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GoldenBailey

8.8 a1c

17 posts in this topic

In the spring, my primary care said my A1C was normal, however, I don't know what the actual A1C number was. I was on Metformin 500 mg. x twice a day and 2 mg. Glimepiride. She told me to discontinue the Glimepiride. Last week I had an A1C done and the result was 8.8. I have been watching my diet and actually have lost 7 lbs. I'm overweight, but not obese. I'm been exercising.

 

I see my primary care in a couple of weeks. My question is if she starts the Glimepiride again, how long will it take to get it back within a normal range. Will this be difficult or once I start, will it just take me back to a normal A1C? Have I lost any ground by her changing the medicine?

 

Thanks

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I don't know the exact number. It was done in the dr's office and she just said it was in the normal range. That's why she discontinued the Glimepiride. My last two FBG are: 251 in the spring, and 218 on the current labs.

 

Thanks

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Yes, I know, but it was the next visit that she took me off the Glimepiride.

 

I'm just concerned about getting the A1C back in line. I lose a lot of protein in the urine. They say it's due to blood pressure, but I'm sure these blood sugar levels aren't helping. I spill anywhere from 1300 - 1800 and it should be under 30 and that's why I'm anxious to get it back in the normal range as quickly as possible.

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Hey GoldenBailey....Welcome to the Forum!

 

Are you testing your own BG? If not, you really need to start testing yourself. Without the knowledge of what your BG readings are, you are gambling with your health.

 

For myself, I have good control and I still test 10 times a day. I test often because I want to know where my BG is at all times, and I want to take positive steps anytime my readings get too high.

 

An A1C of 8.8 is very high, and you need to take immediate steps to gain control of your blood sugar.

 

You can get control of your BG by watching the number of carbs you eat, testing your BG, and then adjustings. TEST, TEST, TEST, and then TEST again. Only with Testing can you take charge!

 

Please update us of your continued progress! Thanks!

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My primary care doctor is VERY adamant that no one needs to test unless they are on insulin. So, no, I do not test.

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It doesn't sound like your doctor is using the current recommendations for D treatment. Even so, if she won't authorize a meter, it's not a prescription item and you can get one on your own. If you choose to use the readings to modify your diet / behavior, you will find it invaluable.

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My primary care doctor is VERY adamant that no one needs to test unless they are on insulin. So, no, I do not test.

 

ughhh - If it were me I'd get a new doctor asap. Keeping you uninformed is poor judgment on your doctors part. Knowledge is power.

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My primary care doctor is VERY adamant that no one needs to test unless they are on insulin. So, no, I do not test.

 

IMHO....that is a horrible attitude! I would find a new primary care provider.

 

Too many folks blindly follow their Doctot's directions. Most Doctors can't afford more than 10 minutes per patient, and are expected to be experts in many different fields. Therefore, I found I needed to learn more than my Doctor about MY disease.

 

I now treat my Doctor like a trusted adviser. I will listen and research his advice, but I make the decisions on what medications I take and what lifestyle I choose. After all, if I make a bad decision, I am the one who will pay for it.

 

Please consider getting the knowledge and power to be in control of your health. A good starting point is reading Dr Bernstein's book I have listed in my signature.

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I have an important recommendation for you and others. ALWAYS get a copy of your lab reports. KNOW your numbers - don't just accept "you're ok". I have copies of my lab reports dating back to 2001. In fact the last 2 times I have even asked for a copy BEFORE my visit so I can study it and have my concerns and questions ready when I see the doctor. (same doctor since 2001 - an endocronologist who works with me - not against me). Upon my request the nurse said: "oh no you can't get your lab report until you see the doctor" ...I said 'ask him' and I got it. BTW it greatly reduces my anxiety level if I can see my lab report before the doc and know what problems i may have:)

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Thanks for all the advice. I will definitely look into the book.

