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1 gram of carb raises my blood sugar?

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#1
jackstark211

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How would be the best and most accurate way to test this?
HbA1c
•November 2010- 5.6
•February 2011- 5.4
•June 2011- 5.1
•October 2011- 5.8
•May 2012- 5.9

#2
janice21475

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Hello Jack,

According to Dr. Richard Bernstein, for a 150-pound diabetic, a gram of carbs will raise his/her blood sugar by 5 points.


One of the first purchases we made after my husband was diagnosed was Dr. Berstein's book. Excellent resource and educational tool.

Of course, carbs from cabbage are not equal with carbs from grain or honey. Oatmeal in any form/amount will s pike my husband, while many folks here eat it daily. The best way to know is to buy a nice notebook and sit down and test - test- test. On an empty stomach test your BG, eat something (making note of the time, BG reading, food item and quantity). Then at 1 hour past, test again & write the results down. Do it again at 2 hours past. Do this for each thing you will be hoping to be eating. This will give you the information you need to form your diet to fight this disease/condition.

I am sure you will get more opinions but I just wanted to share mine. :)

One of the best things you can do is enter questions you have in the search on this forum and then read through the threads. There is a gold mine of information in the form of personal experience here and it is yours for the mining.

Kind regards,
Janice & husband

#3
PBER57

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I agree with Janice. I find it a very individual thing too and all of us are different. Some complex carbs are worse than others for us and some spike like wild and some dont. Get Dr B's book. You will get a better understanding and some of this testing you can do yourself. Good luck. :cool:

#4
Tribbles

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How would be the best and most accurate way to test this?


Wait until you haven't taken bolus insulin or food for about four hours and then take a couple of glucose tablets, measure your levels at 15 and 30 minutes. Foods with a lower glycemic index will take longer to peak which is why you should use glucose tablets (plus they are precisely measured).

#5
jwags

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With me it varies. 25 carbs from processed bread raise my bgs 100 points. 25 carbs from Eziekel bread will raise it about 30. Sometimes the time of day matters too. I am usually more sensitive to carbs in the morning. If I add coconut oil to a meal it will slow down the carb spike. I try to eat no more than 15 carbs a meal most days unless it is Eziekel Bread which will keep me close to 120 at 2 hours.

#6
jackstark211

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Thank you all. :)

Since 1 glucose tab is about 4 carbs, how long will it take before 1 will generally peak and how should I do the math to figure it down to a single carb?
HbA1c
•November 2010- 5.6
•February 2011- 5.4
•June 2011- 5.1
•October 2011- 5.8
•May 2012- 5.9

#7
shyam

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This is certainly YMMV. Very difficult to pinpoint with so many variables.
DX Type II Nov 2007 (219 fasting)
Diet/Exercise since Aug 2010
1stAug10 : BG 178 Fasting / A1C : 8.00, Oct'10 6.9 / Jan'11 6.4
Apr'11 6.0 / June'11 5.9 / Oct'11 5.8 / Jan'12 5.6 / Apr'12 5.3
Now between 70-125 all the time
;)

#8
Lloyd

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Thank you all. :)

Since 1 glucose tab is about 4 carbs, how long will it take before 1 will generally peak and how should I do the math to figure it down to a single carb?

I would test every 15 minutes until things steady out. Most glucose tabs have 4 carbs, so however much it raises your glucose, divide by 4 to get how much one gram of carbohydrate raises your glucose.

-Lloyd

2014 A1c 5.4 5.6 5.8 5.6   2013 5.3 4.9 5.2 5.2

2012 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 2011 5.0 5.0 5.2 5.0 2010 5.3 5.3 5.3 5.4 5.4

2009 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.2 2008 5.0 5.1 5.2 4.9 4.9

2007 5.3 5.5 5.7<---Pump 6.9 (Mix)

2006 (Lantus) 7.8 8.5 8.7 7.1

2005 8.4 6.9 7.4 2004 6.2 5.6 6.4 6.0 (Pills)


#9
Subby

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How would be the best and most accurate way to test this?


Jack, as an insulin dependent T1, if you have a working I:C ratio and a working Correction Factor (both highly recommended for anyone trying to make intensive insulin work) then you already have an answer to this.

Let's say you have an I:C of 1:20 and a CF of 1:40

Breaking it down, that means:
1 unit of Insulin covers 20 grams
1 unit of Insulin lowers you 40 mg/dl

That means that 20 grams raises you 40 mg/dl

Or, 1 gram raises you 4 mg/dl.

