notme

Low Carb Daily Diet.....

2,719 posts in this topic

Great thread Nancy!

 

Typical day for me:

 

Breakfast:

what's breakfast?!? I generally don't eat breakfast, I never have. Altough I will admit when I eat a small breakfast that I do lose weight easier.

 

Mid-morning:

I have a Latte, it's my daily treat.

 

Lunch:

I have two small slices of wholemeal bread with butter or a butter based dairy spread. Sometimes I'll add some bacon or sausages.

 

Dinner:

Varies alot. More often it's chicken but occassionally it's pork/beef (when family agrees). Stir-frys, spicy food, plenty of garlic, vegetables. Fajittas once a week with low carb wraps.

 

Night time snack

Cheese/nuts/ham. Occassional plain cookie.

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I do not take insulin to manage my diabetes but am on medication. When initially diagnosed I went through training which included diet management. At that time I was given a food list and told to eat 2-3 carbs a day at each main meal and 1 carb at each of 2 snacks. When I did this consistently I lost weight and my blood sugar stayed within my target range. However, since that time (about 2 years ago), I have become less diligent. I am not eating my 2 snacks daily and am not real consistent with staying within my 2-3 carbs. Not unexpectedly, my blood sugar levels have been slightly higher than I would wish. I will monitor this thread for additional ideas that will help me stay on track. Thanks for starting the thread.

Theresa Newell

Conquering Diabetes

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Today was greek yogurt again (love the stuff) and berries with one piece of low flour toast and sorry to say butter waved over it again. :o Hard to break old habits.

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I had scrambled eggs again this morning (no bacon), with a few pieces of cantaloupe and Diet Mtn Dew (not a coffee drinker).

 

Lunch was a salad, bascially field greens, cucumbers and almonds with balsamic vinaigarette dressing and a few pieces of pepperoni pulled off a pizza that we had for lunch at work today.

 

I was hungry just a few minutes ago, so I had one of my protein drinks, as it will be awhile until dinner.

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At 6 this morning, I had an Atkins shake; at 10, I had a single-serving packet of walnut halves and pieces from Trader Joe's (couldn't make the 6 hours to lunch without something). Lunch was a Cobb salad, dressed with olive oil.

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These are some of the things that I usually eat on a daily basis. I tend to be a creaure of habit so it usually never varies (except maybe on the weekends):

 

Breakfast:

1/2C of 57% fiber one cereal

110z low carb protein drink (I pour the drink over the cereal)

eggs w/cheese (usually on weekends)

My bs is usually between 85-100 in the am.

If I check my bs after breakfast (which I only do if I am trying something new) it usually only goes up a couple of points.

 

Lunch:

low carb protein drink

2 small cucumbers w/ ranch dressing (full fat)

SF jello

String cheese

 

Dinner:

beef/pork/chicken/ fish/hamburgers w/ no bun (what ever we are in the mood for)

low carb pizza. I take a low carb tortilla, about 1tbsp of sauce, add cheese, pepperoni,etc and bake in the oven.

veggies (usually 2 servings)

salad with almonds, feta cheese, dressing.

My highest bs readings of the day come before dinner (ranges between 90-105). This is mainly because I workout after work and before dinner.

 

Snacks:

raw almonds

cheese

lunchmeat

SF jello

SF gum ( if I feel a little hungry I chew a piece and am good to go)

Although I am not a big snacker, I have to eat something before I go to bed (about 2 hours after dinner). My bs usually bottoms out before I go to bed (my dr says it's because I exercise before dinner). It will usually range from 55-70 (although I never feel a hypo). If I don't eat anything I will wake up the next morning with it a little on the high side (for me anyway).

 

I usually only drink water or Crystal Light and tea if I am out. I don't like coffee and I try to stay away from caffeine.

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This is really interesting to me. Thank you EVERYONE for posting. What I am discovering is many people who are low carbing are also eating low calorie and pretty much healthy fats.

 

Today for lunch I had fresh green beans

 

(with a tsp butter and tiny bit of garlic salt) not a garlic fan as I have stated.

 

6 baby carrots

 

1 piece of Laughing cow cheese

 

hard boiled egg (yes another egg)

 

My blood sugar was 90 before lunch and 54 about 2.5 hours later. I just ate a small peach.

 

 

I really am enjoying this thread and learning a lot.

 

Oh.... I went to Whole Foods and they have a trail mix bar. I made my personal trail mix of

 

Base was large flake coconut

raw sunflower seads

raw almonds

raw peanuts

a tiny 1/2 scoop of sesame seed sticks

a tiny 1/2 scoop o salted baked peanuts for some salty flavor.

