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Why is my blood sugar high every morning?

I'm a 16 year old type one diabetic and every morning my blood sugar levels have been 200-250 for the past month or so. I'm also on an insulin pump and i've been increasing my insulin rates overnight frequently and its not working. Im starting to get really mad because i dont know what to do. Im very athletic and i follow my diet. My blood sugar levels lower back down to normal as the day goes on. This is a big problem for me because i take very difficult classes at school and with my blood sugar always being high, i start to get very sleepy in class and i cant focus which is making me fall behind. I need help please!!!

IronmaidenFTW27

IronmaidenFTW27

 

Nµ30 Magazine

I’m happy. All day, every day, I’m elated. You see – I used to be a Type II Diabetic. I’m not anymore. I can say that honestly. Even my endocrinologist agrees, and he thinks that’s impossible. The fact remains, however, that my A-1cs – with no medication – have been consistent at 4.5 for the past two years.   I’m not managing my Diabetes; I’ve cured my Diabetes. No hype, no Tibetan miracle cures, No magic. I did it through hard work, hard science and some simple, good old-fashioned logic.   I did it with the help and encouragement of my doctors, not in spite of them. Neither of them, however, held out much hope for my success.   I did it with my parents’ generous financial help and emotional support. I did it with the constant driving push of my two personal trainers. I did it by exploring alternatives in both medicine and lifestyle.   And… sadly, I did it by ignoring the ADA and all the dieticians and “web-doctors” who constantly gave me information that seemed to make no sense.   My wife came home, one afternoon, beaming with pride in having purchased the latest ADA cookbook. I started looking through it. Nothing in this book appeared extremely low carbohydrate to me. In fact, they actually had recipes that called for sugar – good old fashioned, white, processed, table sugar! Oh, we fought like two wet cats in a sack, Maureen and I. She wanted me to follow the advice of the “experts,” but something inside me just kept telling me that they were wrong. How can you fight Diabetes by eating sugar? It just doesn’t make any sense.   In fact, the ADA appeared to be more concerned about salt! Oh yeah, right. I just spent 10 and ½ hours in the Emergency room, because I had too much salt in my blood. That must be why they had to give me all that saline.   Here I was, thirsty all the time, and the one element that would allow my body to process and store water, is contra-indicated by the community dedicated to helping me manage my disease. Meanwhile, the single organic toxin that was turning my kidneys into charcoal, and my hemoglobin into sludge was considered part of a recommended diet.   I was told to exercise. I laugh when I think about it. They told me to go walk around a mall. That’s what they said. Walk around a mall? If that’s exercise, why do I see so many blobs of excess flesh, waddling around in malls?   70% of Americans are overweight. 40% of us are actually morbidly obese. 26 million people in this country have Type II Diabetes. What used to be called “adult onset,” is now commonly diagnosed in 11 year-olds.   I sat in the waiting room of the Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Care clinic. A very nice man, also a patient, was telling me how he had effectively cut down from 12 Cokes per day, to 6. That’s a half a pound of sugar a day! Half a pound! Oh, perhaps I should mention that the primary sugar source in Coke is High Fructose Corn Syrup, which carries with it a 4 – 1 molar ratio over regular sucrose. So – basically – convert that ½ pound of sugar into the chemical equivalent of 2 pounds of table sugar.   That’s OK. Just avoid too much salt, take your Metformin religiously, and maybe you should consider a Statin to lower your LDL serum cholesterol.   I’m sorry if this post sounds angry, bitter, and perhaps even hateful. I apologize for any tone of judgmental meanness. I understand how frustrating and emotionally crippling this disease can be. I’ve been there. I remember the embarrassment, the isolation, and the frustration.   I remember the confusion. I remember how sick the Metformin made me feel. I remember the prognoses of dialysis, amputation and pre-mature death. I remember my endocrinologist, pronouncing sentence. “You will take this medicine for the rest of your life.”   Moreover, I remember when I decided to take back my life. When I decided to grab the reigns, and stop this merry-go-round. Eating a drug that makes you incontinent, nauseated, and dizzy, while trudging around a mall for 20 minutes, as your blood glucose peaks and dips, isn’t the answer.   Metabolic manipulation is. Re-teaching your body to work like the machine it was designed to be is. It’s hard, and it takes a long time. I’m not offering anybody a magic bullet. I’m not peddling a false panacea. I’m trying to tell you that you don’t have to be a Diabetic. Essentially, you’ll be trying to accomplish something that is generally considered impossible, so you can’t expect it to be easy. It takes massive sacrifice. It costs massive amounts of money. It requires massive amounts of time.   If you ask me, though – if you ask someone who can, again enjoy the life he was given, free of this overwhelming penance – it’s a great trade.

