Jump to content

Photo

Blood Sugars

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
JenOlejniczak

JenOlejniczak

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
Hi folks,
I am embarking on the end of my first trimester. To be honest things have been going pretty well, blood sugar wise, I've had some highs but mostly due to site issues.
One thing I keep beating myself up on though is everytime I get a high I feel like I have failed in some way, almost like you have the weight of the world on your shoulders. I am sure I am not alone in this. This is my second pregnancy with my first one, resulting in a very early miscarraige, this probably doesn't help with my worry.
Is there any advice out there?? I am checking 10-12 times a day on the insulin pump and actively exercising, so I think I am doing all I can do :).
Just wanted to know if anyone else went through these same feelings.
Thanks!
Jen

#2
xMenace

xMenace

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 11,118 posts
Welcome,

Check out Bethany's blog.

About Me « Me With D

Virginia Woolf: “Consider how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed, what wastes and deserts of the soul a slight attack of influenza brings to view, what precipices and lawns sprinkled with bright flowers a little rise of temperature reveals, what ancient and obdurate oaks are uprooted in us by the act of sickness, how we go down in the pit of death and feel the waters of annihilation close above our heads and wake thinking to find ourselves in the presence of the angels and the harpers when we have a tooth out and come to the surface in the dentist's arm-chair and confuse his "Rinse the mouth-rinse the mouth" with the greeting of the Deity stooping from the floor of Heaven to welcome us - when we think of this, as we are so frequently forced to think of it, it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature”
Back on MDI and doing well. Trying Victoza and loving it. A1C 6.0, no major hypos; a few highs; lots of shots. Diagnosed Oct 19th, 1975.
HDL-101; LDL-64; TG-36; TOT-172


#3
aiah23

aiah23

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 1,748 posts
It's pretty common to feel this way. The thing you get to realizing, is that you'll drive yourself insane with worry agonizing over every high. It isn't worth it b/c it leaves you more irritable (as if that was even possible during pregnancy) and more worn out. Please know that there are certain weeks where you are just plain more likely to be routinely on the higher end b/c the placenta kicks out growth hormones for your baby and it essentially results in insulin resistance (so you're combatting double diabetes at that point). Don't feel bad about it, keep regular contact with your diabetes educator, your perinatologist, and your high-risk OB, and do the necessary bloodwork and follow-ups with your endo. You should be fine.

Fawn
Novolog and Levemir, MDI
Sleep deprived first time mommy working full time! :eek:
A1C: 6.7 as of 04/28/12

#4
Steal

Steal

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 697 posts

Hi folks,
I am embarking on the end of my first trimester. To be honest things have been going pretty well, blood sugar wise, I've had some highs but mostly due to site issues.
One thing I keep beating myself up on though is everytime I get a high I feel like I have failed in some way, almost like you have the weight of the world on your shoulders. I am sure I am not alone in this. This is my second pregnancy with my first one, resulting in a very early miscarraige, this probably doesn't help with my worry.
Is there any advice out there?? I am checking 10-12 times a day on the insulin pump and actively exercising, so I think I am doing all I can do :).
Just wanted to know if anyone else went through these same feelings.
Thanks!
Jen


I would agree that this is a normal feeling. I have an 8.5 month old and I am not 16.5 weeks along with baby #2. I test all the time, but especially with my first baby, I would cry when numbers went up. I have learned to not be so hard on myself and this control of emotion also seems to help me keep numbers under control. Sometimes they go up and sites don't work with the pump, but the key is that you figured it out and you aren't high for weeks at a time. I am so sorry to hear of your miscarriage, but it really does sound like you are doing all that you can. Keep it up and I am happy to be here for you if you need someone to talk to.

