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#1
pwhite

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My son plays varsity high school football, basketball and LAX with 2-4 hours practice daily. I feel desperate to switch to the pump as his A1C has been over 9 for several years. Dr. says he cannot use pump and play contact sports becasue he cannot be disconnected for more than 1 hour. However, I'm hearing about athletes who use the pump during contact sports with special padding. Does anyone have experience/advice about this?

#2
RLK

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I can't speak to the padding issue, but I played soccer a few years ago, and would disconnect for games. It required me to give a small bolus at the beginning of the game to cover the upcoming basal that would be missed. I would also check my BG at halftime and correct as needed, and then again after the game. It wasn't perfect, but I think I could have fine-tuned it further if I'd been more willing to try (and played longer).

A friend of mine referees HS sports, and has mentioned to me that he sees several players each year wearing padded insulin pumps. He also sees several players wearing ankle monitors from the probation and parole department :eek:

I hope that you can get more detailed information. I don't think you need to give up on the idea of an insulin pump for your son.
Becky
T1 since 1998
Pumping since 1999

#3
pwhite

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I can't speak to the padding issue, but I played soccer a few years ago, and would disconnect for games. It required me to give a small bolus at the beginning of the game to cover the upcoming basal that would be missed. I would also check my BG at halftime and correct as needed, and then again after the game. It wasn't perfect, but I think I could have fine-tuned it further if I'd been more willing to try (and played longer).

A friend of mine referees HS sports, and has mentioned to me that he sees several players each year wearing padded insulin pumps. He also sees several players wearing ankle monitors from the probation and parole department :eek:

I hope that you can get more detailed information. I don't think you need to give up on the idea of an insulin pump for your son.


This is my 1st connection on this site. It's very comforting and encouraging to hear about your personal experience. Thanks!

#4
xMenace

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Manufacturers cover pumps damaged while playing sports.

YouTube - Toby Petersen

I wear mine playing hockey, but it's not padded. It's not contact hockey, but contact happens.
Michelle Oberg "yep....stop trying to make vegetables taste like meat.....you made your choice, now live with it hippies"

Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172

#5
Joeprep4820

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That's a pretty stupid remark coming from a doctor. While I was not a pumper during most of my contact sports days, I started to play football as well as sparring, and raquetball, again, and I'm a pumper. There are countless Type Is on this site that do things full contact such as Mixed Martial Arts, and have no problem. Even when I go to the gym, I take my pump off for the hour or two I'm working out, and when I put it back on, test, it is still relatively low due to my exercise routine. Same when I play sports. It's completely doable, despite what this doctor says.
Georgetown University Class of 2008
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Go Hoyas!

#6
pwhite

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That's a pretty stupid remark coming from a doctor. While I was not a pumper during most of my contact sports days, I started to play football as well as sparring, and raquetball, again, and I'm a pumper. There are countless Type Is on this site that do things full contact such as Mixed Martial Arts, and have no problem. Even when I go to the gym, I take my pump off for the hour or two I'm working out, and when I put it back on, test, it is still relatively low due to my exercise routine. Same when I play sports. It's completely doable, despite what this doctor says.


Encouraging. Jordon usually experiences lows about hours after practice/game--middle of the night. How would the pump handle this?

#7
RLK

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Encouraging. Jordon usually experiences lows about hours after practice/game--middle of the night. How would the pump handle this?


If it were me, I would probably set a temporary basal rate for several hours after the practice.

Basal insulin is the "background insulin" that your body needs. If Jordon is currently on injections, this is his long-acting injection(s). An insulin pump provides this basal insulin by "dripping" small amounts of short-acting insulin per hour (the rate is described in units/hour), and can be more readily adjusted than a Lantus or Levemir shot.

It will take some trial and error to figure out how much less insulin he needs and for how long. Worth with your diabetes educator/pump trainer to figure out a starting guess (for example, 75% for 3 hours) and take notes about how well (or not!) that worked.
Becky
T1 since 1998
Pumping since 1999




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