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gettingby

Accu-Chek Aviva

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Well, I decided to pull out the new Aviva I received and give it a go. I have to say that I'm not impressed.:( I read the instructions and went to do a test. I wasted 3 strips !!!!! Kept getting an E-1 reading. The manual said something about it may have been a too low bg. Tested with my trusted UltraSmart and got a 100. Should I call Accu-Chek about it??

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Well, I decided to pull out the new Aviva I received and give it a go. I have to say that I'm not impressed.:( I read the instructions and went to do a test. I wasted 3 strips !!!!! Kept getting an E-1 reading. The manual said something about it may have been a too low bg. Tested with my trusted UltraSmart and got a 100. Should I call Accu-Chek about it??

 

You mean the Nano?

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I had no problems with the Aviva I got. Getting that error message when your BG isn't actually low means something is wrong, either with the meter or strips. Call Accu-Chek and I'm sure they'll replace it.

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not very promising really is it Cin? first time with a new meter and it goes all George W Bush on you (wrong)lol

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Call Accu-Check/Roche. Ive never had good luck with the Aviva, but others have.

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I would call them. I have never had any problems with the aviva. I get more error messages with my one touch.

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I'd definitely call them about it. I've never had much problems with my Aviva. But i really don't get along with OneTouch strips :s:

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Wow, I'm not sure why you are having problems, mine has been fantastic. Call and get it replaced.

 

Tom

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I have used the Accu-Chek Aviva since I was first diagnosed in 2007. I thought it was a great meter, until I started testing other meters a few weeks ago.

 

I have been testing the following meters:

 

Accu-Chek Aviva

OneTouch Ultra2

Bayer Contour

Abbott Precision Xtra

 

Of the 4 meters, the Accu-Chek Aviva came in dead last as far as features go. It came tied with the Bayer Contour for last on accuracy. I now have a better understanding why I was going hypo in the middle of the night, when my Aviva told me my sugars were fine before going to bed.

 

The Aviva and Contour gave results that were, on average, 25 points higher the results from the OneTouch Ultra2 or the Abbott Precision Xtra.

 

Accu-Chek has NO meters that will allow for marking of pre or post-prandial test results. In fact, they are only actively selling 2 meters at this time (according to their customer service).

 

I will say, Accu-Chek has outstanding customer service. Another area where Accu-Chek (Roche) has the others beat is with their lancing device... the Multi-Clix. I would not go without mine. In fact, I've thrown away the other lancing devices that came with the other meters. I prefer the Multi-Clix.

 

After all the testing I've done, I've decided I'm switching to the OneTouch brand. I'm trying to get a OneTouch UltraSmart. It's got all the bells and whistles I am looking for. The good thing about the Ultra line... they all use the same test strips, so they can be used interchangably.

 

Anyway, sorry to steal your thread, but I wanted to get these results out.

 

Regards,

 

D

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I have used the Accu-Chek Aviva since I was first diagnosed in 2007. I thought it was a great meter, until I started testing other meters a few weeks ago.

 

I have been testing the following meters:

 

Accu-Chek Aviva

OneTouch Ultra2

Bayer Contour

Abbott Precision Xtra

 

Of the 4 meters, the Accu-Chek Aviva came in dead last as far as features go. It came tied with the Bayer Contour for last on accuracy. I now have a better understanding why I was going hypo in the middle of the night, when my Aviva told me my sugars were fine before going to bed.

 

The Aviva and Contour gave results that were, on average, 25 points higher the results from the OneTouch Ultra2 or the Abbott Precision Xtra.

 

Accu-Chek has NO meters that will allow for marking of pre or post-prandial test results. In fact, they are only actively selling 2 meters at this time (according to their customer service).

 

I will say, Accu-Chek has outstanding customer service. Another area where Accu-Chek (Roche) has the others beat is with their lancing device... the Multi-Clix. I would not go without mine. In fact, I've thrown away the other lancing devices that came with the other meters. I prefer the Multi-Clix.

 

After all the testing I've done, I've decided I'm switching to the OneTouch brand. I'm trying to get a OneTouch UltraSmart. It's got all the bells and whistles I am looking for. The good thing about the Ultra line... they all use the same test strips, so they can be used interchangably.

 

Anyway, sorry to steal your thread, but I wanted to get these results out.

 

Regards,

 

D

 

I also compared my Aviva to both my OneTouch Ultra2 and the UltraSmart.

 

The Aviva results were typically 1-1.5mmol/l points higher.

 

So if I went to bed, thinking I was ok, or a bit high, I would be mistaken.

 

I trust my OneTouch meters more then any other meter I have tried.