BitcoDavid

BitcoDavid

 

I'm new to taking insulin and need advice - Anyone?

ok so lately the doctors put me on humalog and I need more advice from people that have been there done that. I'm type 2 a Heavy Women = 352lbs .... I know Big... height = 5'3 Have metabolic syndrome asthma RA = Rheumatoid arthritis Fibromialga   I take metaphormin and insulin shots to control my sugar levels, But I don't think I'm taking it right. I'm afraid to take it to often and to little.the way I have been taking my meds is = metaphormin normally twice a day and the shots when ever it gets to high. My doctor did not give me that much info on any of this of when to take it - other then she said - take it when it gets to high. She told me to take 1 unit of insulin when my sugar level goes higher then 150ml and when I do - it drops to 86 or so ml So is that right?   please if you have any advice for me i would really appreciate it!!!!!   Thank You.

*Tammy*

*Tammy*

 

severe leg cramps

My husband has very severe leg cramps at night. Lately they seemed to be happening more often. Does anyone have anything they have tried and worked to help them to be less severe? We have tried a little bit of everything for it to only work for a short time. Even a book that might help would be nice.

Wifeofadiabetic

Wifeofadiabetic

 

1 Month Anniversary

Wednesday was my 4th visit to my endocrinologist office since my diagnosis last month, and for the first time since D-Day (1/20/2011), I feel positive about my outlook. The fellow (who still looks like a Katie to me, even though her name is actually Kathy) that I've met with the last couple visits was thrilled with my blood sugar readings for the past couple weeks and with how I've been doing overall. I found out that my official status remains a bit of an enigma - lab results ostensibly put me firmly in the Type 2 camp, but my response to treatment is that of a Type 1; I asked about the possibility of a 1.5 diagnosis, but apparently my initial readings make that unlikely, too. She said that my charts have been the topic of discussions among several fellows, just because I don't quite fit neatly into any of the categories. Of all the things to be a unique snowflake about, I could've taken something a little less, you know, medical. Perhaps I'll be Patient X for Diabetes 4.0, or something...   Regardless of my type-quirks, I learned that I'll probably never be able to maintain normal levels without insulin, and that actually didn't freak me out as much as I'd have expected. OK, so I'll be doing the whole MDI thing - possibly venturing into the realm of pumps at some point in the future. And while I completely expect to have a breakdown about this at some future point, today, I'm kind of ok with it. Because I'm feeling a sense of control that I haven't really had in this first month. Getting the reassurance from Katie, et al. that I'm doing what I need to do, managing this disease on a level of "non-diabetic" numbers...I can do this. It's a pain in the *** sometimes, and over the weekend I was utterly heartbroken because I was imagining going the rest of my life without eating another cupcake, but the sun is shining today. I can do this.   And, the best news of all - I got the go ahead to proceed with the IVF plans that were derailed when I got my scary lab results last month. I was hoping and praying that I could get a handle on my blood sugar so that by the beginning of summer we could get back on track with the baby plans, so I was absolutely and utterly shocked that *they* brought it up today...even sent me on my merry way with a permission slip saying that my diabetes is well-controlled.   Next step is a consult a week from today to see what the fertility docs do with this information. I know there's a long road ahead of me, but now, I'm hopeful.

bardowlatry

bardowlatry

 

This Injectable Life: Coverboy

The ADA are doing an article on counting carbs in their April Issue and so I spoke to them for about an hour on how this old diabetic counts carbs.   They must have loved the discussion - as they sent a photographer to my house yesterday for some photos.   What fun!   So when a photographer says we need three photos - it's not like "snap snap snap" and they leave.   There was a truckload of equipment and an assistant in tow.   They set up a white background in my garage and a number of lights and spent about an hour and a half fiddling with lights and taking readings and so fourth. Finally they called me for the shoot.   I have a new appreciation for models. The photographer was great - but they take about 100 or 200 pictures and you have to hold pretty still and in a precise location and get commands like "can you move the top of your head slightly to the right" and "chin down a little."   I'm thinking - right - does he mean turn my head right or look right?   So about four hours later - they all seemed satisfied that they got their shots - and proceeded to spend all this time loading what must have been thousands of dollars of equipment back into their truck.   They will take pictures of three others they spoke to for the article, and one of us will get to be on the cover!     The past few weeks for me D wise have been quite well. I'm about 2 months back on MDI and it's like riding a comfortable bike again.   Initially I had a heck of a time remembering to take the Lantus shot before bed. Fortunatly the sensor would catch that error and beep me awake to correct.