 

Forget the book, get a new doctor! This disease is yours, not your doctor's!! As already mentioned, get a copy of all labs!! Next, find a new PCP who is willing to work with you and YOUR disease. I have very tight control after18 months and it is from diet, working out faithfully, and counting carbs. I still test 5-8 times a day. I have lost 65 lbs to date and never felt better in my life. It gets expensive, but worth every dime to know where my numbers are before and after meals...

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I think there are a lot of diabetics out there that follow all their doctors orders without doing their own research. Many doctors don't believe testing is imperative unless you take insulin. Without bg testing you are driving blindfolded. Do you know what normal bgs are? Proably not since doctors never tell us. I was dx'd with a fasting of bg of 240 and my doctor said that was not too bad. I am glad I did my own research, when I found out normal is closer to 100 or under I freaked. So I did what I had to do to get that bg closer to 100 most of the day. There is no way I could not do this without a bg meter. I also think many Insurance companies drive this idea that Type 2's don't have to test, they don't want to pay for the strips. My insurance doesn't cover my strips, but I still buy them. They are expensive but I am partial to keeping all my essential body parts .

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GioldenBailey----gosh, it sure sounds like you are getting bombarded by folks who think you need to change your doctor. Let me just say----they are 100%, darn tooting correct. :) (Betcha you thought I was going to say something else! :D ) Here is my "twist"----I am a nurse, currently working in a well known hospital and do occasionally care for diabetic pediatric patients----and from the view of a medical professional, this is ridiculous that he/she does not approve of you testing yourself unless on insulin. What purpose does it serve to keep patients in the dark regarding their own health???? If I am coming off as ticked off and passionate, then, I am sorry, I am guilty as charged. I get so upset when I hear stories from people about how their doctor treats them/handles their health conditions. You are worth the time and effort of frequent testing to eventually get your blood sugar into a good, safe range. It's not easy to do this, but it can most definitely be done. For me, seeing those numbers really keeps me on track. I can sneak food and no one will see, but my meter is never fooled. It calls me out every time!! for me, that is good as it really helps me stay focused.

 

If nothing else, PLEASE, do as so many others have suggested and purchase a meter and start testing----even if only 1 or 2 times/day. Something is better than nothing. :)

 

Oh, and welcome to DF. It is nice to meet you and I hope that we can be a help and encouragement to you.

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Thanks everyone for your advise. Like you, I always get my lab results before the appointment. That gives me time to look them over, do research, if needed, and get my questions ready. I try to make the most of my appointment time. That's how I know my A1C is 8.8 (206 average) before my upcoming appointment. I keep them, so that also gives me a comparison.

 

I also get a copy of all MRI's, CT scans, etc.

 

However, she uses the outside lab infrequently and mostly does the A1C in her office and usually just tells me it's OK or whatever. Last time she said it was normal. I asked for the number and she again said, it's in the normal range and I'm taking you off the Glimepiride, so no, I don't have a number when she told me it was normal.

 

That was in the spring. At an appointment three months later I told her I was concerned being taken off the Glimepiride and could we check the A1C. She said, she felt it would be OK since I was normal in the Spring and she would take it before the next appointment - that was about a total of 6-7 months after being taken off Glimepiride before an A1C recheck. I told her I felt uneasy about it.

 

I'm going to have a serious talk with her at my next appointment. Overall, she is a very good doctor and usually gives the right amount of "doctoring" but I'm concerned on this one issue. She and my kidney doctor work very closely together and I'd hate to lose that doctor as well.

 

Thanks everyone

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Wow GoldenBailey, this thread is so disturbing it has pulled me out of hiding.

 

I understand your attachment to your Dr(s), but you need to understand that your treatment appears to be falling FAR short of a reasonable standard. It is likely that your BP and your kidney problems are being caused by your diabetes, for which it sounds like you are receiving very poor treatment.

 

You've been advised by a cross section of posters here that you should seek a new Dr. and/or start testing yourself to monitor your own numbers. Your past actions can't be changed, but moving forward if you fail to follow the reasonable suggestions offered here, you're the one in the wrong. And you'll have plenty of time to consider your decision while you're hooked up to the dialysis machine. You really need to take charge of your health.

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