 

Really really really good. Not expensive at all because they weigh it by the pound and the majority was made up with coconut.

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I may finally have my husband on board! (he is obese and at MINIMUM, pre-d, but won't admit it).

 

I had a lovely picnic lunch of curried egg salad and curtido (a slaw with mostly-vinegar dressing) in a low carb tortilla, faux potato salad (cauliflower), and some feta and greek olives. A lot? Yes, but it was good stuff ...

 

Dinner was a mixed-greens salad with 1/4 tomato, 1/2 carrot shredded, 2 TBS chopped walnuts, and a portion of baked flavored tofu on top, with sun-dried tomato (commercial) dressing. I am really growing to LOVE salads!

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late breakfast today. black coffee. one piece of burgens wholemeal and seeds toast (8.5 g carbs) with crunchy pb.

 

woke up with a fbg of 9.0 (162). had 8u of nr. this should balance me out at 4.0-5.0 (72-90) or so...

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I may finally have my husband on board! (he is obese and at MINIMUM, pre-d, but won't admit it).

 

I had a lovely picnic lunch of curried egg salad and curtido (a slaw with mostly-vinegar dressing) in a low carb tortilla, faux potato salad (cauliflower), and some feta and greek olives. A lot? Yes, but it was good stuff ...

 

Dinner was a mixed-greens salad with 1/4 tomato, 1/2 carrot shredded, 2 TBS chopped walnuts, and a portion of baked flavored tofu on top, with sun-dried tomato (commercial) dressing. I am really growing to LOVE salads!

 

That sounds nice. No 80g meals today? Is that a regular occurrence? I did ask a while back, if you could explain HOW you are coming to those carb decisions, if they are a part of your normal meal plans. "How" your brand of low carbing works, is what I'm trying to work out. To me it seems almost low-moderate carb low GI on some days. I don't really care what it's called, I just want to understand the process. So, in the event you missed it - just asking again. :) Here's the post with the actual question. http://www.diabetesforums.com/forum/dieting/39716-low-carb-daily-diet-3.html#post457311

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Nancy

One thing I noticed.. although I do not restrict nor am in the least afraid of fat (though to be fair, I seem to have a genetic pre-disposition to low cholesterol) after 5 yrs of most low and sometimes moderate carb with the odd mad carb up to prevent psychosis— I do not eat large amounts of fat or protein per meal..in fact after reading what people eat and watching the less pancreatically challenged, I realise i eat somewhat modestly, except for large wads of cooked greens.

When I started LC I ate half a cow at a time and blocks of cheese and chug a lugged cream.... I was a Desperate Dan of the diabetic world... now I eat smaller portions of protein and feel pretty satisfied with them, but if I am still hungry after a meal I will ALWAYS add an ounce of cheese or a bite of meat..even tho what I really want is a carby whatnot..

 

Can you get sugarfree syrup out your way? A great BF is a couple of spoons of ricotta with an egg beaten in . 2 tbs of flax meal or ground walnuts micro 2 mins break up wit a fork and add cream or milk and sf syrup.. just like oatmeal..only better..

I also like the kraft extra cheddar slices micro for 2 mins for 2 on parchment and can either eat as a snack or use as 'bread' for a salad sandwich.. a lot of the fat melts off and it is only about an ounce per slice anyway..

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Nancy

One thing I noticed.. although I do not restrict nor am in the least afraid of fat (though to be fair, I seem to have a genetic pre-disposition to low cholesterol) after 5 yrs of most low and sometimes moderate carb with the odd mad carb up to prevent psychosis— I do not eat large amounts of fat or protein per meal..in fact after reading what people eat and watching the less pancreatically challenged, I realise i eat somewhat modestly, except for large wads of cooked greens.

When I started LC I ate half a cow at a time and blocks of cheese and chug a lugged cream.... I was a Desperate Dan of the diabetic world... now I eat smaller portions of protein and feel pretty satisfied with them, but if I am still hungry after a meal I will ALWAYS add an ounce of cheese or a bite of meat..even tho what I really want is a carby whatnot..

 

Can you get sugarfree syrup out your way? A great BF is a couple of spoons of ricotta with an egg beaten in . 2 tbs of flax meal or ground walnuts micro 2 mins break up wit a fork and add cream or milk and sf syrup.. just like oatmeal..only better..