drewgolden

drewgolden

 

About Me T2 Info

A1c: 8.0 (11/22/2010), 5.7 (1/10/2011), 6.1 A1cNow (1/22), 5.1 A1cNow (4/23/2011) Metformin: 500mg(11/26), 250mg(2/1) PGX(.com) fiber 2000mg before lunch & dinner No Exercise (powerchair user, muscular atrophy) Waist: 46" 11/2010, 42" 2/2011 Avoiding starch(carbs), sugar, etc. Guru Authors: Rob Thompson MD, Gary Taubes (Why We Get Fat)   Progress Chart If someone looks at the image above let me know if it displayed OK for you.

RHeitzman

RHeitzman

 

My "Dealing With Type 2" Story

Dealing with Type 2 Diabetes   The following is a post I made on an Internet forum following up on an earlier post about being overweight and being diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes:   I'm down two notches on my belt and my A1C test has gone from 8.0 to 6.0! (A1C is a blood test and 6 is the dividing line between "in-control" and "non-diabetic".) I've been taking the entry level diabetes drug Metformin and have cut my dosage in half and may go off altogether after my next doctor visit.   For those of you that want to explore losing weight I'd recommend PGX http://www.pgx.com/us/en/ as mentioned above (Beat Diabetes Naturally Michael T. Murray) and the book Glycemic Load Diet by Rob Thompson .   If you are up for a little disappointment read Why We Get Fat and What to do about it by Gary Taubes - it explores how wrong the medical community has been about dealing with obesity over the last 40 years (and still is wrong in many cases.) In summary both books wind up endorsing the Atkins approach in general. Basically reduce carbs and sugar to a minimum.   Self Magazine http://www.self.com/fooddiet has a pretty good lookup tool for exploring the Gylcemic Load Index (GLI) of many foods including fast foods outlets. I was surprised to learn how bad my Bran Flakes cereal w/Rice Dream was for my blood sugar levels. My "testing in pairs" (discussed later) confirmed how bad it was.   I purchase an A1C self-test kit (two tests, $40) and ran one after my last A1C lab test and the results was within a reasonable margin of error (5.8 vs. 6.1 on the self test). This test kit is a good way to get a quick insight into your A1C level in my opinion. Of course a discussion with your doctor at your next visit is probably better, especially if a high BMI (body mass index) is a problem for you. The A1C kit should be available at drug stores with a good diabetes section.   If your A1C is high see your doctor about it and ask for a prescription for a blood glucose meter for self testing. I recommend the Accu-Chek Compact Plus (not really compact, one of the largest on the market!) and an Accu-Chek Multi-Clik lancing device. Have the prescription written for testing two times a day initially to make sure you get a good supply of test strips. I recommend the Accu-Chek Compact and a Accu-Chek Multi-Clik lancing device because the devices use a cartridge of 19 test strips and 9 lancing devices instead of tiny individual pieces. These devices are the easiest to use if you are having any dexterity problems. I highly recommend their instructional materials on "testing in pairs" which helps you get a handle on the impact of the meals you eat. You may be surprised at what you can get away with!   Avoid the "free" FreeStyle Lite meter you will see advertised - in my opinion it is not accurate enough - it reads 15-20 points high for me and my son.   You may want to check with your insurance carrier to see if they will cover the Accu-Chek Compact - some of the carriers have restrictions on which brands they fully support.   I feel pretty good about getting my diabetes under control and my weight loss. I intend to keep using the PGX (for fiber if nothing else) and keep paying attention to the GLI of my food choices. I can still stand to drop another two notches on my 44" belt - after which I will run out of notches! I may get some more holes punched just so I can continue to be encourage but my weight loss efforts - here's hoping anyway!

RHeitzman

RHeitzman

 

Does flu or fever raise BG?

