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100% Diabetic-friendly restaurant -- please read!!

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#1
diabetic1234

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Hello! I'm a student at the University of Baltimore. I am currently working on a project for a course where we must develop a business plan for a new company. As some of the group members have experience with diabetes, we decided our new company would be a 100% diabetic-friendly restaurant. This restaurant would accommodate a diabetic diet and make eating out a more simple process. We must obtain data from potential customers for the project, so we have created this survey to generate data. If you are living with diabetes, we would greatly appreciate you taking the time to fill out this 10 question survey about the restaurant. Please follow the link below. Thank you and we appreciate your help!

#2
princesslinda

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I removed your link, as you need to seek permission from Tony, forum administrator, prior to posting any surveys. After receiving permission, you'll find us to be quite willing to participate.

I would say, however, that as a diabetic, I personally wouldn't want to go to a "diabetic restaurant." I find that most "regular" restaurants have tons of choices that are good for me....I often eat steak, salads, grilled fish or chicken, fresh steamed veggies, and sweet potatoes. Many so-called "diabetic friendly" foods are often are quite the opposite.

T2, diagnosed 8/31/06.
Meds: Metformin-ER 500 mg twice daily, HCTZ 12.5 mg every other day for BP Enalapril 20 mg 1 daily (ace-inhibitor)
Diet: I eat to my meter, generally eating 75-100 carbs/day with the occasional splurge.


#3
fgummett

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Here is my usual spiel on diet (in this case it simply means "what I eat", as opposed to a drastic short-term weight-loss change)... it may help you with some general guidelines.

Real whole food, is the order of the day... preferably local and in-season, grown/reared on nutrient rich land... grass-fed beef and pastured chickens for example. This means eat whole (unprocessed, unpackaged, unadulterated) food, which includes a natural balance of fat, protein and carbohydrates (as well as vitamins, minerals etc...) ...there really is no need to be afraid of fat... it's gotten a bad rap.

Those of us with Diabetes need to pay particular attention to the foods which have the most effect on our Blood Glucose (BG) levels. There are obvious things to watch out for like candy, cola, cakes and sweets (these are high in refined/concentrated carbohydrates)... next in line are the "white" foods like bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, breakfast cereal... but even something assumed to be healthy like orange juice has about as much sugar as a cola... fat reduced milk can have an higher proportion of lactose (sugar), especially in low-fat products such as yogurts which may have High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) added to replace the fat... and so it goes on. That does not mean you need to feel deprived or hungry to eat this way, not by any means. You may even find you can work in an occasional family cake... for example.

Some ideas for snacks... I'm big on nuts, cheese, dark chocolate (70% cocoa or higher), pork rinds/scratchings, cold meats, boiled eggs, peanut butter.

While we are encouraged to eat "so many servings of fruit and veg daily", many of these can spike our BGs so we need test, test, test our BGs to find out what works for us and what doesn't... for many of us, green leafy vegetables seem to work best... but you may also help reduce/slow the BG spike by mixing foods... for example: instead of eating an apple by itself, try just half the apple in slices with some peanut butter or cheese... or have a few berries with some cream.

Personally I stay away from anything advertised as specially aimed at those with Diabetes... at worst it is simply marketing, at best it is too often well meaning but misguided... based on zero knowledge of what it takes to control BG levels. :)

#4
foxl

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I just want carb counts on the menu and a guarantee that carbs won't be snuck into foods (like HFCS injected into meats, or pancake batter in an omelet!).

I doubt restaurants will ever do that.
Linda


[B]Jan A1c 6.3/B]
Jul 09 ... C-pep 1.3, GAD-65 > 30
Mar 10 C-pep 2.8 (20 g carb); GAD 3.2
dx 02/09 in DKA


Levemir 12U per day; novolog PRN TDD ca 16U
MetforminXR 1000 mg BID
Ramipril 5 mg
T4 112 mcg
Chia oil
Vitamin D3, 4000 IU
Eating 20 - 45 g carb per day ovo-lacto-vegetarian
Walking 30 min 6x week

#5
Stuboy

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i would probably avoid the restaurant too. Much like I avoid Thorntons Diabetic Chocolate.

Im not ashamed or embarresed about my diabetes... but i dont' wish to advertise it to the general public either, and eating at a "diabetic restaurant" would be doing just that.... I can see "normal people" staring in at me thinking.... "awwww look at all the diabetics, poor them" as they walk past, feeling like im on display and out for pity.

