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Early Short-term Intensive Insulin Causes the Remission of Type 2 Diabetes

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#1
georgepds

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http://www.diabetesi...ype-2-diabetes/

 

"Again these results demonstrate that in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes with elevated fasting glucose levels, a 2- to 3-week course of intensive insulin therapy can successfully lay a foundation for prolonged good glycemic control. The ease with which normoglycemia is achieved on insulin may predict those patients who can later succeed in controlling glucose levels with attention to diet alone. "
 
 
"Practice Pearls:
Early at diagnosis, short-term insulin treatment can provide better glucose control.
Starting on insulin soon after diagnosis can impact future treatments.
Insulin sooner than later that is reducing glucotoxicity has many benefits, including reducing the complications from diabetes."


#2
Bishop

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http://www.diabetesi...ype-2-diabetes/

 

"Again these results demonstrate that in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes with elevated fasting glucose levels, a 2- to 3-week course of intensive insulin therapy can successfully lay a foundation for prolonged good glycemic control. The ease with which normoglycemia is achieved on insulin may predict those patients who can later succeed in controlling glucose levels with attention to diet alone. "
 
 
"Practice Pearls:
Early at diagnosis, short-term insulin treatment can provide better glucose control.
Starting on insulin soon after diagnosis can impact future treatments.
Insulin sooner than later that is reducing glucotoxicity has many benefits, including reducing the complications from diabetes."

 

 

A few thoughts after a quick scan:

  1. I believe Dr. B has (without agenda, which is not always a given for a number of these studies) pushed for this sort of protocol with newly diagnosed T2 folks.
  2. I realize the economics are difficult and almost always unnecessary (from a business profit point of view), but I wish there were more long term studies and ones where long term was something over 5 years at a minimum.  In this case, we have “…and even induce a remission of diabetes that can last up to one year in some patients.”
  3. No mention of nutrition and the diet side of things.  So in the worst case, there could be a very high carb element in play, masked by even more insulin in the system of a insulin resistant individual.  I can see how the short term results would be fantastic, but the longer term results aren’t as clear.  Ultimately, new protocols without explicit and strong nutritional involvement seem like a red flag.  But maybe that’s just me.
  4. I did learn about the Matsuda index (new to me), vs. the usual insulin clamp, as a way to quantify and measure IR.  Nifty.

Edited by Bishop, 12 September 2016 - 02:11 PM.

2015.05.28  A1C at 13.2 (DX)
2015.08.28  A1C at  6.0 (3 months after DX)
2015.11.21  A1C at  5.6 (6 months after DX)
2016.02.16  A1C at  5.5 (9 months after DX)
2016.07.31  A1C at  5.7 (14 months after DX)
 
No medication of any kind, so far.  
Mild-to-moderate lifestyle changes tied to measurement, nutrition and physical activity.
All of the standard disclaimers apply - everyone is different, what works for Luke may not work for Leia, observing A leading to B doesn't prove anything, there is no cure, etc.
 
( blog should have most up to date details and thoughts )

#3
OldTech

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So they are proposing more insulin for type 2s who already have too much insulin leading to higher levels of hyperinsulinemia. Good, I think not!

 

I don't recall Dr. Bernstien ever suggesting this. In fact, I would think that he would call it dangerous. His motto is to always minimize insulin using low carb.


--Chet

 

Type 2. Diagnosed 12/2013. Last A1c 4.5. Average postprandial 86. Very little variability. Very low carb and metformin (2x500mg). Two meals a day with no snacks. Last updated 2/18/2015.





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