Wondering when the high blood sugar level not responding to efforts to lower during same type of illness as 70sFan77, will begin to respond?? It's been a week and it's like there is never going to be a good reading again! Type 2 Diet controlled - in the past - not controlled now! Have not encountered this before since dx in 2004.

michigangirl

michigangirl

 

Water

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars Picture a glass of water. Mix in a little sugar and stir until it dissolves. Now place it outside on a hot, sunny day. As the water evaporates, the remaining water gets sweeter and sweeter.   If you have diabetes, this happens to your blood when you're dehydrated. Because your blood is 83% water, when you lose water, the volume of blood decreases and the sugar remains the same. More concentrated blood sugar means higher blood sugars.   The lesson: stay hydrated to avoid unnecessary high blood sugars.   How Much Water Should I Drink? The average person loses about 10 cups of water per day through sweat and urination. At the same time, you gain fluid from drinking liquids and eating food.   So how much you need to drink is a tricky question. You may have heard the "drink 8 glass of water a day" rule. Where did this rule come from? As Barbara Rolls, a nutrition research at Pennsylvania State University says: "I can't even tell you that, and I've writen a book on water!" It turns out that there's no basis for this in the medical literature.   The easiest way to tell is looking at your urine. If it's a little yellow, you're probably hydrated. If it's darker, then you need to drink more fluids.   You can also go with your own intuition. Are you thirsty? Drink! If you're busy or stuck at a desk for long periods, make sure you have a water bottle so you can easily answer when your body calls for water.   Does Coffee or Tea Count? Yes. Although consuming caffeine can cause your body to shed some water, you still gain more water than you shed. And studies have shown that this effect is partically non-existent for people who drink caffeine regularly.   Can I Drink Too Much Water? Actually, yes. A few years ago, a woman died in a water drinking contest. For the average person, it's more important to guard against under-hydration than over-hydration.

SE7

SE7

 

Diabetes, Depression & Menopause

2/15/11   Today is the first day of my new blog. I need a channel for all the thoughts and feelings that I'm going through with the changes going on.   I started Zoloft 1 week ago. My GYN prescribed it for depression and the mood swings associated with menopause. The first few nights I awoke out of a sound sleep hypo - but I'm not sure if that is a coincidence. I get the "sweats" during the day and just recently started getting "hot flashes" as well. I have regularly woken up at night really hot, but always thought that was diabetes - now I'm not so sure that it wasn't early stages of menopause.   I have had diabetes for 11 years and I am 50 years old. I also have a chronic thyroid disease and take medication for that as well. I was one of those people who took their health for granted and felt invincible. Now, i struggle each and every day to find "normal". I am a recovering alcoholic & drug addict and recently relapsed after 21 years of sobriety. So, you can kind of say that my life got very complicated and I didn't know how to handle it. I am in therapy again and trying to get a handle on me. I want to stop this downward spiral and I am willing to do whatever it takes.   I am starting this daily blog to help cleanse my brain and to hopefully start to see a pattern - of what, I'm not sure.   That's it for today - more to come tomorrow.   2/16/11   Am trying to keep to my word and write a little every day. Fatigue was at all time high today so I drank a lot of coffee. Had really high BG this afternoon - 449! I was told that SSRI's can raise BG levels so I have to make adjustments to my insulin. Not sure if I should cut back my Lantus at night. I don't work with an endo since I have never had any luck finding the right doctor. I always feel like I'm rushed through the appointment or judged for having very little control. I'd like to find a doctor who actually has diabetes - because we all know that unless you have this disease, you can't possibly understand what it feels like every day.   I've always been slim, and never had to diet. I have an endocrine deficiency which is why I developed type 2 diabetes at age 40. I also have a non-functioning thyroid, but don't gain weight. So here I am nearing 51 and still trying to find a balance with all these chronic illnesses. And then to really get slapped in the face, I'm in full menopause. So now it's really tricky to try and figure out which disease is causing a symptom - am I hot because I'm a "hot flash" or because I'm hypo. I am feeling depressed or is my thyroid off kilter.   I try to focus on my blessings - I try to see the glass half full instead of empty - some days it's easier than others.

Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

 

26 Days Diabetic

In the past 26 days, I've: been to 2 hospitals, 2 labs, and 1 other medical office
met with 8 doctors
given myself almost 100 injections
learned that 1 OREO spikes my BS way too much for me to try that again
experienced my first hypo episode right before I had to teach
realized that I prefer insulin injections to the side effects of metformin, though I still have to take both
I have a tendency toward obsession when it comes to challenges. Right now, I'm obsessively testing, tracking what I eat and how it affects my BS, and exercising like a madwoman because I really need to be in control of this condition. My goal for the year is to lose enough weight to make a difference in my medication requirements, and to just get used to being diabetic as just one part of who I am, rather than it being the big major thing always over my head.

