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#1
makiro

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Here are a couple of good questions for those of you who use insulin pumps.

How reliable are they to you

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pump? If so what insurance do you have?

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pads? If so what insurance do you have?

How durable are they?

Will excessive sweating and rise in body temperature cause the pads to un-stick?


I know these are a lot of questions but I am curious about pumps, especially after being talked to about them. I know that there is a difference between what a doctor will say and what an actual owner will say about them.


Right now as some of you know, I am in school for Heating Ventilation Air Conditiong and Refrigeration. I am also a plumber and electrician. My main concerns are when I am working I will tend to sweat and will be working in the near future in the heat. I would hate to see the pads that deliver insulin to be coming off. Hopefully I can get my surgery by then to loose weight and see if I can stop taking medication for my diabetes and controlling it better with diet and exercise.



Thank you guys in advance for all replies :)

#2
poodlebone

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Here are a couple of good questions for those of you who use insulin pumps.



How reliable are they to you


For me, extremely reliable. I have not had any major issues with any of the three models of Minimed pumps I have used in the last 6 years.

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pump? If so what insurance do you have?

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pads? If so what insurance do you have?


Both my previous insurance that I had when I got my fist pump and my current insurance have covered everything. I have only had my current insurance for less than a year so I don't know what the situation is with the actual pump, but it's no problem with supplies. Since insurance companies vary from one place to the next and even within policies from the same insurer, I don't think asking who other people have will be all that helpful. My previous insurance covered everything 100% until August 2010, when they started charging 50% co-insurance for all DME. I had enough extra to tide me over until my new insurance started and was relieved they had 100% DME coverage. My pump warranty expires in June and that's also when my insurance may change again so I don't know what will happen.

How durable are they?


I have a Minimed pump. I've dropped it on the floor (hard wood, linoleum, tile, carpet) and nothing has happened. Once I dropped it in the toilet. :( I've banged it up against things as I walked by (I keep mine clipped inside the front pocket of my jeans/pants/shorts/whatever). I can't speak for the other brands of pumps.

Will excessive sweating and rise in body temperature cause the pads to un-stick?


Possibly. SOme people seem to have problems keeping the infusion sets in place and some don't. Even in the summer when I sweat my sets stay on. There are adhesives and tapes you can use if you need extra help. For men, it helps to make sure the site you choose is free of hair so shaving a small area helps if you have body hair.

I know these are a lot of questions but I am curious about pumps, especially after being talked to about them. I know that there is a difference between what a doctor will say and what an actual owner will say about them.


Right now as some of you know, I am in school for Heating Ventilation Air Conditiong and Refrigeration. I am also a plumber and electrician. My main concerns are when I am working I will tend to sweat and will be working in the near future in the heat. I would hate to see the pads that deliver insulin to be coming off. Hopefully I can get my surgery by then to loose weight and see if I can stop taking medication for my diabetes and controlling it better with diet and exercise.


I have a desk job and live in the Northeast so excessive heat, sweating and working in confined spaces isn't an issue for me.

Some insurance companies will only cover pumps for a Type 1. Some will cover pumps for a Type 2 if their c-peptide is low enough. Most insurance companies require you to be on MDI before starting a pump, 3 or more daily injections of long & fast insulin. Some may cover a pump only if you can't get control on injections. For some, if they see a high A1c they feel a pump could be useful. Others will look to see if you have a history of low blood sugars, especially ones that cause 911 calls and trips to the ER. The only way to know for sure is to start the process with your insurance company and find out what their requirements are. Some doctors will make it hard for you to get a pump as well.

I think the bottom line is that from what you've said, you'll need to have a very understanding insurance company. IF is truly is possible for you to get off all meds with weight loss, diet & exercise, then I'm assuming you're still making insulin. That can be the dealbreaker when it comes to being approved for a pump.
--
Liz
Type 1 dx 4/1987
Minimed Paradigm 723 Revel + CGMS
13mm Silhouettes + Sure-T infusion sets
Lifescan Ultra meters
Last A1c: 7/10: 5.4

#3
morrisma

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I have a minimed pump as well. Very reliable. Covered as DME (durable medical equipment) at 75% with current insurance. I have a copay on supplies which seems to cover at about 2/3rds. I used to have a sweat problem with inset infusion sets but quicksets have been great. I rarely lose one. I use IV Prep before inserting the quicksets and that seems to help.
Good luck
Mike

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
Type 1 since 1988
Pumping since 2002
CGMS since 2010


#4
makiro

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Liz, thank you so much for your input!