I also like the kraft extra cheddar slices micro for 2 mins for 2 on parchment and can either eat as a snack or use as 'bread' for a salad sandwich.. a lot of the fat melts off and it is only about an ounce per slice anyway..

 

 

 

Thank you soso, I can get s/f syrup and it is a very good one. I will try your "oatmeal". Sounds interesting.

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More "trying to understand" the low carb approaches here... PLEASE take the questions in good faith. We're chatting over a kitchen table. Really.

 

You say that would be a lot of carbs for you. Fair enough, but on what basis? Pure "amount", in and of itself (not related to spiking)? Or the GI factor of the carb, as far as it applies to you? Or the "type" of carbs? (Nutritional content, form of fructose, etc - but remember the spiking element is accounted for)

 

To make it complicated to understand the approach, you mention eating 80g of lentils in your meal plan and little spike. So if 80g of a fruit didn't spike you (no, I'm not saying there IS a fruit that wouldn't spike you, I'm saying "all cases are different" and the 80g lentils suggests you're ok with large amount of carbs that don't spike?) would you included that in your meal plan?

 

Yes, I know it could be all of the above or a mixture. I'm interested in what is really guiding you. To me, there's this two sided thing that goes on in the "low carb camp", some embrace GI and accept a certain percentage of carbs if they don't spike. Others make a hex sign at pretty much any carb and disparage the use of the idea of investigating the rankability of carbs. "If you're going to eat poison now and then, who cares what poison?" Is the kind of impression that comes across.

 

Yes? No? Does this reflect your belief or not? Linda, or others. And most importantly, in exactly what way it is informing these meal decisions. I'm not trying to typify or group people together. I'm trying to see if I can understand your own particular belief a bit more, or a range of beliefs. The low carb thing can seem very veiled because... for some reason, the people who do usually contribute to this information here is usually very small, and very particular. I rejoice at the low carb meals plans and approaches that have been posted. I wish more people chimed in more often with such great info.

 

OH ... I DID miss this, Subby, sorry -- I meant 80 g of lentil salad -- not 80 CARB g of them. OMG NO. I would have been hospitalized if I did that!

 

So it was, like, 1/2 cup or less serving. Which is a "normal" (volume) serving of a starch, really. It is only supposed to have about 10 g of carbs! I have had bad luck with legumes spiking me (even Chana dal, yes) -- this is the first time I have eaten them successfully, besides my 1/2 c. canned black beans made into an impromptu "soup." Probably practice, and learning to plan meals for total carb grams, has gotten me around to where I can. I am really seeing NO increased tolerance for carbs, yet ... but I have not lost that much weight, either (but not all that much to lose).

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Just to add for those with a sweet tooth -- I mixed chocolate whey powder, low-fat soy milk, 2T Hershey's SF chocolate, and 2T cream with ice cubes to make a post-exercise shake.

 

It tasted REMARKABLY like a McD shake!, oh MY!

 

Would not do it regularly, since the fat would slow amino acid absorption, but what a great TREAT! :D

 

(DH brought home a QUART of whipping cream and the syrup, to make his egg creams. He used to use milk or (GASP! sweetened condensed milk). He has always had these late at night, "sneaking," ... now I am encouraging him since they could head off carb cravings!)

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Thanks Linda. I love it when I can get solutions to mysteries cleared up so completely! First Joel and his uneaten apple, now you and your big now small now lentils ;) Hardly a mistake of yours, I guess I just fell into the habit of seeing the gs as carb gs from the other posts.

 

I too, would find a lot of lentils a big proposition to deal with successfully - as far as a sensible approach to insulin goes. As well as being a bit of a wild card factor food for me, I would need a slow release bolus on my pump - out of luck with injections. Chana Dal is not the wonder food for me it appears to be for Mendosa and some of the people posting on that site, either. But I do enjoy it and consider it a good food! Just need to be careful with bigger servings to get the right insulin dynamic happening.

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Chana Dal is not the wonder food for me it appears to be for Mendosa and some of the people posting on that site, either. But I do enjoy it and consider it a good food! Just need to be careful with bigger servings to get the right insulin dynamic happening.

 

Yes, the (maybe, for me) low GI confounds the issue ... I have NO IDEA when I would actually peak with them. And of course a really, really good mess of Chana Dal ... portion control most certainly becomes an issue for me. AND I must choose between them and the traditionally-accompanying rice. URGH.