However.... it would be a great place to meet other diabetics, as generally we seem to be few and far between.

Carb counts would be ideal on the menu, but as suggested already.... you'd have to guarantee they were correct, so the portion sizes would have to be exact all the time, as some people are very tightly controlled and very sensitive and if working off of poor information provided to them with good intentions... could possibly be the cause of a major high or hypo.
Stu
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#6
jps

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A little off topic, but I recently went to a restaurant called Texas De Brazil, it's a churrascaria. I was floored by how "diabetic friendly" this place was.

For those that have never been to one of these.... it's basically a meat restaurant. Waiters come around to tables with skewers of different types of meats. You let them know which kind you want. The chop of a slab and move on. You're able to get your fill on any of the meats they have - filet mignon, lamb, duck, chicken, sirloin, pork loin, etc, etc, etc. So many different meats and spicing options, it made my head spin. And man, they were delicious.

Also, they have an accompanying salad/vegetable bar in a buffet style. I'd say they had about 30 different side dishes available and at least 20 of them were "diabetic friendly"... some of those side dishes included roasted red peppers, smoked salmon, grilled artichoke bottoms, roasted jalepenos, spicy cauliflower, imported cheeses, grilled asparagus, grilled portobellos, shrimp, sushi, imported ham and salami, sauteed mushrooms...
"That which doesn't kill us makes us stronger" - Friedrich Nietzsche

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#7
davef

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Hello! I'm a student at the University of Baltimore. I am currently working on a project for a course where we must develop a business plan for a new company. As some of the group members have experience with diabetes, we decided our new company would be a 100% diabetic-friendly restaurant. This restaurant would accommodate a diabetic diet and make eating out a more simple process. We must obtain data from potential customers for the project, so we have created this survey to generate data. If you are living with diabetes, we would greatly appreciate you taking the time to fill out this 10 question survey about the restaurant. Please follow the link below. Thank you and we appreciate your help!


First off, as you will have noticed before posting a link to a survey you should contact the site admin. When you have permission to post a survey or link to a survey you will find people are more ready to respond.

In relation to a "100% diabetic-friendly restaurant", imho there is no requirement for such a thing. What could possibly be a better approach would be a company that provides a service to existing restaurant to help them make their menus "diabetic friendly" and by this I don't mean telling them to change their entire menu. Instead it would a service that:

A) Helps the restaurant provide information on their menu about the carb, fiber and such nutritional information. We need this information so that we can decide which foods suit us best.

B) The service could also examine a menu and find methods to reduce the carb content of existing items on the menu. For example a restaurant here in Ireland has now introduced "Burger in a bowl", they simply serve their standard range of burgers without the high carb buns.

C) As part of A & B above you will need to pay particular attention to things like sauces and dips, in this area there could be a need to find alternatives to dips/sauces which are in use that are high in sugar or sugar sources

D) Look at the procedures within the restaurant so that safeguards can be put in place so that people get what they order. All you need do is look at the multitude of posts here where people ordered as simply sugar free drink (such as Diet Coke) and received full sugar (regular coke) instead.

E) Provide an education service for the restaurant's cooks, waiting staff etc.

F) Offer something like a "Blue Circle" logo (this would have to be authorised by international Diabetes federation) so that restaurants which use the service and pass regular audits get to display the logo as being an establishment which is diabetes aware.

People with diabetes face enough problems with lack of understanding and at times intolerance, for me, there is no way on this earth I would go to a "Diabetic Restaurant".

If you are creating a business plan, then you need to factor in costs for R&D to learn more about diabetes (all types), medications and management. It is only with this knowledge that you will be able to formulate a product/service that would benefit diabetics. It may come as a shock, that many diabetics don't have a specific diet, we eat mostly the same foods as you do, but we sometimes modify the way in which it is served.
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Insulin resistance is futile - I will win - me

Metformin 3000mg daily, Enap 5mg, Victoza 1.8mg, Lantus (currently 14u)
Diagnosed T2 on 26th Nov'07, with FBG of 21mmol/L (378mg/dL) and A1c of 11.6%.
Most recent A1c 20/11/13: 11.6% <= back where I started

#8
foxl

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Then there is that other issue ... how DO you define a diabetic diet?

