raffi

2017 Bicycling - Neither snow nor rain nor...

235 posts in this topic

Hi all,

 

Yeah - agreed with the cold toes/feet.  I have honkin' big feet (13EEEE, or 48/49).  I have yet to find proper shoe covers that'll fit; about the best I can do are wool socks (Castelli 'Quindici' ) and toe covers.  Those help, a lot, but still limit my 'deep winter' riding to about an hour or so.

 

Stay safe!

JT

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I had to replace my wheels.  Front wheel was loose and actually wobbling.  It seemed to happen pretty suddenly.  Took the wheel off and tightened the cones but that only lasted a short time.  Took the wheels in and mechanic said I should replace them.  He could do a rebuild but new wheels would be better bang for my buck. 

 

I did manage to do the whole changeout by myself. Just took my time.  I was surprised at how much effort to took to remove the cassette from the rear wheel.

 

Have nearly 4,000 miles on Fiare already.  Any other maintenance I should consider?  Mechanic says I should consider changing out the cassette.  Riding in Hawaii is extraordinarily hard on bike.  The dirt is not soil but actually fine lava cinder which just tears everything up.  I took my old wheels apart and I could see where the grit got in there and tore everything up.  The mechanic says that it is often better to replace than to try to rebuild hubs (especially on the lower end) for that reason.

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Meyery,

 

Yeah, I can imagine that volcanic dust is pretty abrasive. Your original wheels - sounds like they were loose bearing/cup and cone construction? If so, yeah, new wheels with cartridge bearings might not be a bad investment. I'd think then that just replacing bearings as needed would get you a long way down the road (so to speak :)  ).

 

Has the chain been replaced? If not, it's probably really worn, and that, in turn will also wear the cassette. Ask your mechanic about drivetrain cleaning/maintenance, and what lube is recommended for your conditions. Invest in chain wear checker if you don't already have one (a really good one is only about $20 ...)

 

Good luck, let us know what you decide to do ...

 

-JT

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JT - The bike shop spoils me lol...

 

I am on my 3rd chain in one year.  I apparently wear them out that quickly.  I do have a chain checker and have done one on my own.  We have had numerous talks on drive train maintenance.  I managed to destroy the bearings in my original rear hub because I would liberally spray degreaser all over everything.  Yeah, I got quite the scolding and a $90 invoice to rebuild the hub.  He had the cups and cones off and made me look at the havoc the degreaser caused.  The RULE is now no degreaser spraying near the bike.  Apply with a rag.  We learn from mistakes and I enjoy performing maintenance.

 

I also get the talk about too much lubricant on the chain but I am getting better at that.

 

When I put my new wheels on, I soaked the cassette in paint thinner.  It was amazing how much grime came off.

 

He has me use wet weather lube since Hilo is so rainy and I ride a lot.

 

Apparently, I have cred there as well too.  The owner was telling me how he sees me all over the place and he admitted to surprise.  His experience is 90% buy a bike and it ends up sitting doing nothing.

 

 

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Meyer,

 

Thanks for the details; sounds like you're doing the right things for your conditions (and yes, we all <hopefully!> do learn from our mistakes).

 

Your chain wear seems about right to me - worst I've had was ~700 miles on the OEM chain on the commuter (Felt brand bike); otherwise, it seems like I get around 1500 miles or so out of one. I've tried KMC and various Shimano branded chains; the performance and wear seemed all about the same.

 

I, too, have been scolded by the local mechanics about too much chain lube :) -- now, when it's time to clean and lube the chain, I mark one link with a dab of orange nail polish (bought at the local dollar store).  That way, I know *exactly* where to stop lubing.  The polish wears off after a bit ..

 

No riding for me this last weekend - too wet, and too many scheduling conflicts for the little bit of dry time ...

 

Stay safe out there!

 

JT

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It was a little warmer this morning and the roads are pretty soft from recent rains, so I took the fatbike (not currently studded). This was a good decision up until I reached town at which point I found out (the hard way) that town is covered in ice. The bike went out from under me around a corner at the edge of town and while there was no damage to the bike and only a little tweaking to me, it meant I was very slowly picking my way the rest of the way to work.

 

Guess I will only ride on studs until winter is over...

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@raffi - I took a spill in some gravel a few weeks ago.  It was at the Mac Nut factory store.  The 12 year old in me thought I would look cool riding across the gravel and that plan worked for about 15 feet until I hit a thick patch of gravel which caught the front wheel and tipped me over.  I couldn't clip out in time so I just fell over with the bike and hoped for the best.

 

Other than some wounded pride and a skinned elbow, rider and bike were fine.  I am now "that guy" at the store and have been compared with the customer that got stuck in the same gravel patch in his electric wheelchair.  This was told to me to cheer me up.  The manager broke out her trusty first aid kit and patched me up.

 

I go there nearly every ride and stop for coffee and so I now am warmly greeted and walk my bike across the gravel :)

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meyery2k,

 

I've certainly taken my share of spills and all in all, I'd rather go down in ice than gravel, having done both, I can say that ice results in less road rash. :) Most of the time, it's the hit to the pride that hurts the worst. ;)

 

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On Sunday - I completed my second statue century.  I planned to do an "epic" ride on Saturday, Veteran's Day, but stormy weather grounded me.  I was all prepped with water and mentally ready so I went for it the next day.  The new wheels on my bike performed flawlessly.  I have noticed that my riding technique has improved much since my last century on Memorial Day.  That and being a little more fit equated to less fatigue.  Unfortunately my average was still only 13.1 MPH but there are some good climbs on my route.  Nothing major but 1000' over 4 miles slows you down a bit :)

 

This century can be a challenge to me since there is a gentle climb to about 500 over 17 miles then downhill to the coast.  Tooling along the coast is fairly flat and then I have to come back up that same hill or take the other road mentioned above.  Either way, what went down has to come back up after about a 50 mile ride.

Edited by meyery2k
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