-Steph

#5
haleymerr

haleymerr

    Junior Member

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
I had the exact same reaction when i got my first reading over 260 after i found out i was pregnant. i freaked out and felt guilty for days, but now im 6 months along and everything is as normal as possible! Its really your a1c that really counts , as long as it stays below 7.0 you and your baby should be fine, happy and healthy :) just try to stay calm and dont stack boluses when it does go high! (i learned that the hard way! )

#6
lucky711

lucky711

    Junior Member

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
You could not have stated how I feel now at this moment any better! I just found out last night that i am pregnant, prob about 2-3 weeks. Today I have been doing everything right! Eating right with exact carb counts, testing every hour, charting for my doctor and all day my sugars have went dfrom 54, 121, 182, 199, 197, 138, 147, 214 & now 209.......These highs are freaking me out!!!!! Im trying to do everything right and i feel like im doing it all wrong! Im sooooooo nervous about the highs because the doctors warn you sooo much about them!
I wish there was a simple answer!

#7
Steal

Steal

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 697 posts
Lucky711,

All you can do is bolus and check that the spot you are using is working, if you are on the pump. You might also have lots of emotions with just getting the news and this affects my blood sugar so, so much. It really is normal and all you can do is test and test often. You just care about your little one and you will bring it down.

Feel free to write and congratulations.

-Steph
Type I 25 Years (Diagnosed at age 6)
Insulin Pump User 13 years
Daughter #1: 11.5 months old
Pregnant with #2: 30.5 weeks along
Most recent A1C: 5.6%
Full Time Teacher on Summer Break

#8
Lizzie G

Lizzie G

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 1,076 posts
Hi Lucky,

Welcome to the fun! Something I found difficult early in pregnancy was that I was repeatedly being told that my blood sugars would be dropping in the first trimester and I would always be low, etc,etc. Bare in mind that this isnt always the case for everyone, and also, a bit of an overgeneralisation as some women definitely do get more insulin resistant through the first trimester. what does seem to be common though, is to be susceptible to some insulin resistance at that early stage where you are now, and then to gradually experience dropping insulin needs throughout the first trimester. The very best thing you can do is to adjust your basals (I usually do this in increments of 5% which is pretty cautious but can also make a surprising difference) in response, and keep testing and aware that you are dealing with a very mobile target. you will also need to play with your carb ratios; i seem to remember embarking on pregnancy with a ratio of about 1 unit : 8 grams of carb, but when I was about your stage i switched to about 1 in 6.

I'm not going to overload you with what to expect throughout the entire pregnancy, but something else I think people have mentioned is that you seem to have occasional days throughout pregnancy where you have 'hormone surges'. for me, every couple of weeks i will have a day where i am just massively insulin resistant, and i have to be even more super aggressive with insulin (at 31 weeks on a NORMAL day im now taking about 140-150 units of insulin, WOW!). Its kind of hard to explain until you have been there - so whilst the general trend in insulin requirement may be rising gradually for example around week 24, you are inclined to have the odd day where its just super high ,you seem to need twice as much insulin and it seems weird. you will learn to recognise these days and not to panic - to understand that they are not part of the gradual increase and that the adjustments for those days are only temporary. All through pregnancy i have carried both fasting acting carbs (glucotabs) and cereal bars and apples with me, as it is far easier and more precise to correct upwards, and over-doing the insulin does bring the highs down faster.

Another thing that is really important in pregnancy, is to make sure you have the type of pregnancy and delivery that you would like. If you are someone that is used to adjusting your insulin for changes in diet, lifestyle, sport, etc and keeping tight control, you are probably all set to manage this yourself, and might prefer to have a more 'normal' pregnancy where you are monitored with the same frequency as a person without diabetes, or are close as is possible. Other people aren't so comfortable with this and prefer to have the support of a diabetes team, to share their blood glucose log and wait for suggested changes to insulin regimes. It's important to find what you are comfortable with and to push back about what you want if it is outside of the 'standard protocol', but sometimes you do need to make compromises because of the standard practices hospitals have (which often seem to have been written in the days where it apparently wasnt possible to achieve tight glycaemic control or have a normal sized healthly baby if the mother had diabetes....). So for example, I have very tight control and I wanted to be discharged from 'high risk' and to Community Midwife care. At 31 weeks of pregnancy I know this would have been fine, but they all got panicky and over-excited and tried to bully me into thinking that i was neglecting the needs of my baby (on this i still totally disagree but will wait until after my pregnancy to register my disgust at these comments). So now i go back to the diabetes and pregnancy clinic every 4 weeks, see the obstetrician and midwife for about 5 minutes, then see the endocrinologist for about 5 minutes and chat about the weather. Whilst in some ways these appointments still seem like a giant waste of time, you do need these people's support, not necesarily in the actual pregnancy management, but if like me you do not intend to have a 'diabetic' birth, want to go to term and not be strapped to a monitor throughout labour with needles in your arm, it very much helps to have the support of these people so that they can sign your birth plan so that you dont get to the hospital and face a giant battle which you could do without.

