eat MUCH there in that meal plan for your day


ha ha - yeah, this was my first day on the 'new diet'.

Before my physical,a typical meal would be
breakfast: yogurt
lunch: bbq plate with green beans/mac&cheese/corn on the cob, 2-3 glasses of sweet tea
dinner: grilled chicken pasta, water

I didn't eat too bad before, but i did overload on pasta/potatoes/chips/rice, etc. - all the bad carbs.......

#15
savvysearch

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Welcome Flenderson!

Sorry it's to the club no one wants to be a members of -- but welcome none the less.

Most all medical journals and Diabetes associations call an A1c of 6.0 -- full blown diabetes. No normal person would ever be that high and that's how you should focus your mind. 5.7 is the Prediabetes line and 6.0 is full blown.
Welcome!



I have to add a small correction to this post. Hitting 6.0 was formerly considered pre-diabetes. The ADA lowered it to 5.7 to catch more people, but the scale doesn't shift on the upper level. Anything under 6.5 (diagnosis for diabetes) is still considered pre-diabetes.

Obviously every individual is different and some individuals may have diabetes at lower a1c. Either way, I agree with the rest of the post that you should exercise and diet as if you already have diabetes. And this has to be a lifestyle change. Not something you do to lower you're glucose profile and then go back to bad habits.

Have you had an a1c before? It depends on how long you're a1c is at 6.0, but if this is fairly recent, I think you are catching it very early which is good.

As your doctor about metformin. This tends to help people with fasting glucose problems. It'll help lower the 98.


My advice:

#16
savvysearch

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I have to add a small correction to this post. Hitting 6.0-6.4 was formerly considered pre-diabetes. The ADA lowered it to 5.7 to catch more people, but the scale doesn't shift on the upper level. Anything under 6.5 (diagnosis for diabetes) is still considered pre-diabetes.

Obviously every individual is different and some individuals may have diabetes at lower a1c. Either way, I agree with the rest of the post that you should exercise and diet as if you already have diabetes. And this has to be a lifestyle change. Not something you do to lower you're glucose profile and then go back to bad habits.

Have you had an a1c before? It depends on how long you're a1c is at 6.0, but if this is fairly recent, I think you are catching it very early which is good and that's in your favor.



My advice:

Vitamin d. Get some sun or take Vit. D tablets.
Put cinnamon on anything you can. In coffee, oatmeal, cereal, etc. The jury is out on this, but it can't hurt.
Eat lots of fiber.
People tend to have more insulin resistance in the morning, so you're carb heaviest meal shouldn't be breakfast.
Exercise every day. Cardio is best. But weight training also builds muscle. And muscles require glucose. Thus, more muscles =lower blood glucose.

#17
LuckyGuy

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NewdestinyX,
Thanks for the info - i'll go get a meter.

So, is there any possibility that with the new diet and excercise that my A1c level will go down to an acceptable level without meds? Or is it more likely that it's just a matter of time before I have to go on some sort of meds?......


Hi flenderson, I am in the same boat as yours. Probably worse off. Tested 2 weeks back. My a1c came out to 6.2 and my fastiing BG came to 117 !!! My fasting BG has never been below 100 ever since I remember. But my a1c spiked above 6 for the first time. My doc recommended metformin 500 twice a day; but I have given myself 3 months to go without it. I am hoping my dietary changes and strict exercise will bring down the numbers. Maybe I am taking some risk here. Let's see.

LuckyGuy
Ht: 5'8"
Wt: 156 lb
Age: 40
No meds so far

#18
Scratch

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Ask to get c-peptide and GAD antibodies drawn for.

Based upon your height and weight and age and your statement of being in good shape, it seems unlikely though not impossible that your A1c is that high because of insulin resistance. With the history of type 1 on the one side of the family and so many of them, you're very likely to have genetic disposition towards an autoimmune form of diabetes. I'd suspect that your elevated glucose levels occur because you've lost beta cell mass and aren't producing enough insulin to bring your postmeal blood sugars down.
MDI, Lantus and Novolog
A1c 2/12 -- 5.9%

#19
flenderson

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First Blood Test:

Dinner: Grilled Chicken Salad with cheese/bell peppers/onions
Before BG 82
1 hour post: BG 103
2 hour post: BG 92

Breakfast this morning: non-fat yogurt (15 g carb) and a banana & water
Before: BG 92
1 hour post: BG 102
2 hour post: BG 103

#20
NewdestinyX

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First Blood Test:

Dinner: Grilled Chicken Salad with cheese/bell peppers/onions
Before BG 82
1 hour post: BG 103
2 hour post: BG 92

Breakfast this morning: non-fat yogurt (15 g carb) and a banana & water
Before: BG 92
1 hour post: BG 102
2 hour post: BG 103

Yeah -- pretty great. Some people would kill for those numbers.. It's a pre-diabetes sorta pattern. See how the banana kept you you elevated a little though?.. Or could just be more morning sensitivity.

Keep in mind though -- that both those meals are 'low carbish'.. To really do a mini --glucose tolerance test -- that won't kill you.. ;) -- live a little more adventuresomely -- try a burger and fries at a local fast food place and take off the bottom bun -- since the top usual has all the good stuff stuck to it.. And then do the same test... If you return to near or under 100 at teh 2hour point and don't go over 125 at one hour -- then those are still 'normal' non-diabetic numbers.. But with the family history you should 'eat' like you're already a diabetic as others have said.. sorta head it off at the pass.. as it were....

Great that you got your meter.. Which one did you pick up? One of the Walmart ones?
Grant

Dx 7/15/09 - A1c 10.6 :o; 10/26/09-7.2 :); 1/20/10-5.7 :D; 4/10/10-5.6 [Bayer Home Test] :D
Meds: Metformin XR 500mg-2/day, Lantus 16iu morning, Diovan 80mg-1/day,
Nexium 40mg-2/day, D3 2000iu, B12 2500mcg; Diet: for now, low carb:<70g/day
Weight mngm't: Down 30 lbs since Dx :thumbsup: Exercise reg: Biking in combo w/ 45 min at gym 3-4x/week




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