---Just substitute your own I:C ratio and CF to determine how much carbs raise you. Any problems following this trail, you can post your ratios here.

You can also test it with a tab if you like. I would not expect perfect results nor go on for long. I would wait until I am relatively stable, pop a tab and wait for a max of 30 minutes. After that, take your test and get some insulin into you if you need it. If your tabs are 4g, then you will divide your result by 4 to get the effect of 1g. Anything beyond that is going to be relatively useless for your situation, imo. Unless you have a precedent for your own body to do this, there is no expectation for a T1 to even out after taking any carbs without insulin. Without rear guard action of tardy phase 2 responses that say, a non insulin dependent T2 might experience, BGs may well go up and up over the hours. Then again if you are still honeymooning hard, you may well expect this. But in either case, Glucose tabs should have hit your system fully by 30 min, being generous.

There are also a lot of other factors that may make such a test (and I:C rations and CFs for that matter) not precise. Because it may not be possible to precisely pin down a universal effect carbs have on you - different times of the day, different types of carbs. But you can certainly try and get some reference points this way.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#10
TommyC1

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The way to find out how much a gram of carb will raise you is to test.
When you have not eaten for a while get a BS reading, then eat a known quantity of carbs, then test a few times over the next two hours.
IMO for T1's that is most useful for figuring hypo corrections. I know that 10 grams of carb will raise me 40 mgdl. So if I go low I can eat 1 granola bar (13 g) or three Canada mints (9 g) or half a Hershy bar (12 g) and be reasonably confident that I'll come back over 70 without going over 130. Beats the heck out of doing calculations while out of my head.
I got there using the method Subby lays out above. Experience has shown that it works for me.
YMMV.

Lantus & Novalog MDI

#11
Subby

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Let's say you have an I:C of 1:20 and a CF of 1:40

Breaking it down, that means:
1 unit of Insulin covers 20 grams
1 unit of Insulin lowers you 40 mg/dl

That means that 20 grams raises you 40 mg/dl

Or, 1 gram raises you 4 mg/dl.


Whoops, that last line should read "1 gram raises you 2 mg/dl."

Ie, divide the mg/dl by the grams, 40/20 = 2.

OK, so maths is not my strong point.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#12
jackstark211

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OK, so maths is not my strong point.


The applies to me as well. :)
HbA1c
•November 2010- 5.6
•February 2011- 5.4
•June 2011- 5.1
•October 2011- 5.8
•May 2012- 5.9

#13
Gigem99

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Whoops, that last line should read "1 gram raises you 2 mg/dl."

Ie, divide the mg/dl by the grams, 40/20 = 2.

OK, so maths is not my strong point.

I can't remember exactly how I figured out how much 1 gram will raise me, but that formula does not work for me. My I:C is 1:15, and my sensitivity factor is 80, so using that formula would be 80/15 = 5.3.

But, I know for a fact that 1 g will raise my BG 6-8 points - I think I just figured this out by trial and error - it's been a few years since I've done this, but it still remains the same.
Tom

dx'd 1985 at age 31
Pumping with MM 522 since 8/2007
CGMS since 12/2007
12/2006 A1c - 9.8
6/2008 A1c - 6.1

#14
Subby

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I wouldn't call a 5 vs 6-8 wildly inaccurate, it's within hailing distance of what sounds like a rather variable target.

The amount a gram raises BG is not the sort of figure that any T1 should be using or relying on to any great degree. When we want to be raising out blood sugar because of a hypo, it is probably to a max 30 mg/dl at a time, and there will be other factors at work that may dwarf a predicted mg/dl here or there. If we want to predict a spike, again we would want to be in the bounds of maybe 20 or 40 points. The variance between using 5 or 6 mg/dl as your unit is not going to make much difference in such equations.

But I agree that experience is the best teacher for the most definitive answer. While others might differ, I don't consider any equation particularly foolproof when it comes to insulin. Just potentially useful here and there.
20 years T1. NPH and Novorapid.
Some essentials for my blood sugar control: dosing via i:c ratio and cf • basal testing when needed • daily 40 minutes moderate exercise (or close) • carbs somewhere below 120g currently • only eating carbs and carb/fat combos that do not cause a problem spike, with or without insulin.

#15
TommyC1

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While others might differ, I don't consider any equation particularly foolproof when it comes to insulin. Just potentially useful here and there.


The numbers get you into the ballpark.
Experience gets you a lot closer.
But anybody who says they get it right every time is either extremely lucky or a liar.
So we test and correct.

Lantus & Novalog MDI




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