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AntiBiotics connected to T1

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#1
JohnSchroeder

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http://www.medicalne...cles/312462.php

 

Gist of the article is that using antibiotics kills your gut bacteria in addition to whatever sickness causing bacteria you have at the time.  Gut bacteria now believed to play a role in training our immune system in knowing what to attack and not attack.

 

Use of antibiotics can potentially inhibit this learning, making the body more likely to misfire and have an autoimmune response.


Bolus: Humalog Pen 8-12 units

Basal: Levimir 32-34 units

March 2016: 6.2

June 2016: 5.9

October 2016: 6.6  Yuck! time to pay better attention

January 2017 6.0


#2
Fraser

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Interesting article of course, based on a 3% per year increase but if the world population is growing at about 1.5.
And I would think that in the world as a whole diagnosing is becoming more accurate.
Combine those two factors and the percentage of the population being diagnose is the same or a very small amount of an increase.

He could be completely correct, I just dont think his numbers add up. Correct me if I you think I miscalculated.

Although no question in my mind that antibiotics are over used.

Edited by Fraser, 23 August 2016 - 04:47 PM.

Dx 2009 A1c 12.0 fasting 325
10/2016 Lab test 5.6
01/2017Home test 5.5
Diet and Exercise Only
No Meds

#3
JohnSchroeder

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Interesting article of course, based on a 3% per year increase but if the world population is growing at about 1.5.
And I would think that in the world as a whole diagnosing is becoming more accurate.
Combine those two factors and the percentage of the population being diagnose is the same or a very small amount of an increase.

He could be completely correct, I just dont think his numbers add up. Correct me if I you think I miscalculated.

Although no question in my mind that antibiotics are over used.

 

Not sure if you miscalculated or not.  Without looking at the actual study and methodology its anyone's guess.  My take on it was that it would be a 3% increase per capita.. meaning it takes population into account.

 

The ramification of this in my mind is that if the hypothesis is true, you should see a similar rise in all sorts of auto-immune diseases, not just T1D.  That should be easily measurable.  And you might also compare against populations that do not have access to antibiotics, to see if the rates of autoimmune diseases are steady/lower there.

 

Both (at least to me) would seem like simple census level/survey studies that could quickly and cheaply be done.


Bolus: Humalog Pen 8-12 units

Basal: Levimir 32-34 units

March 2016: 6.2

June 2016: 5.9

October 2016: 6.6  Yuck! time to pay better attention

January 2017 6.0


#4
Fraser

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Ok you win, not saying anything other than I get too confused reading a lot the info.
I will admit my bias against all these studies is more attuned to the reported rise in t2,
Which never seen seems t o include the lowering definition of T2 or the technology advances of
Determaning t2
As far as I am concerned a cure for all is great.
Dx 2009 A1c 12.0 fasting 325
10/2016 Lab test 5.6
01/2017Home test 5.5
Diet and Exercise Only
No Meds

#5
notme

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I tend to believe the article. I think we will find that all of the antibiotics we took as kids for (me it was ear infection, and kidney issues as a kid) are coming back to haunt. I had chronic ear infections as a kid and then got a massive kidney infection that required years of antibiotics at age 7. There is antibiotics in milk, meat and many other dairy products we eat today.

I have often wondered if there was a link. Nothing scientific from me. Just a (gut) feeling the study may be on to something.
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#6
Joisey

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I have stopped taking antibiotics and replaced them with probiotics. I now seem to have less infections and get over them quicker.



#7
ant hill

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I have been looking at the Treg Discovery whare the Thymus is a gland just below the Thyriod this gland don't last long in everyones bodies as it just turns into a kind of fat say in your mid teens as the immune system then migrates to the Lymph Nodes and Other Immune systems like the Spleen & Bone Marrow hence the Vit D that most of us take nowdays.

Getting to the Antibiotics it's like a field of sheep happily grassing on grass when suddenly a Fox appears, This is what they Thymus is there for but the Antibiotics makes the thymus think otherwise and then Diabetes appears as the immune system looks for the Islets (insulin) to attack and other body cells.


Without Islets, We cannot control the flow of Insulin

 

Therefore there's no such thing as Perfect Control.

Peter.... :)


#8
dowling gram

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I can attest to the fact that antibiotics kill gut bacteria. I have taken very few antibiotics in my lifetime. Mainly because I was a pretty healthy individual.

 

3 years ago my husband and I got a very bad flu that hung on for weeks. We finally went to the doctor and she said it started as a virus but has turned into a bacterial infection so she put us on an antibiotic. A week after we finished the prescription I felt it was coming back. I had bad diarrhea again. I mentioned it to my pharmacist and he said it was likely that the antibiotic had killed the good gut bacteria and told me to try a probiotic.  3 days later I felt fine and back to normal. Since I eat yogurt almost daily now I've given up the pills

 

In some cases poor gut bacteria may cause diabetes. I wouldn't know or even hazard a guess but if it is I don't think it is the sole cause.  In ,my opinion, just like every diabetic is different the causes are different and varied and can't be blamed on 1 thing


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#9
DeusXM

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The link between antibiotics and gut bacteria is well established, that's why they carry warnings that the side-effects include 'loose stool'.

 

Not sure about the link between T1 and gut bacteria but it all fits in with the 'hygiene hypothesis', the idea that an immune system that isn't challenged enough by 'real' pathogens becomes over-reactive to things which are perfectly healthy and normal.

 

I know I certainly had antibiotics as a child but I couldn't tell you whether or not my intake was higher than average, although I could tell you that the consequences of not having those antibiotics would have been worse than having T1. I was never one of those kids whose parents insist on getting antibiotics for a cold, but I did have 'walking pneumonia' which definitely required medical intervention.


Edited by DeusXM, 25 August 2016 - 04:18 AM.

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#10
NoraWI

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I spent my early childhood in a colonial country before penicillin. So, no antibiotics there but lots of exposure to all kinds of bacteria. I spent my teen years in a tropical culture where no prescription was required for antibiotics. Was still very healthy and never took any. However, T1 diabetes runs in my family. At age 62 I got T1, 15 years after husband had surgery for a brain tumor and a stressful, incomplete recovery. Stress was rampant for years. About 10 years afterwards, I got cellulitis after a cat scratch on my hand and surgery for it plus 4 days in hospital with antibiotic IV, followed by 10 days at home continuing the antibiotic in pill form. Four months before my DM symptoms arose, my farm helper, a retired man, had a heart attack and died on the spot on the farm. So... what "caused" my DM? Heredity? Stress? Antibiotics? Who knows! Maybe all three?

Edited by NoraWI, 25 August 2016 - 07:53 AM.

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