notme

Low Carb Daily Diet.....

2,719 posts in this topic

I will try the avacados and nuts in replacement for the bread if I find that I spike.

 

I am also in the same boat Linda. I think I have paid so much attention to carbs, I forgot calories entirely. I would like to lose ten pounds before my son's wedding. Actually, I would LOVE to lose ten pounds.

 

Ok....so almonds, avacados and olives. I like all three.

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Low carb diets are tricky. I take the gylcemic index into consideration. I try to include a variety from the glycemic index value choices when I am planning my meals because the variation offers a balance for a longer digestion time. Since foods low in GI value last longer, I include 1 or more to hinder lows before next mealtime.

 

For example; Breakfast I ate 1 slice whole wheat toast (13 carbs, index = medium), two link turkey sausage (0 carbs + protein), 1/2 apple (carbs 13, index=Low) low-fat fruit Breyers light yogurt (carbs 12, index= low) and egg beaters (0 carbs).

 

Low Glycemic Diet from FIFTY 50

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OK... I know you have little respect for my opinion but for the sake of your Son's wedding I'll try this just once...

 

I also know you did not think this thread was about insulin but to me insulin=carbs=insulin=carbs... as a Type 1 D you should already recognise that intimate relationship... also as a Type 1 D you should recognise that lower amounts of insulin lead to fat burning -- rather than fat storage... exactly what happens with an untreated Type 1

 

So to burn (not store) excess fat you need to minimise insulin.

 

Low-carb is clearly the answer but you also seem to believe that fat is unhealthy BUT you don't want to starve... why should you?

 

Protein might provide part of the answer but a) you are vegetarian (?) and B) the liver converts protein to glucose over time which is likely to at least keep your basal needs up

 

I humbly suggest you embrace fat... it does not raise BG at all, if anything it will slow the release of sugar from any carbs you eat at the same time, it will fill you up quicker and for longer, and there really is no scientific evidence that it causes harm.

 

So have your yogurt but please make it full-fat, add more cheese (again full fat mature) to your eggs and possibly even a splash of full-cream, if you have the bread enjoy more than a glancing wave of real butter, avocados yes, nuts yes, olives yes! Heck even have some dark chocolate.

 

If you feel satisfied on the fats and minimise the carbs+insulin -- regardless of the calories -- I strongly suggest that you can lose that 10lbs for the wedding.

 

I have posted my own meal plan in other threads so won't shock everyone here with them again.

 

OK... I'm done in this thread.

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You've got me all wrong Frank. I have great respect for your opinion. I don't always agree with it or the way it is presented sometimes, but I definitely respect your opinion.

 

I think you might have misunderstood my response about insulin. What I meant to say was I don't want to limit this thread to only people who take insulin, I wanted type 2's on medication to respond as well. Perhaps I was unclear.

 

I don't specifically have a fear of fat, but I do know that I lost weight about two years ago before I went to Hawaii. I tried low carb/high protein (I wasn't veggie then) and I didn't lose a pound. It is true that I may have made some mistakes. Two months before my trip, I switched to low fat and I lost weight. I felt pretty good while I was in Hawaii and felt I looked ok. I came home and gained it all back.

 

It is hard to embrace fat when my doctor and cardiologist and nutritionist tell me I need to eat low fat. I find it really hard based on what I have read so far. I guess I trust my doctors more than I thought and I am still looking for the answers that best serve me. My Mother has also lost over 100 pounds eating low fat and lower carb. I am like everyone else on this site.....just looking for answers.

 

I am trying if you notice. I am trying to modify low carb and a healthy fat diet. It is the best my conscience will let me do so far.

 

I don't want just meal plans, but I would actually like to see a daily digest of what people are eating. Not only can we see the foods they eat, but eventually I am hoping to also see A1c results, lipids and weight loss information.

 

I don't know why you are done with that concept. I thought it was a pretty good one to get information.

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Nancy, I think it is fine to change incrementally!

 

I, personally, am "embracing the fat," as Frank suggests, though. Because otherwise I would get too hungry. I have begun backing off fat, a bit and gradually, now, since I see my doc in 2 weeks and do not him freaking out over my lipid panel, and in turn scaring me off low-carbing (and hence possibly onto insulin, and gaining weight, and getting discouraged, etc).

 

But if you do some poking around, there is plenty of research supporting low-carbing with high dietary fat ... even unto describing how lipids tend to go up before they do, indeed, come down, with low-carbing.

