Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Gabby123

What does bolus mean???

11 posts in this topic

Generally speaking there are NO stupid questions about Diabetes.

 

 

 

Bolus is when you inject/pump extra amount of fast-acting insulin to cover a low or, more often it the insulin you inject to cover any food you have eaten.

 

or more accurately, the # of carbs you have ingested

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bolus is when you inject/pump extra amount of fast-acting insulin to cover a low

 

Ummmm I would hate to be around you when I'm low. :goodnight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bolus can be used both ways. Diabetics refer to an injection of insulin to counter high blood glucose while the medical profession uses bolus correctly to mean an injection to correct a condition quickly - high or low. They use it to correct lows by injecting a sugar fluid(simplified) when the patient cannot take anything orally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whewww I got scared a minute there. I was thinking bolus was for only a correction of high or for intake of food. I will now have to add that to my diabetic terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
camjen1

 

rzrbks

Bolus is when you inject/pump extra amount of fast-acting insulin to cover a low

 

 

Ummmm I would hate to be around you when I'm low.

 

 

You mean like I was when I wrote this? lol

 

Actually, I was thinking of the tubes of glucose I get and use sometimes when I'm low----was taught by CDE that wife ( or kindly stranger) was to inject (squeeze) the contents into mouth.

 

 

My VERY Bad,

 

it should have read

 

Bolus is when you inject/pump extra amount of fast-acting insulin to cover a low or high, more often, it's the insulin you inject to cover any food you have eaten.

 

 

Thanks for pointing out my mistakecamjen1

 

bolus

 

SYLLABICATION: bo·lus

PRONUNCIATION: bls

NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. bo·lus·es

1. A round mass: “A dense bolus of trapped dolphins fills the frame” (Kenneth Browser). 2a. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, such as a dose of a drug, intended for therapeutic use and taken orally. b. A concentrated mass of a substance administered intravenously for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. 3. A soft mass of chewed food within the mouth or alimentary canal.

 

http://www.bartleby.com/61/77/B0377700.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me correct myself. I did not to mean that the diabetic community uses bolus wrong - it is just being used to mean something specific when it has more meanings that do apply to diabetics as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assumed bolus only ment for a correction or intake of food. Now that you mention what a bolus ment for correcting a low means makes total sense now. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You mean like I was when I wrote this? lol

 

Actually, I was thinking of the tubes of glucose I get and use sometimes when I'm low----was taught by CDE that wife ( or kindly stranger) was to inject (squeeze) the contents into mouth.

 

 

My VERY Bad,

 

it should have read

 

 

 

 

Thanks for pointing out my mistakecamjen1

 

 

 

http://www.bartleby.com/61/77/B0377700.html

Fast acting insulin only for highs.

 

Carbohydrate bolus for lows. But for purposes of this board, it means fast acting insulin for highs or food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BOLUS is latin for 'lump' and in diabetes usage is a poor choice term meaning ... to add insulin in a 'lump' amount as opposed to BASAL (another poor choice latin usage) which

means 'low or base' hence BASE rate (Basal rate). Unfortunately many medical terms have their root origins in Latin which stems back to medieval times when Latin institutions

had a monopoly on written data (similar to Botanics).

 

In reality UK we know BASAL to be our 'daily insulin ('Base') rate' and BOLUS to be our 'instant insulin inject rate ('lump' of insulin at once!)'

 

You could refer to BASAL as your 'base' rate amount and BOLUS as your instant 'lump' inject amount.

 

Ah Latin, it can make a mockery of learning and over-complicate things... I mean, why call a spade a spade when you can refer to it as

'AN INORGANO ORGANO INTERFACE MODULE'

 

Why cut out the fog by using plain english when you can bring down a thick mist of latin and confuse everybody.

 

Our ancient ancestors named the chickadee because of the simple sound it made... 'chickadee, chickadee, chickadee'

Yet in our local zoo a professor refers to this chickadee as 'a great crested tit' (you should see the latin name!!!) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BOLUS is latin for 'lump' and in diabetes usage is a poor choice term meaning ... to add insulin in a 'lump' amount as opposed to BASAL (another poor choice latin usage) which

means 'low or base' hence BASE rate (Basal rate). Unfortunately many medical terms have their root origins in Latin which stems back to medieval times when Latin institutions

had a monopoly on written data (similar to Botanics).

 

In reality UK we know BASAL to be our 'daily insulin ('Base') rate' and BOLUS to be our 'instant insulin inject rate ('lump' of insulin at once!)'

 

You could refer to BASAL as your 'base' rate amount and BOLUS as your instant 'lump' inject amount.

 

Ah Latin, it can make a mockery of learning and over-complicate things... I mean, why call a spade a spade when you can refer to it as

'AN INORGANO ORGANO INTERFACE MODULE'

 

Why cut out the fog by using plain english when you can bring down a thick mist of latin and confuse everybody.

 

Our ancient ancestors named the chickadee because of the simple sound it made... 'chickadee, chickadee, chickadee'

Yet in our local zoo a professor refers to this chickadee as 'a great crested tit' (you should see the latin name!!!) :)

 

I know you are new to the forum, so I just wanted to let you know that you can look at the time and date stamp on the dark blue horizontal line to see when this thread was active. You just answered someone who posted a question 6 YEARS ago.

 

How about going to the Intro thread and introducing yourself. Do you have Diabetes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites