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What causes your food spikes?

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#1
confusedwife

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Apart from the obvious sugar, I am interested because we have found by testing that if hubby has bread his sugars quickly spike, but he can eat reasonable amounts of potatoes without too many problems. Cooked tomatoes are ok, but raw ones spike him.
What food problems do others have?

#2
Todd G.

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Apart from the obvious sugar, I am interested because we have found by testing that if hubby has bread his sugars quickly spike, but he can eat reasonable amounts of potatoes without too many problems. Cooked tomatoes are ok, but raw ones spike him.
What food problems do others have?


You might be confusing some things. The fat content of the meal will effect spikes quite a bit. More fat equals lower but more prolonged elevated levels. Big spikes carry certain risks, and prolonged elevated levels carry their own set of risks too. Just because a food "only" spikes you to 170 doesn't mean it's okay if you stay at 170 for several hours. Pizza does this for a lot of people.

Generally, the idea is to stay away from white food except for cauliflower, so no rice, pasta, potatoes, breads, etc. Things like apples and carrots are case by case, and grapes and juices are problematic for almost everyone. People talk about "area under the curve", meaning that the area under the response curve is the same for any given amount of ingested carbs even if the shape of the response is different. I know, it's just one more thing to think about. Sorry.

Jwags will be along shortly to tell you about sprouted bread. I hope hers tastes better than the stuff I tried. It was like licking a pigs butt. :) But don't let that discourage you from trying it.

#3
samorgan

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I find spot checking to be pretty hit and miss. If I found similar foods having vastly different effects (as many here apparently do) I would not take it seriously unless I had say an average of at least 100 readings under similar conditions and still found the variance. There are just too many other factors which can affect readings.

Gram for gram, all carbohydrates essentially produce the same amount of glucose pouring into the bloodstream. Some may produce it faster or slower - when eaten by themselves - but this is largely irrelevant as what is eaten along with these foods can typically have an even larger effect. For example, when fat is added to any carbohydrate regardless of "glycemic index" the rate at which the glucose hits the blood will be slowed and delayed - but the total glycemic impact or "area under the curve" will remain unchanged.

Throw meter margin of error into the mix, and I have found that grams of carbohydrates is the most accurate way to assess foods and what impact they may have. YMMV.

If you're talking about short-term spikes, I may be off point because I don't have those. Nonetheless, perhaps looking at what you combine with those foods in the same meal might be more productive than assuming vast differences between like number of grams of this or that carb source. Mostly, that means adding some fat to the meal containing something which spiked you previously which should significantly reduce the spike from that same food.




Apart from the obvious sugar, I am interested because we have found by testing that if hubby has bread his sugars quickly spike, but he can eat reasonable amounts of potatoes without too many problems. Cooked tomatoes are ok, but raw ones spike him.
What food problems do others have?


Salim Morgan, T2
58 Years Old
DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Ketogenic (Most of the time)
Exercise: 24 minute bike ride 5 days/wk
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
Grandkids: 11
Edited 6/2011: +1 yr of age, less exercise :(, +2 more grandkids :)

#4
Patient254

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oranges and cereal
Laura
T1 Latest A1C is: 5.4

#5
jmcquate

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I find that it's not the only carbs in meal but the amount of food too. If I eat a large steak, my BG wili spike without insuline

#6
Shadawbi

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I cut out all fruit, all breads,pasta, rice & cereals. Once I got my levels under control consistently I've started playing around a bit to see if I can tolerate different things. So far berries are OK, even strawberries, & even without other foods. I had a few french fries tonight & didn't spike, but everything else on my plate was protien & fats. I can gob ketchup on my eggs as longs as the eggs are made with cheese. A single pear spiked me past 170 for 3 hours so no more fruit experiments for me..LOL.I can't do oatmeal, but someone suggested Steel cut oats & I may try them. I can eat granola bars, but only if they are South Beach or Atkins brands. I love the sprouted grain bread from Trader Joes, but I can't get there often. I have found that a whole grain Pepperidge farm flat bread (they come as a top & bottom, like a bun--I only eat one half, not both pieces) does not spike me as long as I slather it with butter or mayo. Milk affects me adversely but I do fine with coconut or almond milk. I'm still learning as this is still pretty much the beginning of my journey.
Type 2 diagnosed Jan.2011. Caretaker for husband who was shot in the head & suffered a severe traumatic brain injury during a robbery in June 2008. He is a miracle! Mother to a wonderful 17 yr old daughter with learning disabilities. Yes, my plate is very full!:eek:

I take Metformin 500mg 3X/day
Lantus pen 20 units at bedtime
Claritan 10mg for allergies
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Learning to eat lower carb.




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