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Russell A.

Pump batteries

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I read an old post yesterday regarding pros and cons of different pumps. There was a comment rearding lithium batteries lasting longer in a pump.

 

I was told not to use a lithium bat. in any pump by my last trainer. Has anyone else heard of that?

 

Russell

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I use the Animas Ping and it states right in the owner manual to use Lithium batteries, and if I do use alkaline batteries the life of the batteries will be less. Do not see why you could not use lithium in any pump, but then again I am new at this.:)

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I've always followed the recommendation by Mini Med to use "Energizer" batteries in my pump. I have been tempted to try Litiums, but with my luck, my pump would stop working! LOL

 

Karen

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I'm with Karen, my Cozmo trainer recommended "Bunny Batteries" (Energizer) and I've just stuck with them. I usually get 2-3 weeks out of a battery because I use the light a lot and also my screen displays for my cozmonitor.

 

Mich

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I'm with Karen, my Cozmo trainer recommended "Bunny Batteries" (Energizer) and I've just stuck with them. I usually get 2-3 weeks out of a battery because I use the light a lot and also my screen displays for my cozmonitor.

 

Mich

 

It doesn't matter what make of battery you use as long as it is the right sort.

Cozmo state that only alkaline batteries are to be used in the cozmo.

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I have mm 722 and have used lithium batteries and it does last longer but when it dies it dont give much warning.

 

Using an Energizeer will give you at least an 8 hour warning. Using lithiums you may get no warning. You will get much longer use out of lithiums though. There are no warranty issues that I'm aware of.

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As per minimed instructions, I usually use the Energizers. I tested the Energizer "Ultimate", (it might be called something different near you, the top alkaline Energizer), and I found it did give about 20% more life, and importantly, I felt a lot more low battery warning.

 

Hard to be definitive though as I find batteries wear quite variably, probably due to things like temp basals, batteries, alarms, using the light, etc.

 

While they are more expensive, if you see them on sale they may be well worth a try if longer life is an issue.

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As this is brought up all the time the reasoning is...sorry for the following image being so large...

 

AALiAlkComparison05A.jpg

 

 

 

As you can see Alkaline batteries die evenly over time. They lose their voltage at a pretty steady pace. Pumps measure battery life by voltage from what I've determined. As the voltage drops it registers the different bars for battery life. The pumps are programmed based on that voltage info. With a lithium ion it holds a strong charge for quite a while and then simply dies off. Pumps are not programmed for this sharp voltage change.

 

Animas has gone a step further and they have programmed the pump (based on the user saying if a lithium or an alkaline is in the pump) to be able to tell both voltage changes. This allows the user to select any battery and the pump will properly give the correct battery bars. Why other pumps haven't done it I won't know. Kinda amazes me since it's only a programming change and nothing else in the pump.

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As per Animas, I use lithium batteries. When I was using a MiniMed pump I used Energizer batteries as per MiniMed. I just follow the manufacturers guidelines.

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Thanks for all your input. I now remember the comment my (Cozmo) trainer made: The Lithium did not give any warning before going out and it could possibly damage the pump.

 

I know with my MM they said not to use Duracell and I did have some issues when I tried them in my 712.

 

I am going on 6 months on the same battery with my Cozmonitor. It is the sole meter I use. What kind of battery life are you finding with the meter?

 

Russell

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Animas actually send me out Lithium batteries as part of my supplies, so it would be rude not to use them :)

 

The thing that is weird to me is the usual 'do not use rechargeable batteries' advice. Always strikes me as weird, because a well-charged NimH battery will give a decent alkaline a run for its money. A couple of years ago, I bought a 16 battery at a time charger that refreshes and charges AAA and AA batteries, and I make it a rule to not buy 'regular' batteries as this way is a lot greener and a lot kinder on the pocket.

 

My wife makes fun of the battery fetish. And other things :T

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I am going on 6 months on the same battery with my Cozmonitor. It is the sole meter I use. What kind of battery life are you finding with the meter?

 

Russell

 

I have been using a Cozmo for 5 years and am now on my second one - The Cozmonitor batteries last about a year.