Sorry, that did end up a bit rambling. I sometimes feel that a lot of the advice on these forums is geared towards ultra high risk pregnancy where the mother is not in good control of her condition and doesnt have the confidence to self manage, and whilst this is important for many, some of us can have a less medicalised pregnancy, but we do need to fight for it rather than be swept with the tide of protocol and I do feel that i need to balance some of the advice by introducing the possiblity of a more normal pregnancy.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

Lizzie
Type 1
Mum to Samuel, born 09 Sept 2011 and James, born 10 Feb 2014
Latest HbA1C: 5.8%


#9
MelissaDawn

MelissaDawn

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
I've been right where you are... My first pregnancy also ended in an early miscarriage. Despite being told by my doctors that I shouldn't blame the diabetes at all for what happened, when I got pregnant again I panicked at each high. I'm now almost 28 weeks pregnant and everything is going beautifully. My baby looks healthy, is growing beautifully, and has no signs of defects or problems. I had some of those early highs (the lows started to hit around week 10 or 11, which my doctors said was very normal) that drove me nuts, but my overall A1c was good and has stayed consistently where the doctors tell me to target.

You can't be perfect. Hormones are raging and there will be days when you just can't figure out what is happening. Keep testing 10-12 times a day (more if you want... I often do) and treat as needed. If you notice a day with lots of highs, use a temp basal to help compensate. I've felt really good about my doctors and team. They are always positive about what I'm doing, despite the imperfections that seem so terrible to me.

Do all that you can do, and then trust in God to do the rest. That's all any of us can do. Good luck to you!

#10
lucky711

lucky711

    Junior Member

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Thank you everyone for writing back about your own experiences! I just took it upon myself to increase my basal 10% and then i will go from there! I have been floating at 120 all night and then at 8:30 in the morning I increase up to about 170 and I remain there! So I def want to get that down! I am also finding that when I eat yogurt or say multi grain rice I peak real quick right after to like 190 and then after a half hour I go back down! but the docs say that post meal I shouldn't be that high! Im thinking maybe I should I take my insulin maybe 20 minutes before I eat, but that so hard to time in everyday life . I so wish there was an easy answer, but I guess I am doing what ever I possibly can at this point! I meet with my team on july 21st so hopefully she will have some more answers for me! Thanks again for the advice! Keep on writing!

#11
Steal

Steal

    Senior Member

  • Seniors
  • 697 posts
Lucky711,

Good work on increasing. It sounds like you need another increase probably around 7:00am and a bit throughout the whole night to get it lower. If you can start lower before you eat, and probably have a bit higher of a carb-insulin ratio in the morning, it might help you balance. My morning requirements are much higher than later in the day and this is very typical for diabetics. Just something to keep in mind. I have 8 or 9 different basal rates and a different carb-insulin ratio depending on the time of day. It might help to take insulin a bit before you eat, but it seems like you might just need to increase some of the requirements. One thing I have learned is that I keep increasing them, as much as I need to and if I have to lower them, then I do.
Keep it up! You can do it!

-Steph
Type I 25 Years (Diagnosed at age 6)
Insulin Pump User 13 years
Daughter #1: 11.5 months old
Pregnant with #2: 31 weeks along
Most recent A1C: 5.6%
Full Time Teacher on Summer Break

#12
MelissaDawn

MelissaDawn

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
I take my insulin 20 minutes early as much as possible because I'll either go high if I don't or low later if I make it so the high doesn't come. Also, balancing your carbs with protein (my dietitian says at least a gram of protein for every 2 grams of carb) helps keep the peak down.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users