 

My concept of fat as bad is hard to kill, but I am trying to do it anyhow ... because the literature is out there, and because low-fat did not work for me, in the long run.

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Nancy, I think it is fine to change incrementally!

 

I, personally, am "embracing the fat," as Frank suggests, though. Because otherwise I would get too hungry. I have begun backing off fat, a bit and gradually, now, since I see my doc in 2 weeks and do not him freaking out over my lipid panel, and in turn scaring me off low-carbing (and hence possibly onto insulin, and gaining weight, and getting discouraged, etc).

 

But if you do some poking around, there is plenty of research supporting low-carbing with high dietary fat ... even unto describing how lipids tend to go up before they do, indeed, come down, with low-carbing.

 

My concept of fat as bad is hard to kill, but I am trying to do it anyhow ... because the literature is out there, and because low-fat did not work for me, in the long run.

 

I understand you completely. I just am not sure I am willing to bet my life on it yet. I have a Mom who had quadruple bypass and carotid endarterectomy and a stroke at 53. My grandmother died from stroke from carotid artery problems. My Mom's very well know cardiologist told her to CUT the fat. I am not sure I can embrace fat, based on my family history and his recommendations. I guess I need more time to research, but I would think that this cardiologist would have done enough of that for ten of my lifetimes. I am trying to embrace the "good" fat.

 

 

I do wonder though if you believe that what you eat doesn't effect your bloodwork. Why would you change what your doing before your blood test?

 

I swear, I am not being argumentative. I am trying to understand.

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breakfast -about 15 almonds and about 10 blueberries.

 

lunch, salad with cheese, cucumbers, scallions and sesame seeds/oil and vinegar. a little tuna

 

getting ready for dinner...brautwurst, onions peppers mushrooms on grill. cooked broccoli. coffee. mmmmmm!

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I do wonder though if you believe that what you eat doesn't effect your bloodwork. Why would you change what your doing before your blood test?

 

 

I swear, I am not being argumentative. I am trying to understand.

 

I am kinda "chicken," and hedging. I fully expect my diet to change my blood work and for this worse ... THIS time. But I have read clinical studies substantiating that if you stick with it, lipids do normalize.

 

If they are still bad at 6 months or a year, I would reconsider the fat content, but I want to give this diet a fair chance. Does that make more sense?

 

Not to mention ... I do think there are MDs who practice defensively and are thus obliged to mouth the words of the "official" guidelines, but also know there are other ways to get er done.

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I swear, I am not being argumentative. I am trying to understand.

 

Read "Good Calories Bad Calories" by Taubes and you will understand. Your Mom's Cardio could also use a copy.

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Breakfast today, an Atkins shake. Often, an omelette or a turkey sausage of some sort from Trader Joe's. Maybe a scant handful of walnuts or almonds.

 

Lunch today: half-square of unsweetened bakers chocoloate and an avocado and Canadian bacon omelette. The omelette comes with fried potatoes and a cup of cubed melon and pineapple; I ate three pieces of fried potato and three cubes of fruit (one pineapple, two cantaloupe).

 

Dinner: probably grilled chicken or fish over a salad of mixed greens, dressed with flavored olive oil. I'll probably add some almonds or walnuts, and a half-square of unsweetened baker's chocolate.

 

A couple of nights ago, we made ice cream with a pint of heavy cream, a cup of unsweetened almond milk, and some sugar-free vanilla syrup.

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Yes Linda, totally makes sense now.

IMG_3039-1.jpg

 

 

My lunch was a big salad including:

 

Romaine Lettuce

spinach

one egg

celery

3 baby carrots

4 tiny tomatoes

Feta cheese

facon bits (no meat)

1/4 cup ranch made with buttermilk

 

blood sugar 119 before lunch 129 twohours later. Admittedly, I took my insulin a bit late.

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Nancy,

 

Yummy! I love Feta cheese on spinach salads. Facon bits -- how funny; I've never seen them. I also like your placemats.

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It consists of 3 eggs, a handful of grated cheese, and 2-3 mushrooms chopped up. I mix the whole lot up, add some herbs, and cook it in the microwave.

 

Mark:

 

That sounds yummy. How long do you cook it for? I've never had much luck with microwaving eggs. What kind of container are you using?

 

Regards,

 

D

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Mark:

 

That sounds yummy. How long do you cook it for? I've never had much luck with microwaving eggs. What kind of container are you using?

 

Regards,

 

D

 

 

Gosh, I forgot about microwaving scrambled eggs. You can just use corning ware to micro eggs. Puffs them up and makes them look a lot bigger than they are.