George

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The thing that is weird to me is the usual 'do not use rechargeable batteries' advice. Always strikes me as weird, because a well-charged NimH battery will give a decent alkaline a run for its money. A couple of years ago, I bought a 16 battery at a time charger that refreshes and charges AAA and AA batteries, and I make it a rule to not buy 'regular' batteries as this way is a lot greener and a lot kinder on the pocket.

 

The problem is for most rechargeables, more than a great majority, that is not the case. And for most, the startout voltage is greatly under a regular alkaline or lithium and therefore upon immediate insertion the pump will think it's a dead battery. Again, simply comes down in my opinion to a simple programming of the pump. Another feature that I have yet to figure out why it hasn't been added. My Ipod Touch costs me $400 and does millions more calculations than a pump yet the pump costs 15 times as much.

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I swtiched from Energizer "regular" to their high tech lithium, found the lithium lasted twice as long, at least. But once the pump hits the 25% mark, I only let it go about 4 days and I change the battery, so have been unaware of the quick failure issues, good to know. Gary's post makes me want to at least try rechargable, though.

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I use Duracells over here, or Energizer back in the US. Had some bad experience with cheaper "no name" brands...:mad:

 

I was thinking about trying photo lithiums, the ones that are used in digital cameras... Just not sure if the Cozmo can handle them. :confused:

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The problem is for most rechargeables, more than a great majority, that is not the case. And for most, the startout voltage is greatly under a regular alkaline or lithium and therefore upon immediate insertion the pump will think it's a dead battery. Again, simply comes down in my opinion to a simple programming of the pump. Another feature that I have yet to figure out why it hasn't been added. My Ipod Touch costs me $400 and does millions more calculations than a pump yet the pump costs 15 times as much.

 

I have Duracell 2650mAh NimH batteries, and they outlast alkaline Duracells....

 

As to the iPod vs Pump, it's not just a case of electronics involved. Its a case of Apple will sell 1000 iPod touch for every Ping that Animas sell. And Apple won't have to go through the regulatory hoops to get the product to market that a medical device has to. And you don't need sales reps to sell iPod touches a unit at a time whereby with most medical devices that is exactly what you need. For all of these reasons and more, a medical device will cost far more than consumer electronics.

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I am nearly done doing a series of battery tests with my cozmo.

I am a very heavy battery user, a T2 pumping a lot of insulin, lots of alarms, back lighting, and sync with my computer.

Consider this pretty much a worst case, it seems likely the comparisons will have value though.

 

Energizer Lithium...........................13 days

Energizer Titanium...........................6 days

"our family" house brand alcoline.......5 days

"menards" house brand alcoline ........5 days

Duracell..........................................5 days

Energizer.........................................5 days

 

The battery meter does give you little warning with lithium, from when you first notice less than a full charge to battery warning alarm for an almost dead battery is about 3 or 4 hours. As a T2, that does not worry me. It would if I were a T1 and a heavy sleeper.

 

-Lloyd

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As to the iPod vs Pump, it's not just a case of electronics involved. Its a case of Apple will sell 1000 iPod touch for every Ping that Animas sell. And Apple won't have to go through the regulatory hoops to get the product to market that a medical device has to. And you don't need sales reps to sell iPod touches a unit at a time whereby with most medical devices that is exactly what you need. For all of these reasons and more, a medical device will cost far more than consumer electronics.

 

I understand the cost thing...but for the cost, you would think they could add a few extra lines of programming to read different battery types. Animas did it, so it's not an impossible task and an Animas technical person is the one that told me it's all based on voltage levels, so that would be pretty easy to program into the pump.

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The voltage drop in the lithuims is the main reason most pump companies don't want you using them.

 

For alkaline batteries, the main thing to look for the the mAH rating. This tells you how much "juice" is stored in the battery. The higher the better. I have tried the copper tops, bunny batteries, and Ray-O-Vac.

 

I am very hard on batteries because I pump so much insulin and use the screen for my cozmonitor. The Ray-O-Vac's seem to last at least 3-5 days longer.

 

They also happen to be the cheapest. I can't remember the price but a 36 pack from Wally World is not very expensive.

 

Too many battereies for you at one time? Freeze them. When you go to use them let them come to room temp slowly. They will still last as long as "fresh" batteries.

 

Ham radio operators use lots of different batteries and know how to treat them.

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