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djt1344

Does drinking more water help overall??

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Hi Gang,

 

Was wondering if drinking a bit more water helps with T2, I have been drinking more tea from time I started to take D seriously with my meds. In other post I used to punish my body (denial stage) by consuming 2 liter sodas everyday for 2 years and nearly had a heart attack as a result. For the past 3 months I have had not even a diet soda nor does my mouth have a craving anymore but have been drinking tea like 5-6 times a day until today when I drank less than a cup. Overall, I have not drank anything consistently which is getting me concerned and want to force myself to drink at least 6 cups of water a day.

 

My question to you guys is that will drinking water (warm) will help both get rid of all the daily D pills I have in my system and will it help my overall being, I know this might be a dumb question.

 

Daniel:

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Hello again Daniel :D, Water is the most that you should drink with the exercise as this will balance the amount of glucose that you have in your body and it will serve your kidneys better service. also as you sweat in exercise will push the salts too so the little bottle should have a tiny weeny bit of salt or other electrolyte to top up the salts although the amount of salts that you eat should be enough anyway. ;):D

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Water: How much should you drink every day? - MayoClinic.com

 

 

 

Water: How much should you drink every day?

Water is essential to good health, yet needs vary by individual. These guidelines can help ensure you drink enough fluids.

By Mayo Clinic staff

 

How much water should you drink each day? A simple question with no easy answers. Studies have produced varying recommendations over the years, but in truth, your water needs depend on many factors, including your health, how active you are and where you live.

 

Though no single formula fits everyone, knowing more about your body's need for fluids will help you estimate how much water to drink each day.

 

Health benefits of water

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Functions of water in the body

Water is your body's principal chemical component, making up, on average, 60 percent of your body weight. Every system in your body depends on water. For example, water flushes toxins out of vital organs, carries nutrients to your cells and provides a moist environment for ear, nose and throat tissues.

 

Lack of water can lead to dehydration, a condition that occurs when you don't have enough water in your body to carry out normal functions. Even mild dehydration can drain your energy and make you tired.

 

How much water do you need?

Every day you lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. For your body to function properly, you must replenish its water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water.

 

Several approaches attempt to approximate water needs for the average, healthy adult living in a temperate climate.

 

■Replacement approach. The average urine output for adults is about 1.5 liters (6.3 cups) a day. You lose close to an additional liter of water a day through breathing, sweating and bowel movements. Food usually accounts for 20 percent of your total fluid intake, so if you consume 2 liters of water or other beverages a day (a little more than 8 cups) along with your normal diet, you will typically replace the lost fluids.

■Eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. Another approach to water intake is the "8 x 8 rule" — drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day (about 1.9 liters). The rule could also be stated, "drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid a day," as all fluids count toward the daily total. Though the approach isn't supported by scientific evidence, many people use this basic rule as a guideline for how much water and other fluids to drink.

■Dietary recommendations. The Institute of Medicine advises that men consume roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day and women consume 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.

Even apart from the above approaches, if you drink enough fluid so that you rarely feel thirsty and produce 1.5 liters (6.3 cups) or more of colorless or slightly yellow urine a day, your fluid intake is probably adequate.

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I have heard the drink-more-water edict refuted recently. And personally, I agree!

 

It just makes your day more boring and punctuated by frequent potty breaks.

 

I also have heard (not sure where so don't ask for a link ;) ) if your body is working to excrete too much water, it cannot excrete waste as efficiently.

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When I was in the Boy Scouts, they always were on us to pee clear and often. This was at camps and outings etc. If you were peeing dark, you needed more water.

 

I have friends in the military who say they are given the same instructions.

 

Before DX, I was unable to drink much water at all. Even a few sips would give me a very acidy stomach. Now that I have lost weight and am not eating so many carbs, I can drink all the water I want. As a result, I probably over do it a bit and drink .75gal or so a day.

 

My only advice is if you want to drink lots of water (probably not a bad thing) you might want to stop at least a couple of hours before bed time. :) I sleep much better not getting up ever hour or so.