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I have posted my own meal plan in other threads so won't shock everyone here with them again.

 

OK... I'm done in this thread.

 

Maybe you can direct us towards these threads where your typical daily or weekly meal plan is described, so we can all be "shocked" about it while this very practical and central information sharing about low carbing is going on.

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and yes, that would be a LOT of fruit carbs for ME, Nancy. (I mean in your first post!). and I woulda skipped the bread (again, for ME) in order to bank carbs for later ...

 

More "trying to understand" the low carb approaches here... PLEASE take the questions in good faith. We're chatting over a kitchen table. Really.

 

You say that would be a lot of carbs for you. Fair enough, but on what basis? Pure "amount", in and of itself (not related to spiking)? Or the GI factor of the carb, as far as it applies to you? Or the "type" of carbs? (Nutritional content, form of fructose, etc - but remember the spiking element is accounted for)

 

To make it complicated to understand the approach, you mention eating 80g of lentils in your meal plan and little spike. So if 80g of a fruit didn't spike you (no, I'm not saying there IS a fruit that wouldn't spike you, I'm saying "all cases are different" and the 80g lentils suggests you're ok with large amount of carbs that don't spike?) would you included that in your meal plan?

 

Yes, I know it could be all of the above or a mixture. I'm interested in what is really guiding you. To me, there's this two sided thing that goes on in the "low carb camp", some embrace GI and accept a certain percentage of carbs if they don't spike. Others make a hex sign at pretty much any carb and disparage the use of the idea of investigating the rankability of carbs. "If you're going to eat poison now and then, who cares what poison?" Is the kind of impression that comes across.

 

Yes? No? Does this reflect your belief or not? Linda, or others. And most importantly, in exactly what way it is informing these meal decisions. I'm not trying to typify or group people together. I'm trying to see if I can understand your own particular belief a bit more, or a range of beliefs. The low carb thing can seem very veiled because... for some reason, the people who do usually contribute to this information here is usually very small, and very particular. I rejoice at the low carb meals plans and approaches that have been posted. I wish more people chimed in more often with such great info.

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As Jan says... well, one snack at a time sure is going to be lots of posts and hard to read through, especially if there's lots of "bloggy" elements of what you don't eat etc. But nevermind, it was just my thoughts, and I'm hardly stopping you, just requesting more to the point information, take it or leave it. I'm hoping for MORE information from you, not less. I don't understand your comment about going away!

 

this is my fault. i had combined two threads in my head. i went and bought my lunch and bought a bag of roasted peanuts in their shells AND a fresh Fuji apple. my idea was to have one/other/both for afternoon snack if i got hungry.

 

that is how i do Low Carb. It depends on my BGL - see?

 

as it turned out my bgl at snack time (4PM ish and 3 hours after lunch) was higher than i expected (7.6 (136)). so i could have had some insulin (say 4u for me) and the apple. BUT i decided to have NO exogenous insulin and a handful of peanuts in their shells and a cup of Twinings Russian Caravan Tea instead.

 

as it turned out i was down to 6.9 (124) at 7.30PM - just before dinner

 

:)

 

-- Joel.

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Hi Nancy,

 

I sort of mix up what I have from day to day depending on how much physical activity I'm going to do and what sort of BGLs I'm getting.

I try not to eat a lot of carbs (not by choice!) because that = less insulin, which in turn = less allergy for me!

 

So breakfast is usually some combination of eggs - scrambled or omelette with bacon or ham / mushrooms and tea or coffee.

 

Morning tea - I usually skip eating and just have a cup of tea.

 

Lunch is any combination of salad greens , cucubmber, cabbage, beetroot, with cheese or tuna or chicken.

 

Afternoon tea: mixed nuts / celery sticks with peanut butter / or a plain biscuit with a cup of tea or a couple of bits of sugar free chocolate.

 

Dinner: Grilled or oven roasted meat (lamb / pork / chicken / fish / beef) with any combination of salad or mixed steamed vegetables.

Occassionally we may have a bit of potato or pasta on the side (small portion).

 

I love bread, but it absolutely bites my BGLs :( so this is a luxury food.

 

Oh and I favour a balsamic vinegarette dressing on my salads.

 

Dessert: Low Joule (diabetic friendly) jelly with a scoop of low sugar (diabetic friendly) vanilla ice cream.