 

I do prefer Accu-Chek strips over the OneTouch strips tho... Just because they don't stick together and are easier to pick out of the bottle.

 

If my OneTouch strips were like that, I'd be all the happier.

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I have found the Accu-Chek Aviva meter to be useless. Eight out of ten tests result in an error message, usually E-1, sometimes E-6. I have never had any problem with the Bayer Breeze or Breeze 2. I only switched because this is what the VA sent to me. I'll call the manufacturer, but the convenience of ten test strips per load makes the Breeze 2 device a lot nicer. Besides, it shows results in about three seconds with very little blood. Strips cost $1.00 each instead of $0.80, but in the long run, the government saves a lot of money.

 

Besides, the Accu-Chek meter is upside down! :-)

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And don't bother to call their customer service number. It's a computer and it'll keep asking you questions until you're totally exasperated.

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My accucheck avia works great and is always within a couple of points of the lab. I must have lucked out with mine. I originally had a One Touch but changed to Aviva when my insurance quit paying for One Touch strips. I had the choice between freestyle and Accu Check. I did like the flagging options of the One Touch but like the test strips of the Aviva better.

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I have 4 Accu-Chek Avivas, and have never had issues. I can use any one of them and expect a reading within a few points of any other of them. I have tried the One-Touch Mini and found that it gave much more variable readings, the Presto, and found it to give readings the most comparable to the Aviva when a container of strips is first open, but to give progressively more variable readings once the container has been open a few days, the Freestyle Lite to give much higher (and more variable) readings, and the TrueTouch and TrueSense to be, basically, useless.

 

I do understand, however, that the Aviva has a reputation for reading a little high, and that can create issues for folks who have issues with lows. Jenny Ruhl has written about this in her blog, Diabetes Update.

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Many years ago, I loved my various One Touch meters. Then my insurance changed. The Aviva is one of the few choices available to me with insurance coverage we now have. That said, it works far better than I initially expected, and has proven both consistent and reliable, with very few errors. Even though I just got a new Ping to replace my 2020, I will be unable to use the remote as a meter, as insurance will not cover the OneTouch strips. I'm OK with that, as I'm lucky to have insurance to get my pump and pumping supplies. I will continue using the Aviva for BG testing. :)

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I do not understand these comparisons saying one is testing higher/lower than another meter and then saying it is not accurate. Who is to say the meter one chose is accurate? Use 4 different meters and get differing results, which is the accurate one, the one you decide is the accurate meter?.....Usually when you get an E-1 code the strip most likely is not inserted fully. If it is a low BG error, meaning a blood sample has already been placed on the strip, check the meter for the proper low BG warning number you selected for your range. But really the best test is using the control solution to see if the strips are within control range.

 

That said I have absolutely no issues with the Aviva, every so often a bad strip but otherwise flawless. In regards to customer service anytime I have called I get a person straight away after a very brief automated selection. The last time I need to get a new meter it came the very next day....free. Been doing buisness for over 15 years and never an issue.....ever.

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There is a professional study that was done comparing 27 different meters for accuracy. You can find it here:

 

http://www.bionimeusa.com/files/journal_papers/IDT_Report.pdf

 

If you save it to your computer, then open it with Adobe Acrobat reader, scroll down to page 224 and rotate the page clockwise so you can read it more easily. According to this chart the 3 most accurate meters are the Accu-Chek AVIVA, Bionime Rightest GM101 and the FreeStyle Freedom (the older one, not the new Freedom Lite). The FreeStyle Lite did pretty good too, but not nearly as well as the first three, especially the AVIVA and Bionime. Rotate the page back to normal, and the next few pages show the individual results of each test for each meter with an average bias (meaning the average high or low of the correct readings) and the range of highs and lows (the tighter the range, the more overall accuracy).

 

As you can see, some are really accurate, and some are downright inaccurate.

 

Hopefully this will help in choosing the best meters. To help understand and interpret the results:

 

If you'll notice in the last column of the chart on page 224, the Accu-Chek AVIVA was the most accurate at BG levels above 75 mg/dl with 71% of test readings within +/- 5% of being exactly correct . The FreeStyle Freedom was 2nd at 69%. What this means is that if the true lab BG level tested was 100, then the AVIVA would read between 95 mg/dl and 105 mg/dl in 71 out of 100 tests. The other 29 tests would read either below 95 mg/dl or above 105 mg/dl---so there's almost a 3 out of 4 chance that the reading is within 5%---which is MUCH better than the +/- 20% required for a meter to be deemed sufficiently accurate according to the FDA.

