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Humulin vs Novolin?

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#1
genie86333

genie86333

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Hi, everyone.

In my box of syringes, I found an ad for Reli-On's Novolin N for under $25/vial. The doc had me get Humulin N, which is twice as expensive (he thought it was $30/vial, but it's actually about $50. $48.80 is the cheapest I found & I'd have to go to Walmart anyway for my other meds & syringes because they're WAY more expensive at the pharmacy where Humulin's cheapest.)

I've been reading a bit on the net to see what the differences are & most sites I've seen say they're about the same (some say they are the same, just different brand names...)

Any input here?

#2
Hismouse

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I see you live in Cali too, I live down in San Diego. I have Kaiser ins, I am on Novolin N, for 3 months 3 bottles/vials and 100 syringes was $25.00.....I get my One touch test trips for free.
Do you not have a precription plan?
Type 1.5 since age 16, 38yrs of this Diabetes,
Novolin N 11 units Am and 11 at dinner
Diovan 20mg
HCTZ 12.5
D3 50,000 every week
Chelated magn

Psoriasis
Valley Fever
post Pheochromocytoma
So 1 Adrenal Gland in me
:)
A1C was 7 Oct/09
A1C is 6.8 Mar/10
A1c was 7.1 July/10

#3
enigmalady777

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I'm on Kaiser too, but my plan is different.

Kaiser offers many different plans and depending upon which one your employer has chosen (if your insurance is through your employer, which mine is) or which one you have purchased on your own, the prescription benefit can vary widely.

I typically pay about $30 for a three month supply of BG strips, $25 for 400 syringes, $50 for three month supply of Novolog (3 vials) and $75 for a three month supply of Levemir (5 vials).

The current plan I have is not as good as the one I had some years ago with a different employer, but still a "bargain" in light of the fact that without the prescription benefit my costs would be through the roof.

Novolin N and Humilin N are indeed the same product, different manufacturer. Depending upon what state you live in, they also may be available without a prescription.
Lantus, Novolog
Metformin 850 x 3
Lower carb lifestyle

A1C:
11/3/07: 7.5
2/23/08: 7.4
8/30/08: 8.1 :eek:
1/29/09: 5.7
5/21/09: 5.7
9/28/09: 5.8
12/27/09: 5.3
03/15/10: 6.0
08/06/10: 6.1
12/02/10: 6.3

Triglycerides:
11/3/07: 321
2/23/08: 328
8/30/08: 330
1/29/09: 166
5/29/09: 230
9/28/09: 201
03/15/10: 203
08/06/10: 200
12/02/10: 207

#4
genie86333

genie86333

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I *could* get Kaiser, at a price of about $170 a month - with a $2770 deductible. That's the only plan available to me through either of my jobs. I had a similar BCBS plan in AZ & it was a collosal waste of money for me.

So no, I don't have any medical coverage right now. Everything is out of pocket. My doc understands this (and does what she can to help - charges the minimum fee for an office visit, gives me samples because I'm the only diabetic she treats that doesn't have insurance, etc.) but for some reason had me consult w/her partner this time & even though I told him she'd had me research insulin prices (and I knew the Novolin R was $25, but didn't know about the price of the Novolin N...and that there was a program I qualified for providing Lantus) he didn't consider my suggestions. :(

#5
Subby

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Both basically the same thing. Human Insulin, NPH. I'd just go the cheapest route.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#6
genie86333

genie86333

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Both basically the same thing. Human Insulin, NPH. I'd just go the cheapest route.


Thanks for the input, Subby & enigmalady. That's pretty much what I thought from my reading, but wanted to get some input from the "experts" (at least more expert than newbie-to-insulin me) here. ;)

#7
Subby

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Understood, but also, don't take our word for it... Run it by your doc too, no (good) reason he shouldn't give a straight answer.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#8
genie86333

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Understood, but also, don't take our word for it... Run it by your doc too, no (good) reason he shouldn't give a straight answer.


Actually, I was thinking I'd run it by my normal doc, actually, not her partner. :) Just wanted to have my facts straight first.

#9
HeartMan

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Genie, After reading your post I did some checking on the web. Novo Nordisk has a patient assistance program for people who do not have insurance and do not qualify for public support. If this sounds like you, check out their site. I just Googled "Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance" and a link to the actual form. Their entire site is very helpful as well.
Post Transplant Diabetes 2004
FreeStyle Lite, Accu-Chek Aviva, Contour USB meters
NovoLog & Levimir Insulins
A1C 04/10 5.8
A1C 08/10 5.6

#10
genie86333

genie86333

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Genie, After reading your post I did some checking on the web. Novo Nordisk has a patient assistance program for people who do not have insurance and do not qualify for public support. If this sounds like you, check out their site. I just Googled "Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance" and a link to the actual form. Their entire site is very helpful as well.


Hi, HeartMan.

Thanks for the info, but I just miss the income cutoff for their assistance program. (The good news is if my part-time job does lay me off as I'm worried about, I'll qualify...LOL.) But that's all right because the novolin N is actually quite inexpensive...the humulin N, which is what the doctor prescribed, is twice as much - still affordable, but why spend twice as much for the same (or very similar) product?

#11
poodlebone

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When I was on NPH + Regular I used Lilly's Humulin insulins since that's what I was given when diagnosed. Not sure if Novolin was even available then. Years later when I'd go to buy some at the pharmacy they were out of Hululin and asked if I wanted Novolin. I found very little difference between the two. The Novolin R (same as Relion R) did seem to pack more of a punch and I would often take a little less of it. I didn't really notice much difference between the two brands of NPH.

So, if you've been used to Humulin just be careful in the beginning when switching to Novolin/Relion. You may notice a difference, you may not. If you do, you'll just have to do some trial & error to figure out any changes that need to be made in dosing (amounts or timing).
--
Liz
Type 1 dx 4/1987
Minimed Paradigm 723 Revel + CGMS
13mm Silhouettes + Sure-T infusion sets
Lifescan Ultra meters
Last A1c: 7/10: 5.4




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