Because there are as many diets as there are diabetics, really!
Linda


[B]Jan A1c 6.3/B]
Jul 09 ... C-pep 1.3, GAD-65 > 30
Mar 10 C-pep 2.8 (20 g carb); GAD 3.2
dx 02/09 in DKA


Levemir 12U per day; novolog PRN TDD ca 16U
MetforminXR 1000 mg BID
Ramipril 5 mg
T4 112 mcg
Chia oil
Vitamin D3, 4000 IU
Eating 20 - 45 g carb per day ovo-lacto-vegetarian
Walking 30 min 6x week

#9
rak1978

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Then there is that other issue ... how DO you define a diabetic diet?

Because there are as many diets as there are diabetics, really!


This was my first thought too, Linda :)
This may make me a bad diabetic, I don't know, but usually if something is labeled as diabetic friendly or something of the sort (including "diabetic" cookbooks), I run the other way.
To the OP, I know this probably was not the response you were looking for! A lot of us here don't follow the ADA diet because our blood sugars can't handle it. I agree that it would be helpful to have carb content, and all nutritional information, including ingredients, on the menu. People should know what they are eating and be well equipped to make the choice on what they order. Most of us who have lived with this for a while know what we can and can not tolerate and would be able to make that decision for ourselves given the nutritional information and ingredient list.
I'm on the same boat with Frank (fgummet) on his diet spiel. I look for whole foods (mostly organic, free range, grass fed, etc...). I attempt to eat a lowish carb diet at under 80 or so a day. Carbs that I do eat consist of vegetables, some fruit, whole milk, greek yogurt, nuts, and DARK CHOCOLATE!
Would love to answer your survey if you can get it approved. I think a lot of us would be willing to help, but you may not get the answers from us that you are desiring. :(
Good luck with your project! It sounds like a big challenge.
Rachel :D
Type 1, diagnosed 2004

#10
yannah

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I want a low carb resteraunt, and I think you would get rich at this point. veggies. many veggies and meat and fish. and like dave said, watch the sauces, don't suprise me with high blood sugar from sauce.
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#11
rak1978

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I want a low carb resteraunt, and I think you would get rich at this point. veggies. many veggies and meat and fish. and like dave said, watch the sauces, don't suprise me with high blood sugar from sauce.


I agree. I think if you market it as low carb, you would be more successful than if you market it as a restaurant for diabetics. My very fit, healthy mother in law who is not diabetic eats WAY less carbs than I do. You would have a bigger customer base (in my opinion).
Rachel :D
Type 1, diagnosed 2004

#12
jps

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Then there is that other issue ... how DO you define a diabetic diet?

Because there are as many diets as there are diabetics, really!


That would be the major issue. What's diabetic friendly for one is not for another.

A complete and accurate breakdown of the nutrition on the menu would make it "diabetic friendly" for all concerned, plus it wouldn't have to be labelled as a diabetic friendly restaurant.

Most restaurants do have diabetic friendly foods, you just have to know what you are getting.
"That which doesn't kill us makes us stronger" - Friedrich Nietzsche

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#13
sarahspins

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I just want carb counts on the menu and a guarantee that carbs won't be snuck into foods (like HFCS injected into meats, or pancake batter in an omelet!).

I doubt restaurants will ever do that.


I agree.. we live in a sad state where we are left to do little more than guess at what is really in the food we're consuming, even when we think we know what it is. That is really more of a troubling issue than the types of foods typically served in a restaurant... there should really be no problem for anyone to be able to select an appropriate food item *for them* from any menu, whether they be diabetic, obese, have heart disease, high blood pressure, or anything else, but you have the added complication of the nutritional info being anything but consistent... and it's a frustrating process for ANYONE, not just diabetics. Eating out is often a guessing game.. and I'm usually wrong (not always in a huge way, but it's still frustrating).

Then there is the added problem of just what is a "diabetic diet". If you ask the ADA it's high carb and low fat... which is exactly the opposite of what many T2's have discovered works very well for them. I don't really subscribe to the low-fat is good for you mantra.. I eat "real" foods. Most of us T1's can eat anything we want.. the only thing that matters essentially is portion size.. and having accurate nutritional info. For a T2 it may be entirely different. From one T2 to the next it could still be entirely different... we're not all the same.