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I have been reading a lot about Aviva and it seems like everyone either loves them or hates them, so I guess I will be just another guinea pig since there\'s no consensus! Either way if you say that accu chek supports their products and will help me if i have any issues and I found a good deal so I will try them out. Wasn\'t happy with the walmart stuff.

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I have been reading a lot about Aviva and it seems like everyone either loves them or hates them, so I guess I will be just another guinea pig since there\'s no consensus! Either way if you say that accu chek supports their products and will help me if i have any issues and I found a good deal so I will try them out. Wasn\'t happy with the walmart stuff.

 

Um...weren't you GeneralCustard yesterday? I've highlighted your unique syntax.

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I got several E-1 error messages and called Accu-Chek customer service on Saturday at 6:26 am and spoke with

a very helpful person. Evidently as a newbie I let the bottle sit next to an iMac that gets warm which caused the strips to fail.

When I tried a new batch all was well. Lesson learned. Keep in cool dry place cap closed.

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I started testing 5/23/13. So far am very pleased. My insurance provided the meter but the lacncing device, lancets, and control solution provided for free were off brand. Not Accu Check. Accu Chek has a unique lancing device and thats why i chose this system. I called support explained my problem and they replaced the insurance provided stuff with theirs FREE No questions asked. Arrived in 2 days. Also they have really good "how to " test videos for the newbie tester. I am an Accu Chek fan forever.

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There is a professional study that was done comparing 27 different meters for accuracy. You can find it here:

 

http://www.bionimeusa.com/files/journal_papers/IDT_Report.pdf

 

If you save it to your computer, then open it with Adobe Acrobat reader, scroll down to page 224 and rotate the page clockwise so you can read it more easily. According to this chart the 3 most accurate meters are the Accu-Chek AVIVA, Bionime Rightest GM101 and the FreeStyle Freedom (the older one, not the new Freedom Lite). The FreeStyle Lite did pretty good too, but not nearly as well as the first three, especially the AVIVA and Bionime. Rotate the page back to normal, and the next few pages show the individual results of each test for each meter with an average bias (meaning the average high or low of the correct readings) and the range of highs and lows (the tighter the range, the more overall accuracy).

 

As you can see, some are really accurate, and some are downright inaccurate.

 

Hopefully this will help in choosing the best meters. To help understand and interpret the results:

 

If you'll notice in the last column of the chart on page 224, the Accu-Chek AVIVA was the most accurate at BG levels above 75 mg/dl with 71% of test readings within +/- 5% of being exactly correct . The FreeStyle Freedom was 2nd at 69%. What this means is that if the true lab BG level tested was 100, then the AVIVA would read between 95 mg/dl and 105 mg/dl in 71 out of 100 tests. The other 29 tests would read either below 95 mg/dl or above 105 mg/dl---so there's almost a 3 out of 4 chance that the reading is within 5%---which is MUCH better than the +/- 20% required for a meter to be deemed sufficiently accurate according to the FDA.

 

The issue is much more complex than what is inferred here. A meters ability to be glucose D specific or non specific as well as the response to oxygen, hemocrat numbers can throw meter accuracy all over the map. That data is carefully hidden away/deleted on standard spec sheets. Yes I started on an accucheck avia and I liked it till I discovered it was a non specific glucose testing meter and would provide a totalized reading of all sugars floating through blood system. For me that meant a meter reading 2 hours after a meter could be 40 to 100 points too high. That turned out useless to me. Statements peddled in the press that all meters are the same is ludicrous.

 

Accuchek has never properly answered this issue to me, may have resolved this issue and as best as I know is still under impression that the stomach/intestine firewall is adequate.

 

Somebody wants to provide a meter review dealing with these other factors and listing meters by whether they are glucose D specific or non specific, I am all ears and would appreciate such a review.

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The issue is much more complex than what is inferred here. A meters ability to be glucose D specific or non specific as well as the response to oxygen, hemocrat numbers can throw meter accuracy all over the map. That data is carefully hidden away/deleted on standard spec sheets. Yes I started on an accucheck avia and I liked it till I discovered it was a non specific glucose testing meter and would provide a totalized reading of all sugars floating through blood system. For me that meant a meter reading 2 hours after a meter could be 40 to 100 points too high. That turned out useless to me. Statements peddled in the press that all meters are the same is ludicrous.

 

Accuchek has never properly answered this issue to me, may have resolved this issue and as best as I know is still under impression that the stomach/intestine firewall is adequate.

 

Somebody wants to provide a meter review dealing with these other factors and listing meters by whether they are glucose D specific or non specific, I am all ears and would appreciate such a review.

 

Could you define glucose D. Is that diabetic glucose or what. Thanks

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