I am producing insulin, but not enough, my endo told me that he expects for me to either take only a small amount of medication if any at all. The weight loss surgeon saw my history and said that he won't be surprised if I don't have to take any medications after the surgery.

I will look into the infusion sets and see how they are.

#5
makiro

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Thanks Mike, I will look into the IV prep. :)

#6
Chanson13

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Here are a couple of good questions for those of you who use insulin pumps.

How reliable are they to you

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pump? If so what insurance do you have?

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pads? If so what insurance do you have?

How durable are they?

Will excessive sweating and rise in body temperature cause the pads to un-stick?



My pump is an old Cozmo (no longer available and currently out of warranty) that I got in 2003. Actually, I ran it into a bannister and broke it 5 years ago, so this one is not 9 years old. It is reliable. Never had a problem with the pump itself.

My insurance covers up to $3,500.00 for "durable medical equipment." which is about one-half the cost of a pump. Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield.

My insurance covers 80% of the infusion sites ("pads?") However, I order them through a supplier that accepts just the 80% as payment in full - so I don't pay anything for the infusions sites, cartridges, IV prep pads.

Durability - great.

As to "un-sticking" I've really never had a problem with that. I just use the IV prep wipes before installing the infusion site, and it sticks pretty well. Even in summer, after sweating through a soccer game, I've not had a problem.

There are systems that you can use to ensure the stick-to-it-ivness of the infusion sites.
Type 1 since 1976
Pumping since 2003

#7
bdelatte

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I think u should get one honestly. They are very very reliable and if you are willing to do the work they are very beneficial and for me has changed my life. They are also very durable. When you first get one you are kind of worried to lay on it or whatever b/c you arent used to it but now i sleep with it and roll all over the thing and its no concern. As far as the sweating. There have been only a couple times where in the summer it started to unstick, however, I know now that if you put like bandaids on each side of it itll hold it down and not come undone (at least it hasnt failed me yet!). good luck!
Diabetics are naturally sweet! ;)
Animas OneTouch Ping Insulin Pump
A1C 6.0

#8
makiro

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Thank you guys for the input. I talked to my doctor's nurse over the phone and she said that he may not recommend it because of my surgery in May. That if after my surgery, if I still need to depend on insulin, then yest. Otherwise it will not be worth it but it is a good idea to get informed and ready in case I do need one.

I still need to see him or get him to prescribe me some long lasting and bolus because I'm already out of my 70/30 and have to take more fast acting than what I think would be normal.

#9
Glucose Kid

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Reliable Insulin Pumps, well the technology is changing, but's it's no replacement for the Pancreas that is functioning. There is a lot of parts that make a Insulin Pump function to deliver the right about of insulin at the right times.
Problems? Infusion sets are not perfect, since they attach to your SubQ skin surface condition plays a big role in whether or not the your site will leak insulin and before you know it your at 400 on your glucose meter. Occulsions or air bubbles in the line as well are problems. Battery power? Carry a spare battery.
Training? Know how to work your pump to it's fullest advantage, ask lot's of questions to the manufacturer and support personnel. The support at Animas is sub par, we had a number of issues getting support help, training, supplies and getting a "real" person to call us back, I would not recommend Animas Ping. Check out Minimed or Deltec.

#10
picman322

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My Animas Ping has been super-reliable for the last two years. I've bumped it and scratched it on many different surfaces and it's never given me any functional trouble at all. I'm surprised to hear that people have had problems with the Animas customer service. Once my insurance was confirmed, they worked hard to get me my pump very quickly (as I was excited to start using it). The only issue I had was that the rubber seal that covers one of the buttons cracked slightly last year. I called the Animas Customer Service number on the back of the pump. They asked me a few questions and OVERNIGHTED a brand new pump to me.

Excessive sweating or long-term exposure to water could cause the adhesive to come loose, but I've never had that happen. I play soccer for 8 weeks over the summer and detach my pump during games. I end up sweating a lot and have never had any issues with the adhesive coming loose. The only time I've had a site come loose is during a vacation where we swam for hours every day. The water tended to loosen the adhesive a bit. My nephew uses the same pump and he usually uses 3M medical tape over the top of the adhesive to keep it sticking while swimming. That works well for him, but I haven't tried it yet.