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I still would like to have more discussions or info sharing about the low GI or spikability aspects of the carbs that even low-carbers do eat, and specific examples. It seems clear from this thread that carbs are still a substantial part of many people's low carb diets - and that decisions are being made, sensible decisions, based on a number of factors. Those interesting decisions tend to get a bit lost in low carb discussions on the board on general. Either simplified, or dismissed, or the whole carb thing just become hotly contested again and takes over.

 

I was thinking of the guy who mentioned carbing a bit up when doing intense exercise, because the exercise will cope with it. Well, an injector may well still go quite high if it's high GI carb and they don't get the injection just right for the carb, and the oncoming exercise. Why am I saying this? Just thinking aloud, really, and questioning the idea that "universal" and "common" approaches and tactics, like low carb and low GI, can be applied in broad one-way brushstrokes as they sometimes are.

 

Consider if I was to low carb without considering GI - even 50g in a day of the wrong carbs could send me high and keep me there for at least half a day. In that scenario being low carb is just half of the picture, for ANY kind of success, given my body at least. Often on this thread I see low carbers eat things I know would throw me out - and I mean ketosis levels - for hours! I assume if I wasn't insulin dependent, that might not be the case.

 

So I'm thinking, if you've got your natural system somewhat working for you, it may be that the type of small amount carb you throw at it is not quite so important, as when you have to cater for every gram suitably with the right amount of insulin. As in, if you are a diet driven type 2, high GI will be a higher spike and a major factor- but if you have no pancreas ability at all, high GI may outrun even what you thought was an appropriate bolus, and lead to extremely excessive highs for many hours. Being an even more major factor.

 

So that's not trying to claim this or that for this or that type, just been thinking about how different situations call for different emphasis on things. Trying to shake these things out in my head.

 

Anyway, that's not a discussion for here, I'm enjoying the refreshing information and simplicity of looking at people's diets!

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Chana dal is a relative of a chickpea which is harvested younger and thus is lower-glycemic index than regular chickpeas. For some people. It is popular in South Indian and Bengali cuisine (I have a collection of Bengali cookbooks, purportedly b/c my daughter is Bengali but she could care less. I just love the food!). It used to make what would be called in British, er, cuisine ;) , a spicy and tasty pease porridge.

 

David Mendosa's website has info on it.

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Chana dal is a relative of a chickpea which is harvested younger and thus is lower-glycemic index than regular chickpeas. For some people. It is popular in South Indian and Bengali cuisine (I have a collection of Bengali cookbooks, purportedly b/c my daughter is Bengali but she could care less. I just love the food!). It used to make what would be called in British, er, cuisine ;) , a spicy and tasty pease porridge.

 

David Mendosa's website has info on it.

 

 

Thanks Linda, I am not a great fan of Indian food, so that is probably why I was clueless about Chana Dal.

 

So...... What did everyone eat today?

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Ok, I'll bite. What is Chana Dal? I assume it isn't a child's toy? :D

 

No, but it's a great name for one. :)

 

It's a strain of indian chickpea that was found to have a very low GI rating when tested (something like 11, or 20, or something). If you google it you'll find info on Mendosa's site, including testimonials etc. I like that site, and I don't think it's a "crock" as such. But GI as a concept of measured spikability is something that while I think REALLY important in my food choices, has certain practical limits. If you're an injector, a big practical one is of course, spiking differently to the action of your insulin (for a non injector, I would have thought it would be always a nice thing to "eek" the energy from a carb out more slowly to let the pancreas cope, but anyway).

 

Not to mention there's no guarantee that the reported level of GI going to apply to you! It's just a means test of a number of people, often not many, at that.

 

Edit. Slow as always. Oh well.

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I still would like to have more discussions or info sharing about the low GI or spikability aspects of the carbs that even low-carbers do eat, and specific examples. It seems clear from this thread that carbs are still a substantial part of many people's low carb diets - and that decisions are being made, sensible decisions, based on a number of factors. Those interesting decisions tend to get a bit lost in low carb discussions on the board on general. Either simplified, or dismissed, or the whole carb thing just become hotly contested again and takes over.

 

I was thinking of the guy who mentioned carbing a bit up when doing intense exercise, because the exercise will cope with it. Well, an injector may well still go quite high if it's high GI carb and they don't get the injection just right for the carb, and the oncoming exercise. Why am I saying this? Just thinking aloud, really, and questioning the idea that "universal" and "common" approaches and tactics, like low carb and low GI, can be applied in broad one-way brushstrokes as they sometimes are.

 

Consider if I was to low carb without considering GI - even 50g in a day of the wrong carbs could send me high and keep me there for at least half a day. In that scenario being low carb is just half of the picture, for ANY kind of success, given my body at least. Often on this thread I see low carbers eat things I know would throw me out for hours! I assume if I wasn't insulin dependent, that might not be the case.

 

So I'm thinking, if you've got your natural system somewhat working for you, it may be that the type of small amount carb you throw at it is not quite so important, as when you have to cater for every gram suitably with the right amount of insulin. As in, if you are a diet driven type 2, high GI will be a higher spike and a major factor- but if you have no pancreas ability at all, high GI may outrun even what you thought was an appropriate bolus, and lead to extremely excessive highs for many hours. Being an even more major factor.

 

So that's not trying to claim this or that for this or that type, just been thinking about how different situations call for different emphasis on things. Trying to shake these things out in my head.

 

Anyway, that's not a discussion for here, I'm enjoying the refreshing information and simplicity of looking at people's diets!

 

I completely agree -- controlling blood sugars is about like driving with drunk goggles on. It is a good thing many people find reliable favorites and repeat them most of the time. I have yet to venture into a restaurant for that very reason.

 

I have decreased my "experimental" meals for the same reason, too. And yet, sometimes still, my BS is unpredictable as all get out.

 

And I am not sure your insulin dependence is much different from my situation ... but then I have no idea how long I will be able to go without, still ...

 

I now have this bizarre cycling of going from running in the 80's and 90's fastings, to 110's fastings. And there is NOTHING (including menstrual cycle) I can attribute the cyclicity to.

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I completely agree -- controlling blood sugars is about like driving with drunk goggles on.

 

Not a bad analogy.

 

And I am not sure your insulin dependence is much different from my situation ... but then I have no idea how long I will be able to go without, still ...

 

Yep, and I wasn't focusing on the differences, but there is a big problem of what do our words mean. The word "going high" is so specific to us all.

 

When I was thinking of the wrong say 30g of a high GI carb sending me high, given a bolus that just doesn't get there in time compared to the spike, I'm talking about going from 6 mmol/l (108) to 14 mmol/l (250) in 1 hour, to 17 mmol/l (306) in 3 hours and going up up up up, and no active force to bring it back down as it may indeed escalate to DKA - except, being aware of it and bashing it back down with insulin. That's my body.

 

Is it the same without insulin? Well, I guess it might be? Everyone's situation is different of course, and it seems to me that type 2s situation also changes and they need to keep up. Infinite variation. Just trying to get to some common mechanical differences between sets of people, and NOT actually just restricted to T1 / T2 fuzzy delineation, even in the t1 camp the way the body uses insulin can vary wildly.

 

I now have this bizarre cycling of going from running in the 80's and 90's fastings, to 110's fastings. And there is NOTHING (including menstrual cycle) I can attribute the cyclicity to.

 

My IR seems to work similarly. Given the same basal rate, those differences are actually quite mild for me - and that's on periods of low carbs, low GI carbs or low spiking carbs, as long as they are successfully bolused for - I have similar variation (scale is a bit different).

 

Have you considered fully basal testing? I've always thought it was worth considering for a t2 with that kind of variability.

 

Sorry for the rather OT nature of this post and discussion. PLEASE keep the meals rolling, people!

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PLEASE keep the meals rolling, people!

 

I will start then. I woke up this morning at 80. I found a 2% Fage greek yogurt at Whole Foods yesterday and bought a small container to try it. Fat was 4g instead of 23g! Huge difference, yet the carbohydrate was 8g vs 7g. I ate the entire thing which was about a cup with berries.

 

1 piece of toasted sprouted flourless bread with a bit more butter (1/2 tbs)since I cut back on the fat in the yogurt.

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I will start then. I woke up this morning at 80. I found a 2% Fage greek yogurt at Whole Foods yesterday and bought a small container to try it. Fat was 4g instead of 23g! Huge difference, yet the carbohydrate was 8g vs 7g. I ate the entire thing which was about a cup with berries.

 

1 piece of toasted sprouted flourless bread with a bit more butter (1/2 tbs)since I cut back on the fat in the yogurt.

 

Don't you love it when you can cut all that fat (calories) and only have one more carb gram?! Those things really excite me.

 

I did notice one thing Nancy -- don't hurt me!! Why did you add the butter to the toast? I know low-carbers eat more fat, but you and I both lean toward moderation. In my case that means no fat unless it replaces sugar. I just know how badly you want to lose that 10 pounds ;)

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