Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Sweetyrelax

Hypogycemia after exercise

23 posts in this topic

Hello,

I am new to this forum and have type 2 diabetes for past 13 years. I am on metformin, glyxambi and glipizide.I recently had a hypoglycemic seizure after exercise. I found out after vigorous exercise of 1-2 hours my sugar drops low to 50 after 4 hours. How to control this? Should I stop exercising?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had that usually with vigorous excercise in the evening.

Don't stop exercising,!   Try variations, not working out as hard, maybe intervals. I consume some carbs during exercise.  When I run I carry cliff shot blocks. And cosume some every mile.

It is disconcerting when the exercise was fun and you feel bad afterward.  Sometimes it would take me a day to feel right again.  

 

Also talk your doctor about you meds and exercise.  I was only on metformin , but still tended to go low during exercise so we dropped it. Which helped a lot. 

It is hard to find a balance with it all.  

I would test BG more during and after exercise  

'

 

 

meyery2k and macksvicky like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the response. My last A1c was 8.1. I am feeling scared after my hypoglycemic seizure. I have been put on seizure medication. I usually drink Gatorade during exercise. The level shows 250 after exercise and starts dropping low. I test my blood sugar at regular intervals the day I exercise. Even swimming makes the level go low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A huge drop from 250 will really make you feel bad! It may be better to drink a non sugared sports drink instead and check your numbers before you start an exercise and eat a lowish carb snack with protein and then stop at some point and check again and eat more if you are gong lower. I know it's a lot of checking but it may help to know more about how your body responds to different exercises. And you'll be able to catch a lowering blood sugar before it becomes a problem.

 

I can do fast walks for hours with no lows, I'll actually temporarily gain 10-20 points. Water aerobics and leg work on a mat will not effect it either but after 2 or 3 hours of lifting weights, it'll drop like a rock. I test before I go into the gym, that determines what and how much I eat before I start working out. Plus, I test again before I even turn the car on to make sure I'm not lower than I want to be before driving.

Fraser, adiantum, Java and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gatorade actually makes matter worse extreme high glycemic index, it's worse than sugar

i agree you need a lower carb lower glycemic index choice .

as I said I use Cliff blocks, 8 carbs per block, suppose to be used during exercise and to not spike your BG as high. 

At 230 is way to high after exercise. It just super starts what insulin you are producing a the insulin is not well controlled so it will be continued to be produced and push you lower.  It is call a reactive low.  

So lots of room for adjustments. 

I try to start a run (I am 72 so it not really a run) at 130 to 140 I concur 8 gm of carb or more each mile. I end up at 90 to 120.   When I use to really carb up I would crash by then end of the run.

so practice moderation and test. I agree with Vicki

 

FYI Cliff Shots now has an iron man logo on it.  I am sure they are a sponser

certainly does no mean they work any better. 

 

 

Edited by Fraser
meyery2k, macksvicky and TX_Clint like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sweetyrelax said:

Thank you for the response. My last A1c was 8.1. I am feeling scared after my hypoglycemic seizure. I have been put on seizure medication. I usually drink Gatorade during exercise. The level shows 250 after exercise and starts dropping low. I test my blood sugar at regular intervals the day I exercise. Even swimming makes the level go low.

 

The doctor putting you on anti-seizure medication after having a low sugar episode strikes me as wildly inappropriate.  Never have I heard of a T1 diabetic being put on anti-seizure medication to mitigate the effects of extreme hypoglycemia.  Just drink extra Gatorade if you are going low.

 

I'd be curious to hear from other T2 about taking three different medications at once.  Metformin... which prevents the absorption of carbs ,Glipizide which stimulates the pancreas to produce more insulin and then honestly I can't find a good description of what exactly glyxambi is or does.  It seems overkill and dangerous to me... but then I'm not a doctor.

macksvicky, Carol_42, adiantum and 3 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glyxambi is a combination drug of Jardiance and Tradjenta.

 

Metformin helps with insulin resistance and minimizes the amount of glycogen released by the liver.