Anyway, if you end up needing the pump after your surgery, I'm sure it will work well for you. I spent 31 years doing daily insulin injections and I can tell you that the last two years with the pump have been the best ever. Less needle pokes and more control are good things! Best of luck!

#11
confussedt2

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HAVE ANY OF YOU CHECKED OUT THE OMNIPUMP YET,i believe it has not been out very long,it looks like it is self contained and
about the size of a computer mouse but only holds i believe 200 units of insulin.
10/17/2010
glucose-139
creatinine0.99
calcium 8.7
total cholesterol 171
trigl. 194
hdl cholesterol 36
tot/hdl 4.75
A1c 6.8
average glucose 148
Levemir
metfor
NOVOLOG

#12
jbmacomber

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I have medtronic minimed pump and CGM. Only problems I have with adhesiveness is tegaderm tape kind o f dissolves whrn swimming, but infusion sets do not, even if sweating. I dont sweat everyday but when working hard, swimming I have no problems. I am new to pump but love it, but agree with waiting to see if you need it after surgery. My insurance pays 80% of everything, even so costs take a big chunk out of budget.

My insurance covers 80% of the infusion sites ("pads?") However, I order them through a supplier that accepts just the 80% as payment in full - so I don't pay anything for the infusions sites, cartridges, IV prep pads.


I would love to know the name of this supplier!!!!!
Diagnosed 2004
AIC 8/13 5.8
A1C 2/12 7.4

Started Insulin 2/12
Started Pump and CGM 5/12
Medtronic Minimed Pump
Meds:
Novolog,
Lisinopril
Ambien

#13
Kathryn10

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My pump has always been very reliable. I am on my second one now and I've been pumping since 2007. My first pump still worked, but I was starting to get error messages every now and then and was at a good place in terms of insurance coverage so I made the leap to get a new one.
The insurance I had at the time I got my new pump was a Cigna PPO. My pump was around $6500 retail? It's a Minimed pump. I ended up having to pay approximately $1,000 out of pocket, and Medtronic didn't bill me for it until 9 months after I received my new pump.
If you mean infusion sets and reservoirs when you say pads, then my insurance companies have never really covered the cost of them. When I had BCBS of IL, I had to pay $600 for a 3 month supply of infusion sets and reservoirs. When I had Cigna, it was much less (maybe $100??? amazing discount!) because I was insured through a much larger company. Now I have Humana and I pay $500 for a 3 month supply. I'd love to know of any other suppliers where you can get the supplies for less!
My pumps have always been pretty durable. I've dropped them and run into things with them on and have not had any issues. I usually keep my pump hooked on to my bra so I think that helps avoid it being hit or snagged on things as often as that might happen if I were to wear it in my pants pocket or something.
High temps and sweating have not caused the infusion set to un-stick. I typically shower twice per day and have no issues with it coming un-stuck before I'm ready to replace the infusion set/reservoir. The only issue I've ever had was when I was pregnant - if the sonogram lady put that goopy stuff on my infusion site, it would un-stick shortly after. Besides that, no issues.

#14
bdelatte

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How reliable are they to you Very reliable. I love mine. It is a lot more convenient for me and its the best decision I have ever made about my diabetes when I got one last year.

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pump? If so what insurance do you have? My insurance covered majority of it. I think my pump outright was over $6,000 and I paid $1,900...still a lot of money for me but compared to 6 grand i cant complain.

Does your insurance cover the cost of the pads? If so what insurance do you have? I have a deductible of 1,000 each year then when i reach that my insurance covers 80% of the supplies. Unfortunately its classified as a durable medical supply so i have to reach the deductible first. I wish it was under the same category as my insulin itself b/c its covered 80% all the time. I have Pekin insurance.

How durable are they? Very durable. When i first got mine i was nervous about sleeping with it...now i roll all over the darn thing. Ive dropped it ive ran it into walls on accident , etc....its durable.

Will excessive sweating and rise in body temperature cause the pads to un-stick? I have noticed in the summer months if i am outside in sun and sweating it will start to unstick but there are ways around that. I put bandaids on each side of the pad to hold it in place. Ive never had a problem with one coming out if i do this when i know ill be in heat and sweaty. I was out in sun all weekend and 90 degree weather on a boat and it got really hot/sweaty...i stuck the bandaids on each side of it and never have a problem...it leaves some killler tan lines tho lol
Diabetics are naturally sweet! ;)
Animas OneTouch Ping Insulin Pump
A1C 6.0




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