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persimmons...do tell...

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anyone eat persimmons? i tried one yesterday for the first time and now i am HOOKED. trouble is, i have no idea how much to bolus. yesterday i bolused for 21g for a regular sized persimmon, and went low. google searches say anywhere from 20 to 25 g but i have my doubts, or maybe they are high GI? does anyone know where they fall on the GI index? the ones i've had aren't overly sweet...but that's not always telling :confused:

 

oh yah, and hello to everyone. it's been a while. my boys are keeping me B-U-S-Y!!!

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thanks shottlebop:)

so, i must be over-bolusing then if their GI is only 50. i keep forgetting to test at 1 hour to see if it spikes me. i tried bolusing for 15g and that worked better...

i don't know why this fruit isn't more popular...it's so delicious!

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I LOVE persimmons! Even have a Fuyu persimmon tree (I just watched the local birds pick at the last of them - so much for my Thanksgiving salad....). I use them more as a condiment than the focal point of a dish. Last weekend I chopped one up and sprinkled it over individual low carb pumpkin cheesecakes for a dinner party; Quite beautiful and delicious - guests loved them. I add them to my breakfast once in a while, and make a mean persimmon bread (not low carb - it's for gifts!). In response to your question, I can only say that I don't seem to encounter unexpected spikes when I use persimmons and I use my regular 1:10 ratio to calculate boluses. Calorie King has Japanese persimmons at 15 net carbs for a 100 gram serving.

 

Jen

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I've always loved persimmons but the last few had acted like an astringent on my lips & mouth tissue. Anyone know what causes this ? yeah I know...its probaly d :)

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Lee - I think your persimmons might not have been fully ripe. The non-Japanese varietes (at least the ones grown here in California) need to be soft, soft, soft with skins beginning to blacken before they're ready for the table. That's one reason I love the little Fuyus - they sweet and delicious when they're still firm and orange.

 

Jen

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I also love persimmons! It's true that the skins taste astringent before the fruit is fully ripe. Wait to eat it until it bursts at the slightest touch and then you'll have a truly ripe one. (Unless it's one of those "hard" varieties!) They are messy and slurpy, but they really are ambrosia. I've found that I can eat a few bites of a large persimmon (shared with one of my kids) in the context of a low-carb meal and still have good numbers, but I don't go beyond that. I used to make persimmon pudding (persimmon pulp plus some flour, buttermilk, brown sugar, cream, mixed and baked) but don't bother with that now because I like the plain fruit even better and it's lower carb anyway.

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