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When I was in the Boy Scouts, they always were on us to pee clear and often. This was at camps and outings etc. If you were peeing dark, you needed more water.

 

I have friends in the military who say they are given the same instructions.

 

 

Fairly sensible advice if you are on the march and need to maintain hydration. But ... some people take it too much to heart. Water narcosis can cause headache, confusion, and death. At least a couple marathoners have died that way ... a few years back.

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That is true. Good rule of thumb, if drinking water is making you feel worse, don't.

 

I had a friend OD on water, twice, when hiking! 15 yrs younger than me and I was running circles around her. She only figured it out later. Thing is she kept drinking, thinking it was dehydration ...

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Hi Gang,

 

Was wondering if drinking a bit more water helps with T2, I have been drinking more tea from time I started to take D seriously with my meds. In other post I used to punish my body (denial stage) by consuming 2 liter sodas everyday for 2 years and nearly had a heart attack as a result. For the past 3 months I have had not even a diet soda nor does my mouth have a craving anymore but have been drinking tea like 5-6 times a day until today when I drank less than a cup. Overall, I have not drank anything consistently which is getting me concerned and want to force myself to drink at least 6 cups of water a day.

 

My question to you guys is that will drinking water (warm) will help both get rid of all the daily D pills I have in my system and will it help my overall being, I know this might be a dumb question.

 

Daniel:

 

It strikes me that one of the most important variables here is what "more" means. If you currently don't drink any water, more sounds like a good idea. Does it need to be 6 glasses? I don't know, but I don't see why you need to strive for that.

 

I can't speak for T2, getting pills out of the system etc, but I do know that when I get myself to drink at least 4 glasses of water, regularly spaced through the day, I seem to function a lot better - when I don't, I can seem to get mildly dehydrated towards the end of the day. I think that does affect my blood sugars to a degree, too, putting the body under stress in any way tends to do that for me.

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I know I drink too much soda - only diet. But water, so I am told when exercising by nurses at the hospital, will raise your blood pressure it if is a little low (appearently by raising volume). Larry

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Funny how the body works if you listen to it. When I'm tired, I rest. When I'm sleepy, I sleep. When I'm hungry, I eat. When I have to pee, I pee. And when I'm thirsty...I drink. How complicated can you make that is the question.

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Funny how the body works if you listen to it. When I'm tired, I rest. When I'm sleepy, I sleep. When I'm hungry, I eat. When I have to pee, I pee. And when I'm thirsty...I drink. How complicated can you make that is the question.

 

I wish it was that simple. Eve bit the apple, and nothing has been the same since.

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I wish it was that simple. Eve bit the apple, and nothing has been the same since.
I agree with BountyMan... I do think that we (just like every other animal out there) comes equipped with a finely tuned sense of what we need to stay healthy... we may work hard against those senses with shift-work, eating foods for which we are not adapted etc... but they are still there, if we can only re-learn to listen to them.

 

When my son was growing, on some days he would barely eat enough to feed a bird and his Momma would fret... invariably the next day he ate enough for two adults! When we lived with the Inuit, many of them are still able to live a life where they eat when hungry, and sleep when tired (even I stopped wearing a watch after a while)... I've never met a group of people so ready to break out into a smile, or laugh at the slightest excuse! :)

 

---

 

As for the OP, I do think it is important that we remain well hydrated -- caffeinated drinks can be counterproductive --but I see no benefit in over-hydration.

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You have to wonder. I've read that doctors suggest you drink 8 glasses of water a day. I'm up from about 10AM in the morning to about midnight, 14 hours, nobody drinks while they're asleep. Let's establish a glass of water to be about the size of a 1/2 pint of whiskey, just for the visual. That's 8 ounces. And let's say out of that 8 ounces that my body releases about 2 of those ounces through my eyes, skin and breathing, for argument's sake. That's 6 ounces I gotta get rid of some other way.

 

Now, 14 hours is 840 minutes. You divide that up equally by 8 and you wind up drinking a 1/2 pint about every 100 minutes. Which also means you're gonna be at the toilet every 100 minutes. Sorry, if I wanted to be around toilets 8 times a day I'd get a job as a janitor in a grammar school.