Glipizide pushes the pancreas to release more insulin

Jardiance makes you pee glucose

Tradjenta prevents the degradation of the hormone incretin.  While that hormone is active in the blood stream, the pancreas will continue to try to produce insulin.

 

So 2 of the medications basically force the pancreas to make more and more of its own insulin and a third also actively lowers glucose by making you pee it out of your system.

 

That's a lot of meds with very little room for fine control based upon your needs.

 

I agree with Fraser and Vicky, it sounds to me like you are basically getting a series of over corrections which just makes the situation worse, not better.  I'd seriously consider Fraser's recommendation.

 

Anti-seizure meds won't do shoot to stop the results of a seriously bad hypo.  I also question your doctor on the subject.

Carol_42, meyery2k, NoraWI and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am concerned too by the amount of medications. The doctor put me on these medications to control my A1c which I think is fluctuating with my exercises. I am at a loss at what to do. I eat right, exercise and am dosed with these medications and end up with hypoglycemic seizure. Maybe I should go to an endo or change doctor.

Carol_42 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, go to an endocrinologist.  Seriously, I'm utterly flabbergasted by a doctor giving someone anti-seizure medication to treat low blood sugar.  And I don't use the word flabbergasted lightly or often.   It's fun though (using the word flabbergasted, not having low blood sugar caused seizing... that's no fun at all)

Java, TX_Clint, Carol_42 and 3 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you give more details on the "eat right" portion.  If I ate like my doctors and dietitian instructed me to, I'd be on just as many meds as you are.

meyery2k, Java and macksvicky like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had yesterday for example ww bread and egg for breakfast with coffee, mid morning fruit, vegetarian burrito(whole wheat) for lunch, mid afternoon fruit  and dinner of chicken with veggies. I usually swim or play sports for an hour every other day. Walk after dinner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breakfast for me is usually something like eggs cooked in creamed spinach (eggs, spinach, heavy whipping cream, seasonings).

 

Lunch is usually something along the lines of a fatty protein of some kind and veggies cooked in butter.  Today was egg salad with celery (I was lazy).

 

Dinner last night was an Vito Unwhich from Jimmy Johns with lots of lettuce, peppers, cucumbers, tomato, onion, and mayo.

 

Do you count your carb intake?

 

I personally no longer eat any grains at all (wheat, rice, barley, oats, corn, etc), most root vegetables (with the exception of things like onions, garlic, etc as seasonings), and almost all fruit.  Exceptions are the non sweet fruits like tomato, avocado, and zucchini, or a few berries when they are in season and taste the best.

 

As you described it, your diet is almost exclusively carbohydrates.  The body turns all carbohydrates into sugar during the digestion process.

 

Edited by Kit
macksvicky, meyery2k, NoraWI and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the sample diet. Will follow and try to cut more carbs. I cut out white stuff and switched to whole wheat. My thought was to have some carbs and protein before exercise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The big rule many of us here keep in mind is to "eat to your meter".

 

What does that mean?  It means we test ourselves before eating (get a baseline) and then again around 2 hours after the first bite (this timing could vary for a number of reasons but 2 is a decent rule).

 

What you want to try to do is minimize the rise you have at 2 hours.  My personal goal is to be back near I was when I started, though I will accept up to a 20 point rise.

 

If what you are had you going higher than your personal goals, next time make some modifications to the meal.  Drop some of the carbier items, replace with something else, and try it again.  What this will do is show you how your body reacts to various foods given your current treatment methods and give you a list of foods that work well and ones that don't.

 

Example of possible replacements.  Instead of rice, tried rices cauliflower.  I personally use zucchini noodles (zoodles) in my stir frys in place of rice or noodles.  It works excellently.  If I want eggs benedict, I serve it on a bed of sauteed spinach or zucchini fritters (http://slimpalate.com/zucchini-fritters-paleo-grain-free-gluten-free/).  Might consider mashed cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes (I don't personally like it but many here do) or look at turnips instead which have significantly lower carb level.

 

If I want a burger I don't have it with a bun.  Instead I serve it on a bed of sauteed veggies with all the usual condiments and eat with a fork.  Or maybe wrapped in lettuce if you want to eat with your fingers.

