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I skip meals and my sugar is higher??

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#1
huligoo

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Why the heck does that happen? Can someone help me understand this? Im supposed to eat less cuz I need to lose weight and look my sugar goes up if I skip a meal....Does that mean its a liver dump?
Be kind to others~:)

#2
ShottleBop

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Could be. If I don't eat breakfast in the morning--after not eating since dinner the night before--my BG will keep rising all morning.
Functionally, a Type 2 (missed the label by th-a-a-a-a-t much)
Dx prediabetic 02/08 (FBG 127 and 123), A1c 6.5
So far, controlled without meds.

#3
Patriots62

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Huligoo,

Skipping a meal will do that and it is biological and intended. The body stores sugar in the liver which then releases it for energy throughout the day as needed based on your biological clock; ie., when you are typically physically active, resting, when you normally eat and so forth. It learns and just does it.

However, when you do not eat a meal, the liver kicks in and starts dumping sugar for energy into the blood stream as a response because it the rest of the body is demanding that energy.

That is the real simplified answer obviously and there is far far more to it. But many of us as diabetics have learned that eating regularly, and more often with smaller snacks, reduces that impact and regulates the sugar release.

So, the short answer is that is perfectly normal.:) :)
Doug

Diagnosed 22/12/09:eek:
A1c then 12.2:eek:
T2::(
A1c as of 5/5/12 6.1 :D
A1c as of 11/5/13 6.0 :D
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#4
ShottleBop

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Check out the column for May 11 in "Diabetes Update"--Jenny Ruhl discusses fasting BGs generally. There are even some folks whose basal insulin secretion fails; they must eat to stimulate the secretion of insulin:

Damaged Basal Insulin Secretion. The body secretes insulin in two different physiological processes which are described on this page: How Blood Sugar Control Works--And How It Stops Working. I urge you to read this page because mastering the concepts it explains will greatly help you understand and manage your diabetes.

Basal insulin secretion takes place throughout the day without reference to what you eat. Tiny amounts of insulin are squirted into the blood stream in small pulses every few minutes. However, sometimes things go wrong with the factors that control basal secretion. If that happens, your body may still be able to secrete insulin in response to meal time rises in glucose, but you lose the ability to secrete those tiny pulsing bursts. This can cause a rise in fasting glucose that can not be corrected with dietary changes. If you have this problem, you might need a basal insulin--a slow acting insulin that mimics the effect of natural basal secretion.

Basal failure is relatively rare, but when it happens you often find people with high fasting blood sugars whose blood sugar normalizes as soon as they eat and stays normal until they have metabolized their last meal. There are also genetic forms of diabetes (GCK mutations) that will cause elevated fasting glucose, however, this will be a lifelong problem, not one that comes on with age.


Functionally, a Type 2 (missed the label by th-a-a-a-a-t much)
Dx prediabetic 02/08 (FBG 127 and 123), A1c 6.5
So far, controlled without meds.

#5
xMenace

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So when your ingested insulin response is needed to cover your basal needs -- identified by rising BGs when fasting -- then I take that as a sign that your beta cells are overworked and/or damaged, hence the diagnosis of diabetes.

I know an old guy that treats highs with toast. It brings him right down. Of course it's a strategy doomed to failure in teh long run.
Michelle Oberg "yep....stop trying to make vegetables taste like meat.....you made your choice, now live with it hippies"

Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172

#6
dbaratta

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Why the heck does that happen? Can someone help me understand this? Im supposed to eat less cuz I need to lose weight and look my sugar goes up if I skip a meal....Does that mean its a liver dump?


Its a curse. LOL Yeah that is liver dump. That is one of my biggest problems. I can wake up with a reading in the 60's and be 220 by 10:30 am if i don't eat a little something and bolus for it. :eek:
A1C JULY 2010 5.9%
A1C March 2010 6.2%
Lantus 16 units split dose
Novolog as needed


:aetsch:

#7
REDLAN

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Interesting finding by ShottleBop about basal insulin failure, which would explain the problems, although I have had a quick look and can't find any supporting evidence for Jenny's assertion, and annoyingly she doesn't reference a source.

Another factor to potentially consider is the effect of food on insulin resistance. Ingestion of a meal causes a drop in insulin resistance. No food, slowly rising insulin resistance, which may contribute to the OP's problems.

Not so sure about release of glucose by the liver, but this would be the potential mechanism by which fasting blood glucose would rise with someone with basal insulin failure. Lack of insulin would speed up the breakdown of glycogen into glucose. If this was the case I think you might also start experiencing ketosis.

The answer would appear to be not to miss meals.

#8
jaye

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Why the heck does that happen? Can someone help me understand this? Im supposed to eat less cuz I need to lose weight and look my sugar goes up if I skip a meal....Does that mean its a liver dump?


Your blood sugar goes up because your liver will produce glucose when it doesn't have food. Never ever skip a meal. Watching your carb intake and walking will help keep your blood sugar levels on an even keel. I eat around 20 carbs a meal, rarely any more than that. I'm on no meds but when I was first diagnosed, I was taking Actos, glipizide and metformin. That was 3 years ago, now I control with diet and exercise.

#9
Tribbles

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It's a well documented effect, usually called something like the second meal effect. Here is a paper on the topic, The second meal phenomenon in type 2 diabetes. The executive summary is don't skip breakfast, and if you do you will go higher than normal at your next meal and stay higher for longer.

#10
Dis-N-Dat

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Your blood sugar goes up because your liver will produce glucose when it doesn't have food. Never ever skip a meal. Watching your carb intake and walking will help keep your blood sugar levels on an even keel. I eat around 20 carbs a meal, rarely any more than that. I'm on no meds but when I was first diagnosed, I was taking Actos, glipizide and metformin. That was 3 years ago, now I control with diet and exercise.


I second this. By skipping meals you're also teaching your body that it is "starving" and it begins to store fat. Add to that the slowing of your metabolisim and you've taught your body to gain weight. I know it seems counterintuitive but that's physiology for you. :)
1. Eat small, low carb bites of food at 3 hour intervals.
2. Cheese sticks (low fat Mozerella) are your friends.
10 months since my dx...90lbs lighter, bg ave 80's, A1C <6. It works. :tee:

"There are two ways to live your life. One is as if nothing is a miracle, the other as if everything is".
...Albert Einstein...

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