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NoSugar

Doctor Refuses To Give Me Pump!!!

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I am new to this forum, so I am shocked to read how many Type 1 people are using the pump. It seems great - image never to get high sugar levels again. Wow!!! Understandly, as someone who experiences a lot of low readings too, having a low reaction must be a concern.

My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

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I am new to this forum, so I am shocked to read how many Type 1 people are using the pump. It seems great - image never to get high sugar levels again. Wow!!! Understandly, as someone who experiences a lot of low readings too, having a low reaction must be a concern.

My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

First off, you need to understand, highs happen on the pump. It's just another way to get insulin.

 

What reason did your doctor give you for not getting a pump?

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Welcome to the forum, if I haven't told you that elsewhere.

 

First we need a little more info. Why are you and your doctor fighting about it? Is he anti-pump in general? I know a few endo's that just don't want to take the time to learn about pumps, and therefore they won't prescribe items they have no knowledge of since they would be useless in helping you master the product.

 

Or is there a specific reason he doesn't think a pump will work for you? Lifestyle? Your current treatment method? What was your last A1C?

 

Tell us a little more about your situation and I think you'll get alot more help.

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Depending on how old your endo is, this is common. In my experience, and from what I have read here on this forum, the older the endo the less likely they are to prescribe a pump, for various reasons.

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I had to try a few endos before I found one I liked, no reason to stick with one endo if he/she is not meeting your needs.

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I think it really depends on your doc's personal experience, and also the milieu they work in. Within an hour of my son's diagnosis, still in emerg, we were getting a pep talk about the benefits of the pump, and this at a fairly small-town hospital. Turns out one of the emergency room nurses wears one, so I guess she's a walking advertisement with the local docs.

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Nosugar,

 

find a new Dr if you really want a pump. You can go to minimed's website and look up Drs on their site that are pump advocates. Find one in your area. If you don't want a minimed pump and prefer a different brand that doesnt matter but thier site has a good database of pump friendly Drs.

 

http://www.mymedpages.com/pf/search.do?actionCode=1&websiteParm=mmedc

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I am new to this forum, so I am shocked to read how many Type 1 people are using the pump. It seems great - image never to get high sugar levels again. Wow!!! Understandly, as someone who experiences a lot of low readings too, having a low reaction must be a concern.

My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

 

don't expect pumping to eliminate all high bg's. It doesn't. In fact, some complain about the possibility of going into DKA because of infusion issues.

 

If you and your endo don't see eye to eye on the subject, I strongly urge you to do what took me years to figure out--namely, CHANGE ENDOS! Call around for a pump friendly endo and make an appointment, even if he/she is a bit far away, if that's the only one you can find.

 

Just don't expect miracles--you'll get both hypo and hyper while pumping--but the swings should be less severe than on MDI if you are like me. On MDI, I did glucagon a few times, 911 calls, and very high bg's nearly every day (I didn't have a meter back then). On a pump, no 911 calls or Glucagon needed in 10 years. and my highs aren't as high.

 

Bottom line: if your expectations are too lofty, you'll just end up being unhappy with pumping and will wonder why we are so "pro-pump" here...

 

Your A1c should drop after you go on a pump and get it leveled out.

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The other side of it is that your endo might not feel you're actually ready for a pump. Your doctor's job isn't to give you what you've decided is best for your diabetes treatment - their job is use all that training and experience and knowledge that you don't have to ascertain what's the best treatment plan for you.

 

It might be that your doctor isn't convinced that you're capable of safely using a pump yet and would rather keep you on your current treatment plan until they feel you are capable. Instead of asking "why won't my doctor give me a pump?", you should be asking "what can I do to convince my doctor that a pump is the right treatment choice for me?"

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My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

 

My advice to you is change Dr's.

I went to 3 different endo's before I found the right one, and tommorrow I am getting hooked up on the pump!!!!!!!

 

So all my pumping family out there .....Get ready for questions in a few days........lol

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My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

Ditto what everyone else said about being ready for and educated enough to use a pump. But I would call BS regarding a med pro dictating how MY disease is managed. I guess I'm lucky in one respect - I work with a CDE to manage my care - I do not use an endo or a GP. She has 9 years in the field, is a practicing PA and really knows her stuff. We work together to make decisions. I work like a dog to stay current, track data, eat right...generally make diabetes my second job. Maybe my first - I'm gonna' live as long and as healthy as I can. My CDE writes all my scrips, worked with me to employ Symlin in my MDI routine - no endo necessary! I got on a pump within 3 months of diagnosis - no endo necessary!

 

When I see all the hoops we go through to employ the services of an endo I wonder how often it's necessary. I am admittedly new to this game, have few complications and have never seen an endo. But how much of our collective disease management is just keeping the health care industry afloat? What does an endo have in his arsenal that a good CDE (with the authority and accoutability mine does) does not? They aren't going to give us a transplant, they aren't going cure us, they are going to fiddle with meds.

 

If I don't have anything beyond diabetes (no thyroid problems, minimal neuropathy) I can't see the necessity of an endo. Besides - where I live, the nearest endo is 6 hours and 2 mountain passes away.

 

Like I said - I'm new at this - tell me where I'm wrong.

 

Regards,

 

Joe

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Exactly - work with your endo or whoever else is part of your care team. Just remember that they do generally know what they're talking about, and that you aren't automatically entitled to a pump just because you have diabetes.

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I am new to this forum, so I am shocked to read how many Type 1 people are using the pump. It seems great - image never to get high sugar levels again. Wow!!! Understandly, as someone who experiences a lot of low readings too, having a low reaction must be a concern.

My problem is my endro doctor doesn't want to prescribe me the pump. It would be great. Unfortunately, we keep fighting about it. Does anyone have this problem?

 

im sorry to here this...fight for your right... give him a bit of a argument about it

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I had the same problem, I was 28 at the time and my sugars were all over the place. I really hate Endos like this, my 1st one said he would not put me on the pump until my A1C was at 4 and my blood sugars were between 70-120 for a year. people like this need to seek a different job because I got a pump from a different doc 3 months later and my sugars are 100% better now.

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I had the same problem, I was 28 at the time and my sugars were all over the place. I really hate Endos like this, my 1st one said he would not put me on the pump until my A1C was at 4 and my blood sugars were between 70-120 for a year. people like this need to seek a different job because I got a pump from a different doc 3 months later and my sugars are 100% better now.

 

 

My endo would be mad at me if my a1c was 4, and 70-120 all the time is literally impossible. My doctor doesn't even want me there all the time- he prefers 140s after eating.

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I had the same problem, I was 28 at the time and my sugars were all over the place. I really hate Endos like this, my 1st one said he would not put me on the pump until my A1C was at 4 and my blood sugars were between 70-120 for a year. people like this need to seek a different job because I got a pump from a different doc 3 months later and my sugars are 100% better now.

 

My insurance company won't even pay for one if my A1C is under 6.0%. The only way they will pay for one if it's been 4 years and it's a replacement pump. But if I went 10 years down the road, switched to MDI for 4 years, and had a 5.5% A1C on MDI, I'd never be able to go back on a pump.

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