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lorkatz2004

difference between humalog and novolog

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I was shown how to use novolog yesterday, but I noticed a lot of people are on humalog. Does anyone know what is the difference between these 2 insulins?

 

My endo tells me I am insulin deficient and insulin sensitive and I now have to go on multiple injections during the day. I have thyroid disease, but because I do not have any gads antibodies, he classifies me as a Type 2 insulin deficient diabetic, but saids he needs to treat me as a Type 1.5.

 

I was given 15/1 carb ratio to start.........and to tell the truth, I am nervous about this. Any advice, please?

 

Thanks

Cathy

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Novalog and Humulog are both rapid acting insulin analogs.

They are intended to do the same thing but are made by two different manufacturers. Some folks report differences in how they respond to each. So if one is not working the way you want you might try the other.

No surprise that you are nervous. Don't worry. You'll get used to it.

Advise? Stick around, learn all you can. This is no cookie cutter condition. We are all a little different. Your Dr. and others can advise but won't ever know as much as you do about you. You have to take responsability for your treatment.

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I'd second what Tommy says about the two insulins. I'm someone who finds somewhat different results from Novo and Huma, but I understand for many there is unlikely to be much difference.

 

I obviously can't be sure, but your doctor sounds to me like he is on the ball and progressive: a good thing. About the I:C ratio, treat it like a ballpark number and be ready to observe the results and adapt it to your body (and even different times of the day).

 

Bear in mind that unless your basal dose is correct and keeping you even, it may not be possible to troubleshoot your I:C and boluses to find much improvement.

 

I highly recommend the book Using Insulin, or if you think there might be a pump in your future (or want to consider it) Pumping Insulin, by John Walsh.

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An I:C of 15 is pretty much the starting point for an adult diabetic and you adapt it from there. For what it is worth I am in the same boat as you; insulin deficient and insulin sensitive but no antibodies.

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I've recently switched to Novalog now I'm pumping after >8 years on Humalog (MDI). I find that the Novalog has a slightly longer activity profile for me and this helps my BG control a bit.

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My basal insulin, lantus, has been keeping me high, from what the endo tells me. It is around 200 when I wake.........he tells me I am missing a piece of the puzzle, the bolus. I only take 10U of the lantus at night........when I am more comfortable with the bolus, I will try to start to tweek it.

 

I just got the prescription today and will start today.....it made me even more nervous when the pharmist came over and wanted to make sure I understood the directions.

 

thanks so much for your replies and help

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Yep, I second everyone else in saying that Humalog and Novolog are just made by different companies. I've used them both...they seem to work the same on me.

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I just got the prescription today and will start today.....it made me even more nervous when the pharmist came over and wanted to make sure I understood the directions.

 

Hi LorKatz...consider your hand held! I laugh about it now, but I was literally shaking the first time I had to figure out how much Novolog to take and just when and where to inject. I felt as though I'd make some horrible mistake and (believe it or not) accidentally kill myself. Now, of course, I could do it with my eyes closed. Hmmmm, maybe not.....:T

 

Good luck with your Novolog. I'm sure you'll enjoy the improved control.

 

Jen

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Now, of course, I could do it with my eyes closed. Hmmmm, maybe not.....:T

 

Jen

 

Yeah... tried that a time or two.... all I got was another opportunity to check my BG :D

 

On NovoLog vs. Humalog, I recently switched from NovoLog to Humalog. What a difference for me! -- I found the Novolog to be very "peaky" and "late" causing me to crash HARD about two hours PP

 

... but as many have noted: it's a custom fit around here, so your results may vary, and past performance is no indication of future trends! (I think I'll add that last line to my sig...)

 

Well wishes and good luck!

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one thing throwing me off is that the nurse would only give me 5 test strips per day...........I would need one before, then 2 hours afterwards to see where I am at. The nurse said you don't need one afterwards, if you are going low your body will tell you, then correct or eat??

 

I thought i would need about a minimum of 7 strips per day............but she gave me one for the morning, one for lunch, one for supper, and one for bedtime......and one for emergency use.

 

How do I know if I am using the right amount of novolog if I can't test afterwards to see how it is affecting me?

 

thanks

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Grrrr... is this nurse from the stone ages or what? "You body will tell you"... meaning wait for a hypo to come and whack you over the head, then scramble to safety, most likely going high in the process. Then not having strips to check after trying to correct. "One for emergency use"? That is surely a joke. This is all entirely not good enough for starting out on intensive insulin therapy.

 

I suggest you do what you can to bypass this nurse and gain access to an adequate amount of strips. See an endo and explain your situation, if needs be.

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one thing throwing me off is that the nurse would only give me 5 test strips per day...........I would need one before, then 2 hours afterwards to see where I am at. The nurse said you don't need one afterwards, if you are going low your body will tell you, then correct or eat??

 

I thought i would need about a minimum of 7 strips per day............but she gave me one for the morning, one for lunch, one for supper, and one for bedtime......and one for emergency use.

 

How do I know if I am using the right amount of novolog if I can't test afterwards to see how it is affecting me?

 

thanks

 

The nurse should have her license revoked.

Unless you are VERY experienced and condident that you can feel both lows and highs then you need to test before and two hours after eating. Since most folks eat 3 times a day and like to get a fasting test when they wake up that makes 7 times minimum. More if you eat at other times, have highs or lows or operate machinery (say perhaps a car or bycycle).

 

If my nurse pulled that on me I'd take it to the Dr. If the Dr. didn't back me up I'd fire his rear end and look for one who has a clue.

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Yeah, that nurse could be putting a lot of patients (and you!) in unhealthy / dangerous situations.

 

Good thing you noticed - now you need to take some action!

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