I don't personally want to be labeled. I wouldn't want to eat "diabetic" food just because I'm diabetic. If I want to eat 150g of carbs in a single meal I can (not that I have, but still.. I could). Low carb is fine too, as long as it's not made with artificial junk or labeled as "sugar free" when it in fact contains far more carbs than the "normal" version would (check most "sugar free" pastries in any bakery.. it's a joke). I would love to see more SMARTLY prepared things than for them just to carry a label for the sake of carrying a label... which it seems most products for "diabetics" do...
Sarah, T1 since 2000
PINGing Apidra along with Dexcom 7+

#14
Bountyman

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Overheard in a diabetic-friendly restaurant...

"Good morning, Sir. Have you decided yet?"

"Um...yes. I'd like the 'Double H Diabetic Meal', the ol' Hyperglycemic Hamburger w/Large Fries, a medium-sized Coca-Cola, a slice of your homemade apple pie w/vanilla ice cream...and I'd like to start off with 27 units of Humalog, please."

"I'm sorry, we don't carry Humalog, Sir, we only carry Novolog."

"Do you have Novolog in a pen?"

"Yes, we do."

"OK, then, I'll have the Novolog, and could you bring me an alcohol wipe with that...it seems I've forgotten mine."

"Alcohol wipes come already wrapped in your napkin, Sir."

"Wow! You guys are GOOD!"

'Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.'
-Hippocrates, Father of Medicine, 400 BC


#15
networkguy

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I just want carb counts on the menu and a guarantee that carbs won't be snuck into foods (like HFCS injected into meats, or pancake batter in an omelet!).

I doubt restaurants will ever do that.


This. Almost any restaurant is diabetic friendly nowadays as there are many choices; however, the fact that no carb info is on the menu makes it not diabetic friendly. ****...most of us can accomodate added sugar, etc, but for all that is Holy TELL US HOW MANY CARBS!!! Thats what we base our insulin on :)

#16
yannah

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Overheard in a diabetic-friendly restaurant...

"Good morning, Sir. Have you decided yet?"

"Um...yes. I'd like the 'Double H Diabetic Meal', the ol' Hyperglycemic Hamburger w/Large Fries, a medium-sized Coca-Cola, a slice of your homemade apple pie w/vanilla ice cream...and I'd like to start off with 27 units of Humalog, please."

"I'm sorry, we don't carry Humalog, Sir, we only carry Novolog."

"Do you have Novolog in a pen?"

"Yes, we do."

"OK, then, I'll have the Novolog, and could you bring me an alcohol wipe with that...it seems I've forgotten mine."

"Alcohol wipes come already wrapped in your napkin, Sir."

"Wow! You guys are GOOD!"


hahahahahahaha! and can I write my BS result on the comment card?

yeah I would market it as a low carb resteraunt. i beleive there is a really good market for that.
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#17
yannah

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but yeah know what I want to do...."the Diabetic Cafe"

ya know, with famous diabetics on the wall. and some diabetic music. say .......something form the 90's. like "bloodletting" by Concrete Blonde. a treadmill. some splenda. a veggie tray with crab dip. and coffee with nothing but cream. would you like that hot or cold???? no, those are your options, hot or cold....

I will call this "Welcome to DF" and yes, there will be coconut oil on anything for an extra 80 cents.


a "1 hour couch" and a "2 hours couch"

and a nurse with a blood pressure cuff. i think I will put her in something moderately sexy though.
last a1c 5.5. /5.8

low carb

quinipril- 5 mg day
novolog 70/30


my lipid profile is finally amazing.

I LOVE YOU!

#18
Joeprep4820

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Seeing as how I really follow a healthy diet rather than a "Diabetic" diet, I would see no need for that type of restaurant. The only things I could see making it more Diabetic friendly would be more diet drink options besides diet cola. If you want a low carb type of place, just go to Fago de Chao, a Brazilian Steakhouse.
Georgetown University Class of 2008
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
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Complication free and keeping it that way
Go Hoyas!

#19
ShottleBop

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Claim Jumpers has booklets at each table that tell you how many carbs are in their menu items.
Functionally, a Type 2 (missed the label by th-a-a-a-a-t much)
Dx prediabetic 02/08 (FBG 127 and 123), A1c 6.5
So far, controlled without meds.

#20
djt1344

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I agree Linda, and most of you guys, I have learned that it's the sauce that put's all foods into non diabetic friendly territory. I have also learned that meats and fish are good for you as well as veggies that are not doused with the special brown sauce.

Daniel




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