 

I am currently working on a recipe for a "sugarless" meringue base for the popular Aussie dessert "Pavlova". I'm still tweaking the eggwhite / splenda ratios and oven temperature and cooking time. This is typically served with whipped cream (sweetened with Vanilla Essence and splenda) and topped with strawberries, kiwi fruit and passionfruit pulp - YUM!!!

This is one of my favourite "daibetic friendly" and low carb desserts - I would be happy to share this recipe with you once I've mastered it ;)

 

PS Great thread Nancy - it's really interesting to read what others are eating and compare notes :D

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Dinner: probably grilled chicken or fish over a salad of mixed greens, dressed with flavored olive oil. I'll probably add some almonds or walnuts, and a half-square of unsweetened baker's chocolate.

 

And that's what I had for dinner: grilled tuna over mixed greens and roasted pepper-infused olive oil. I had a handful of walnuts, a 1/2 square of baking chocolate, and some pork rinds, as well. BG before dinner was 92; two and a quarter hours (and a half hour on the execise bike) later, BG was 94.

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Late breakfast/brunch: 4-8 bacons, half a muffin, coffee.

Afternoon snack: Usually cashews, often a tuna sandwich on low carb bread, or grilled cheese.

Dinner: Usually either extra lean hamburger, tuna, chicken, hotdogs, or ham, with green beans.

While I've never avoided Fats in my foods, I don't seek them out.

Am I a low carber? I think I am, but I also feel the excercise a person gets is VERY IMPORTANT. If I'm going out to cut trees for firewood, I will stop for a burger and fries knowing I will expend a lot of energy.

I'm not into what fats do, as opposed to carbs, I just know what works for me and eat accordingly.

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I'm enjoying reading this thread as I was curious to see what people are eating for low carb daily dieting. I'm trying my best to practice this as well but being (chinese) asian, our diet here is pre-dominately high carb, high cholesterol, etc...just so unhealthy. So I really have to prepare my meals in advance.

 

Breakfast: 2 x hard boiled eggs or omelette/2 x sausages and a chinese sized bowl of mixed beans (pre-packed carrots, corns & green beans)

 

Lunch: salad with the lowest carb content of thousand island dressing I can find. sometimes it's just 2 or 3 types of stir fry vegetables and a portion of chicken/pork. absolutely no rice whatsoever

 

Dinner: brown rice (less than a chinese bowl sized), at least 2 types of stir fry vegetables, stir fry or steamed chicken/fish/pork & a bowl of soup

 

Snacks: Nuts throughout the day and japanese green tea

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My basic menus are as follows. I have decreased my A1c from 7.8 to 5.9 by following this:

Breakfast

2 egg omelette with any 2 of mushrooms/spinach/bacon, or

berry smoothie with protein powder,

or scrambled eggs and bacon, or

flaxmeal muffin

 

Lunch

usually 2 chicken drumsticks with lots of leafy green salad, or

canned salmon and salad, or

omelette if I havent had eggs for breakfast, or

pysllium husk pancakes

 

Dinner

stirfry with lots of green leafy asian vegetables. I make my own garlic sauce or use a very low carb black bean sauce from the supermarket, or

roast with no potatoes, or

herbed chicken breasts with sauted green veges, or

curry with no rice (the family get rice with theirs), or

steak/chops with veges

as side dishes I make cheesy cauliflower, or cauli rice or just saute up a whole heap of green veges.

 

Snacks

cream cheese and diet jelly whipped together

chocolate/coconut pudding made with coconut milk and psyllium husks

almonds

almond meal crackers

peanuts (not too many of these)

pork rinds

 

I mainly cook with olive oil or coconut oil

 

The only fruit I have is in the berry smoothie (about 3/4 cup), which I usually have on work mornings.

 

Hope this helps.

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...I just am not sure I am willing to bet my life on it yet. I have a Mom who had quadruple bypass and carotid endarterectomy and a stroke at 53. My grandmother died from stroke from carotid artery problems. My Mom's very well know cardiologist told her to CUT the fat. I am not sure I can embrace fat, based on my family history and his recommendations. I guess I need more time to research, but I would think that this cardiologist would have done enough of that for ten of my lifetimes. I am trying to embrace the "good" fat...

 

Just a thing:

 

Promote Heart Health

 

Avocados contain oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that may help to lower cholesterol. In one study of people with moderately high cholesterol levels, individuals who ate a diet high in avocados showed clear health improvements. After seven days on the diet that included avocados, they had significant decreases in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, along with an 11% increase in health promoting HDL cholesterol...

 

(link)

 

Now, off to whip up a basic omelet for breakfast.

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