bardowlatry

bardowlatry

 

Life two weeks on

:)Hi again, Well it is over 2 weeks since I escaped and I have missed nothing about my old life. Not even my wonderful little farm. I'm sure it helps that I'm staying on a farm and have cows around me. Now it's the buisness end of the whole thing. Once he got over the shock of me actually leaving. H e still can't understand why has no commprehension that his behaviour is not acceptable.He even told someone I was jealous of the dog that is why I left!!! Anyway now his main priority is to get as much out of me that he can. He won't move out (thank goodness for my brother and sister in law letting me stay here) Lets hope things settle fast. The really positive things that this turn in my life has achieved is my relationship with my brother and sister in law has strenghtened.(The saying blood is thicker than water is so true) My weight loss journey is back on track. Lost 6 kilos (12lbs) since Christmas and no it's not just stress I have no junk food in house so can't be tempted. I'm determind to lose next 25kg's by end of year. Also my diabetes is well in control my insulin usage has dropped yet again That feels so good. The other big plus is the friends I have and the support I have recieved That has been my tower of strenght. THANKYOU FOR THIS

alicat61

alicat61

 

Larry Bird and Gordie Howe

Today I read yet another blog about the horrors of hypoglycemic reactions -- of going hypo for you noobs. It was at SixUntilMe and written by a young guest.   I kind of laughed when I read it. On one hand a 23 yr old writing about Larry Bird -- #33 -- seems wrong. Was she watching basketball at age 4? Could she actually remember him? Anyway, that's neither here nor there. I also laughed at her story. Nothing bad happened yet she was scared enough to blog about it. I kept wondering what she might write if she had a "Big One"? Larry Birds are not that bad. I've had Gordie Howes and lived to tell about them, barely. Yes, I remember watching Gordie play hockey. Howes are much worse than Birds. There's contact involved with Howes. If you've ever stumbled around your house in a manic blur throwing body checks into everything and everybody, then you know exactly what I mean. I once took out a painting, a lamp, and put my wife and daughter in danger. Gordie Howe, #9. One of my visits to ER was not for being hypo but to get my foot x-rayed after I did mutiple Beckhams on my bed post. Beckams are #23's   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hE2L69wGMqE   In all seriousness, hypos are all nasty, personified or not. The blogger was out of control and scared. Put this person at the top of stairs or behind the wheel of a car, and you have a truly bad situation. If you are on insulin, it's not so much a matter of if this will happen but when it will happen. It's an inherent danger of being an insulin dependant diabetic. We need to be prepared to handle them, and we need to take extra steps to prevent them. As we so often say in this game -- knowledge is power!   Handling hypos is problematic. Of course we all take those super-sealants off the bottles of glucose tablets before we need them. We also keep our sugar tabs in the exact same place by our bed, a juice is on the top shelf of the fridge, and our family members are taught what to look for and how to treat it. Our coworkers, teammates, and friends as well.   This is all standard stuff, but is it enough? Can we do more? Do we need to do more? Perhaps you are like I was a number of years ago. I had a friend who nodded off all the time. One time she was walking to work in the morning and did a faceplant. She hypo'd as she was walking and never clued in. I considered myself very lucky that I always knew when hypos come on, especially when sleeping. I was glad I wasn't one of those diabetics.   Nine 911's and dozens of Larry Birds and Gordie Howes later, I think I finally caught on that I'm no different from any other insulin dependant diabetic; and neither are you! I can tell you my stories. I can proobably write a book about them. Violence, drama, humor, nudity!   So let's get to the boring stuff -- prevention. How do we make sure we never meet Larry or Gordie? The first step is to understand the situations that cause these events. Unfortuneately I can't tell you all of them. We're all so different in our treatmetns and our lifestyles. I will give you my big three.   Corrections -- I now assume that whenever I need to correct that my control has gone South. It's not on track, and I need to be wary. I don't care the cause of the variance. It really doesn't matter. I know that nearly all of my major hypos were preceded by corrections. There are probably reasons for this, but I'll assume we are simply all bad at math.
 
 
Exercise -- Activity comes in several flavors. I might spend an intense hour playing hockey, I might do a high aerobic night at the gym, or I might spend a hot afternoon in the garden. I've had nasty hypos while golfing, and one of my worst ever happened after planting four large trees. Exercise is great, but it's a trigger for hypos.
 