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Funny how the body works if you listen to it. When I'm tired, I rest. When I'm sleepy, I sleep. When I'm hungry, I eat. When I have to pee, I pee. And when I'm thirsty...I drink. How complicated can you make that is the question.

 

In essence I agree, however I think we have been trained out of listening to ourselves with bad dietary habits and the wrong types of drinks around, and years of experience of both. It would be nice if we could just "switch on" our natural ability to look beyond habit and products that cause addiction or cravings... but being out of touch often means, we are in the dark. Look at the alcoholic who doesn't think he can live without x drinks a day. The coke(acola) addict who still feels thirsty without it weeks later and cant stand water. Both are also listening to their bodies/mind. But bodies/minds can get deluded.

 

That said, I think it's the best course of action to be sensible, provide some guidance and hope for/aim for the natural impulses of the body to return.

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I think I drink eight cups of water a day at least. I lost lots of weight because of it.

 

 

Rob :)

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Yes, swimming is excellent exercise. One fellow who swam at the beach every day lost 65 pounds. Sadly, the 65 pounds he lost was his leg...to a shark. :eek:

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I was going to start a thread on this, but I'll just ask here while we're on the subject of water....

Can dehydration raise glucose levels? I have probably been drinking more diet coke than water lately (I know, bad) and am wondering if this has something to do with my blood sugar craziness. Any thoughts?....other than to drink more water and less diet coke...I got that one. I'll just ask again...can dehydration effect glucose levels?

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Absolutely! When you become dehydrated, the amount of liquid in your blood is low in relation to the nutrients and waste products in the blood. Therefore, concentrations of glucose increase. As glucose levels increase, blood circulation through the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels, diminishes. In the short term, increased blood glucose levels can cause fatigue, blurred vision, increased thirst and an increased need to urinate. Since diabetes is characterized by increased thirst and urination anyway, if you are diabetic, dehydration can rapidly become a serious problem.

 

As to your diet Coke...unless it's "caffeine free" diet Coke, the caffeine is a diuretic. Diuretics dehydrate you by increasing urination. You're about 68% water. As soon as you start altering that percentile...bad things start happening. Oddly...you can commit suicide just by drinking too much water at one time.

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Diabetes and Dehydration

 

Diabetics should be careful to avoid fluid dehydration. In a recent book, one prominent researcher advises all readers (including diabetics) to drink fluids equivalent to half their body weight in ounces (for example, a 160 pound man should drink at least 80 ounces of fluid daily) as it makes things easier for the kidneys and gives the pancreas the fluid it needs to properly produce the insulin that regulates blood sugar levels. Fact is, the metabolism of sugar is a very fluid dependent system that quickly suffers if fluid intake is suddenly limited.

 

And don’t fall into the trap of thinking that all you have to do is pay attention to your sense of thirst. You can’t rely on your sense of thirst to keep you well hydrated. If you wait until you are thirsty to drink water, you’re waiting too long. You should consume water at regular intervals throughout the day even if your not thirsty at the moment. And that goes double for senior citizens whose sense of thirst slows with the passing years.

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As to your diet Coke...unless it's "caffeine free" diet Coke...

 

Not a chance!

I don't buy it very often because I'm compulsive about it.

I WAS exaggerating a little about drinking more of it than water though. I have been drinking probably 2 diet cokes (caffeinated, of course) a day for the past week or so. But, I really haven't been drinking very much water at all. Not sure why. I love water, just busy i guess.

I'll change this and see if the numbers improve. My guess is that they will.

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And don’t fall into the trap of thinking that all you have to do is pay attention to your sense of thirst. You can’t rely on your sense of thirst to keep you well hydrated. If you wait until you are thirsty to drink water, you’re waiting too long. You should consume water at regular intervals throughout the day even if your not thirsty at the moment. And that goes double for senior citizens whose sense of thirst slows with the passing years.

 

what a load of "beigist" cobblers...

 

:)

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Is it a form of Habit about not drinking water?? I'm sure it is. :confused:

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