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Average Life span for a diabetic

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#1
GregGolden

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Hi, Im just wondering if the average life span for non diabetics are the same for diabetics? And if not what is the average life span for diabetics?
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#2
DeusXM

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Supposedly people with diabetes have slightly shorter life expectancies, because having the condition makes you more suceptible to, well, everything, pretty much. However it's hard to say really. You can look at the average age of death for people with diabetes in 2005, but you've also got to remember that a lot of those people would probably have had the condition for many years and would initally not have had the benefit of new monitors and insulins. Having said that, there are quite a few individuals with diabetes who are now in their 80s and 90s, having had the condition for over 70 years.

Basically, your life expectancy is dependent on you. Keep getting good A1cs and you pretty much negate the effect of having diabetes. The flip side is also that, as a person with a major medical condition, you're probably going to pay more attention to your health and see doctors more regularly, so you might even end up with a longer than average lifespan.

Bottom line is, if you look after yourself, you'll probably make it to the late 70s/early 80s. If you don't, you'll probably be lucky to make it past 60. As ever, the ball is in your court.
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#3
JediSkipdogg

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The hardest part to remember is money. Seeing all of those doctors gets expensive, so you have to remember to start saving money when you are young or you won't have the money then. So most likely you will just skip an appointment here or there and not worry.

Also, you may have other problems, I don't know anyone that is 70 years old and on an insulin pump. Definitely not a person that has been on one for 50 years. So it would be interesting to see what happens to a person's skin that has been poked at and had a catheter in it in other places over 50 years. Not to mention could you be able to still put an infusion set in when you are 70-80 years old? Or even give a shot. So again, extra money to have the young 25 year old nurse do it for you. Or just save the money and find someone that age to take care of you.

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#4
Simons

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I may be able to add a little information here as far as life expectancy for a D. I have been insulin dependent, type 1 for 62 and a half years, since June of 1943. I still live by myself. But my D has been more difficult to control in the last 4 or 5 years.
Mayo wanted to put me on a pump four years ago but i was unable to do so because I am ultra sensitive to any type of tape. And the companies could not figure out any other way than using tape to hold the inserted needle in place.
I take four or more shots of insulin a day. The amoumnt I take depends on my blood sugar.
A D can do anything they want to do if they really put their mind to it.
Simons :dontknow:

#5
Mick

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Ms. Simons is my hero--has been for several years now! I figure she's got me by 22 years in this diabetes game, so whenever I figure MY life expectancy, I always add 22 to wherever I am and take it from there--and she's still going strong! So I should, by her example, live past 75--which is longer than either of my (nondiabetic) parents did. Can't complain. Remember--by the standards and expectations of the year of my diagnioses (1965), I should not have lived much past my 35th birthday! If I double that, then it's all gravy...

Michael

#6
Diana

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The average, according to diabetes care journal, (feb '04, vol 27) is 12.8 years less than normal for men, and 12.2 less for women with diabetes. But this is from a study done in 1997, so if you think about the advances we have made since then.. well thats got to up the odds a bit..

You can look at the average age of death for people with diabetes in 2005, but you've also got to remember that a lot of those people would probably have had the condition for many years and would initally not have had the benefit of new monitors and insulins.

Yep, I agree. If you think of someone who has had diabetes for 25 years today, well they had far inferior insulins, testing, and all the rest for so long. Even when I just think back to the differences from when I was diagnosed in 1998, to now, just 8 years on, we've come a huge way.. When I was diagnosed, two shots a day was standard, hardly anyone had even heard of a pump, and we didnt know much about the GI index. So when I hear all these horor stories about people who have lived with diabetes for x many years and have lost limbs/vision, etc, I try to remember that they had to deal with their diabetes with so much less than we have today. When Ive had it for 25 years, i expect to be a good bit healthier than the average person who has had it for 25 years today.

Type 1 since 1998
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Animas IR1200 from 2005


#7
sydneya

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:dito: :dito: :dito: Again, I agree with everything that has been said. Life is good in 2005--great medical technology, great medical treatment. If we use this technology to our advantage and keep the BG's under control, I believe I will live as long as any non diabetic. If I let depression hit, or have a "I don't care attitude", I'll still live as long as any non diabetic with a I don't care attitude. A few years ago, that wouldn't be the case.
Now my mother-in-law doesn't agree with me. She feels that I don't have to worry about bettering myself so I have the ability to take care of myself if anything happens to her son. She says, " You are the one with diabetes. You can't possably outlive him." My question is--what is a good come back. She is a sweet, gentle woman. This is just how she feels. I tell her what I told you--modern technology and a good attitude is going to get me a long way. She says, "You have diabetes. You're going to die." :help:
" Those who wait for roast duck to fly in mouth must wait a very long time. If you need something, don't wait. Go get it."

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Syd--20 years Type II diabetes 18 years insulin dependent.

#8
rzrbks

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Father-in-law has been at it for 40+ years and it is only after he hit his mid-70s that problems began to set in.

He is a recovering alcoholic (AA for over 12 years) but he never really abused food, and except for the alcohol, he was always in very good shape.
"I am wounded," he said, "wounded, and it will never heal."