 

Volume wise, my diet is actually dominated by vegetables, they are just low carb choices instead of higher carb ones.

 

You can also look at alternates such as breads make from almond or coconut flours or flax meal.  They're not exactly the same, but can be good in their own right.

I personally like these biscuits   http://nobunplease.com/zesty-cheddar-biscuits/

They make excellent biscuits and gravy if you cut down on the garlic powder.  Its a little strong IMO.

 

That just leaves you with your target goals.  The CDC states that the risk of complications due to diabetes goes down to that of non diabetics with an A1C under 6.0.

This usually translates to

Under 100 fasting and pre meals.

Under 140 1 hour post meal

Under 120 2 hours post meal.

meyery2k and macksvicky like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much! Hope its not too late for me. 13 years of medication...

macksvicky, JohnSchroeder and meyery2k like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think positive.  Its never too late.  :)  It sounds like you are an active person.  That will help a lot.

 

The goal of the diet change is to actually minimize your medication intake.  If you can reduce or eliminate some of those meds, the likelihood that you'll have dangerous lows drops significantly and what might happen will be less extreme and much easier to manage.

 

JohnSchroeder, meyery2k and macksvicky like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed that when I swim for 30 minutes, my BG elevates. After 40 minutes, my BG levels off and after 45 minutes, my BG starts to quickly fall. Accordingly, I need to ingest carbs whenever I anticipate exercising for more than 30 minutes.

 

Because I have insulin resistance, I take Metformin. However, my pancrease produces very little insulin so I am also on insulin. In addition, I inject Symlin (artificial a amylan also produced by the pancrease) before eating, which slows down the digestion process, allowing more time to process the carbs.

Edited by don1942
macksvicky and meyery2k like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My diet is similiar to Kits although she  is a way better cook.

when in season I add an avacado which has good fatty carbs,

i don't assume I ever need to eat carbs.  I airways test before exercise, if I am 90 or under I consume may be 8 carbs.  I learned if I needed to consume more carbs during exercise by testing every 10 to 15 minutes. Just for one race or two.  See see what by BG pattern is.

i est before and after Exercise now.  Eventually you can sense if you BG needs improvement

Just take things slowly, very low car, then add different foods and test. The old adage that you did not become a diabetic in one day it takes a while to unravel all the information. 

 

 

meyery2k, macksvicky and TX_Clint like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good information here. 

Of course no two us are the same.  I am the opposite of Don. I seem to make plenty of insulin. Just don't use it well. So if keep a even BG level and keep my eating in small a mount and similiar time an amount each day 

meyery2k and macksvicky like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chiming in a little late here but I adopted the low carb high fat diet about 2 years ago when diagnosed with diabetes.  I was sedentary and also began an exercise program.  I can now cycle 100 miles plus on minimal carbs.  I have found that now that my body has adapted to fat as a fuel source it sustains me far better than carbs.  I can also run 5K, 10K, and swim 1 mile plus.

 

On 2 long distance rides, I made a point of consuming a meal that was fatty meat with salad.  On both occasions, I experienced that I had the energy I needed and it seemed to be much more sustained versus the fish and chip lunch I would usually partake.

 

Many athletes have adopted high fat with great success.  

 

Everyone is different so this may, or may not, work for you but it might be worth a try.  It takes a little time to get into ketosis (fat burning) mode but it is worth it.

 

For the most part, I follow Kit's diet.  No rice, bread, grains, pasta, sugar, fruit, root vegetables, potatoes.  I am able to maintain my weight and BG easily.  My lipids are also excellent. ~ Mike

macksvicky and Dave_KC like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My diet is pretty close to @meyery2k and @Kit, fats and proteins, very little carbs.  I find these days when life gets busy at work and I work right through lunch time, no problem, I actually have the energy to keep going, and that included climbing on top of walls and chasing wires all over a building today.  

 

I'll follow it up with a couple thousand step walk with the dog tonight, and a daily intake of somewhere between 40 and 50 grams of carbs total. 

macksvicky and meyery2k like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0