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Eddy

difference between "A1c" and "glycated hemoglobin"?

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While going through my time-of-DX hospital records, I noticed "glycated hemoglobin" of 19.0%. The reference range was <I forget the low end> to 7.8%, so it's apparently different than A1c... but I was even more over-the-top on that value.

 

Web searches tell me "glycated hemoglobin = A1c"... but the paperwork does not corroborate.

 

This perplexes me. Any thoughts?

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Ehhh... I did the Google/Wikipedia thing already, looong before posting, and would tend to believe that... except one test showing 12.9% and another test showing 19.0%? That seems to be a bit of a divergence, even accounting for different methods...

 

 

I hope you don't put 100% faith in any lab test. I sure don't. lab test errors - Google Search

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I hope you don't put 100% faith in any lab test. I sure don't. lab test errors - Google Search

 

Nope.

 

But both tests were performed at the hospital, within 24 hours of one another. And 12.9 and 19.0 are very different numbers. And, again, the reference ranges differed significantly...

 

...so I wondered if anyone else had any clues. I thought that I might be overlooking something simple and obvious.

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There ARE 2 sets of numbers. One is a percentage, the other a raw number.

The percentage is what gets used.

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The only other test I know of is the fructosamine test, but I would have expected it to be referred to as a "glycated protein" test.

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There ARE 2 sets of numbers. One is a percentage, the other a raw number.

 

I thought both numbers were expressed as percentages. (Where did I put that packet?)

 

The only other test I know of is the fructosamine test, but I would have expected it to be referred to as a "glycated protein" test.

 

I'm certain that it said "hemoglobin".

 

I'll dig out the packet, reread to see if I'm in error about percentage/"hemoglobin", and take it from there. Thanks for the leads, guys! :)

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I wonder if both numbers were indeed A1c tests, performed via different methods.

 

I should mention that, during the two months prior to DX, I'd been taking large quantities of vitamin C -- 55-80 g/day, with 65 g/day on average. Perhaps the high ascorbic acid consumption affected different tests differently.

 

Vitamin C, glycation, glycohemoglobin and aging

 

Or, maybe it was what Lloyd said. Where did I put that packet?

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There are several types of hemoglobin in a red blood cell. The glycosylated Hemoglobin measures how much sugar is stuck to all of The different kinds of hemoglobin in a red blood cell while the hemoglobin A1c measures how much sugar is stuck to a particular kind of hemoglobin - hemoglobin A1. The normal range for the A1C is about 2% lower then the total glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels.

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There are several types of hemoglobin in a red blood cell. The glycosylated Hemoglobin measures how much sugar is stuck to all of The different kinds of hemoglobin in a red blood cell while the hemoglobin A1c measures how much sugar is stuck to a particular kind of hemoglobin - hemoglobin A1. The normal range for the A1C is about 2% lower then the total glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels.

 

This meshes well, considering that the top end of the "glycated hemoglobin" range was 7.8% -- which is indeed about two percentage points above the top end of the A1c range.

 

Thanks. :)

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