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#9
Penny

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:dito: :dito: :dito: She is a sweet, gentle woman. This is just how she feels. I tell her what I told you--modern technology and a good attitude is going to get me a long way. She says, "You have diabetes. You're going to die." :help:


You say "Thank you Mother Dearest for your kind words." :whistling My husband is a heavy smoker, ten years older than I am, though he is thin and in shape. Because of the problems GM is having, my GM retiree husband has been a little worried about our pension and health insurance. He has been paying extra for many years to make sure I would get part of his pension and still have insurance if something happens to him. His dear Mother told him he should stop paying for me, as I would surely die before he did, and if GM goes "belly up" (and me), we would have wasted "all that money". After almost 40 years, I just smile sweetly, and say "Thank you for your wise words." Then we just do as we see best. :smile: It's for the best.
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] Love doesn't make the world go around, but it makes the ride worthwhile.

#10
Dewey

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:dito: :dito: :dito: Again, I agree with everything that has been said. Life is good in 2005--great medical technology, great medical treatment. If we use this technology to our advantage and keep the BG's under control, I believe I will live as long as any non diabetic. If I let depression hit, or have a "I don't care attitude", I'll still live as long as any non diabetic with a I don't care attitude. A few years ago, that wouldn't be the case.
Now my mother-in-law doesn't agree with me. She feels that I don't have to worry about bettering myself so I have the ability to take care of myself if anything happens to her son. She says, " You are the one with diabetes. You can't possably outlive him." My question is--what is a good come back. She is a sweet, gentle woman. This is just how she feels. I tell her what I told you--modern technology and a good attitude is going to get me a long way. She says, "You have diabetes. You're going to die." :help:

Hi Sydney,

I think that your mother-in-law's thoughts on Diabetics' life expectancies fall under "misguided"...What I mean is, I thought my grand-mother-in-law would outlive my mother-in-law, cause she was (93 and) still going strong, whereas my mother-in-law was suffering from Parkinson's & Type II Diabetes (in her 70s). Boy, was I wrong....there were 3 aneurysms in Grand-mother-in-law's brain, and she died right around her 94th Birthday. One would have thought I'd learn that lesson when I lost my father (at 39 years of age) in '88 (from a brain aneurysm). Also, when I read the part - "You have Diabetes. You're going to die," I immediately thought, 'hate to inform her, but News Flash.....We're All going to die someday. There's no guarantee as to when, why or how. Any of us could easily live a long, healthy life or die tomorrow. Being in good health does not prevent one from passing away sooner, it's just good protection from ailments like colds, flus, etc.' I hope I don't sound too rash, but just wanted people to know that there are no guarantees with life, regardless of what medical statistics or others say. Hope this helps.

ALL my love, Carwy & Best wishes for many healthy years to come! :love:
Saying prayers for him & all our friends, every day.
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#11
ontheway

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My father's aunt had Type 1 diabetes all of her life, gave herself shots, stayed away from sugar, and died in 1968 at the ripe old age of 95!! She didn't have any of the modern medicines, etc....just good genes and common sense.
We all have hope!! :tee:

#12
Maddogg

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In the documentary "Supersize Me" theres a section on diabetes (almost entirely type 2 diabetes) but some fancy american doctor said that american diabetics can expect to lose, on average, 17 years of lifespan!! Thats a lot! And i hope he's just saying taht to scare people. I'm also guessing its for type 2 diabetics because being out of shape or overweight is bad for anybody, but more so for diabetic.

#13
jen_slc

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In the documentary "Supersize Me" theres a section on diabetes (almost entirely type 2 diabetes) but some fancy american doctor said that american diabetics can expect to lose, on average, 17 years of lifespan!! Thats a lot! And i hope he's just saying taht to scare people. I'm also guessing its for type 2 diabetics because being out of shape or overweight is bad for anybody, but more so for diabetic.

I remember that too, and yeah, more in relation to T2 diabetics rather than T1 since the focus of the movie was obesity. 17 years seems a bit extreme, but I guess it's possible if you honestly don't take care of yourself at all (eat properly, exercise, lose weight).
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#14
Maddogg

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I believe he said you lost 17 years of lifespan IF you were diagnosed prior to a certain age...
I found it: William Klish, MD. Head of Dept. of Medecine, Texas Children's Hospital says: "If the diabetes starts before the age of 15, you lose somewhere between 17 and 27 years of lifespan" And as far as i know there are more overweight kids than ever nowadays!

#15
F€đ Üp & 17

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my mom always says I want live that long or I will die sooner when we argued. :argh:

#16
Sparkle

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I heard 9 years..........five times more likely to have a stroke or heartattack. Something to look forward to....best not to think too far ahead and just enjoy the moment I think.

Has made me want to do things NOW or soon anyway rather than 5 - 10 years time. Maybe thats a good thing... :confused:

#17
christie

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well i think and hope that with today's technologies of better insulins,meters,and drs care, we can be around for a good long time..just look at all of us who have diabetes for over 20 years myself included just years ago would not have been around for even that long.
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t1 since 1983,i take lantus,humalog,synthroid,lovastain,and enalapril. i look forward to being here for another 20+years.
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#18
MarkMunday

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I heard 9 years..........five times more likely to have a stroke or heartattack.

five times more likely to have a heart attack than WHO?

Based on my lipid profile, I have an extremely low risk of heart disease. And my life expectancy risk is a lot better than average. Those figures are very misleading. They are based on historical mortality figues for diabetics in general.
Type 1 since 1977. Use Lantus/NPH/Novorapid/Actrapid. On reduced-carb diet. :sheep:




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