 
Meal Variations -- Like most IDDs, I follow fairly standard eating patterns. My days look very much alike. But the exceptions can be special! My evening bolus is typically now 6-8 units. For Christmas dinner I bolused 18 units, three times my normal. I didn't have a hypo, but I needed to correct afterwards. I was not in full control. Large meals have caused hypos before, and they will again. We call this the law of small numbers. The more food you eat, the more insulin you take, the more variance you can expect. The potential for error rises.
  This list is not complete for me. If I control all of these, hypos will still happen. I am not a perfectly controlled diabetic, but I am getting close. My last Larry Bird was the second weekend in January, 2010. Not bad for a sub-sixer. But I still drift low now and then, and my mind sometimes forgets to remember that I bolused early and still need to eat. My worst ever hypo happened when I fell asleep in front of the TV after I bolused.   Acknowledging such events, such causes, is not enough. The blogger at SixUntilMe knew she was in danger before she went to bed, but she assumed she'd corrected properly. Assumption is the mother of all screw-ups! Never assume you're in control when you are not. We need to validate it. As an IDD you should know what validation means. If not, tell me what your blood sugar is right now. Validate it. Test, don't guess!   "But It's midnight and I need to get up in six hours. I have a mid-term in the morning!" Too bad, so sad. Would you rather wake up dead? When I am presented with a hypo triggering event, I go into Red Alert status. Nothing takes precedence over monitoring my blood sugars. However, like all diabetics, I try not to sacrifice my life for the disease. If I'm tired, I'll sleep. If I'm due to play hockey, I will. If it's time for Easter Supper, I'm there! But I'm still on red alert. If I go to sleep, I set multiple alarms. I won't go beyond two hours, and I tell my wife to treat me as hypo if I don't wake up. I've set two alarms for each of 2am and 4am before. Yes my wife complained, until I told her how much fun it is to treat me for a hypo. I've also stayed up half the night monitoring. If I'm going to play hockey, a Pepsi and a Snickers defers the problem until after the game, but I have taken my meter on the bench with my Gatorade.   So yes, all of us IDDs can expect Larry Birds and Gordie Howes, those hypoglycemic events where we are out of control and are wandering around like a bull in a china shop. We can take some steps to make sure we can treat them, but we really need to learn what activities or states cause them and go into a state of high alert to make sure they don't take us out of the game. Trust me please, they will happen to you! It's only a matter of time.

xMenace

xMenace

 

Diabetes Associations

I read a number of diabetes blogs, articles, and forums. I try to stay in touch with what's what. So far learning as much as I can, debating and sharing with other diabetics, and really thinking about what's what has worked for me. This morning I saw 224 lbs for the first time since 1992; my last randon BP was 102/68; my A1C is up to 6.0 but has been very good the last four years; and my retinopathy has taken a vacation -- zero signs of damage for the last almost three years.   I did not get here by listening to my doctors, diabetic educators, dieticians, or pharmacists. I did not get here with any help whatsoever by the Canadian Diabetes Association. I got here because I listened to you, all you crazy, rebellious diabetics out there. And I am not alone. Every day I see stories of people gaining control over their conditions. I see weight falling off, I see meds being thrown away, and I see people becoming vibrant once again -- I see people getting healthy.   I read many rants against this team that is supposed to be there for us. Doctors are out of touch, my DE has no time for me, and my food advisor wants me to eat more carbs. I'm getting fat and taking more meds, and all they can say is it's normal. Pfft! I hear these stories a lot. I also read more targeted rants about the ADA (CDA or your-DA). Yesterday a blog slammed them for taking $19 million from Big Pharma. How can they work for me if they have this big funding source they need to protect? Valid complaints all.   My personal history with the CDA goes back to 1975. They supplied me with lots of diabetes literature. My health care team all used CDA literature. I started getting monthly newsletters -- "Diabetes Dialogue." It had stories from other diabetics and of course recipes we never made. They now have an extensive website with numerous portals for patients, volunteers, and professionals. They continue to push information. I suppose if a kindergertener examined what they've done over their lifespan, they'd have to conclude that they are a publishing house.   I made some interesting contact with them a few years ago. It was after I joined DF. I was helping organize a diabetes support group at a local downtown church. We has about a dozen interested patients, a church nurse, and a CDA rep. Everything was going great until the CDA rep told us what we couldn't talk about. Couldn't talk about? No, we couldn't discuss anything that could be deemed medication or treatment. That had to be discussed with doctors and only doctors. Diet then? No, that is treatment. It can only be discussed with dieticians. And we can't talk adjustments for exercise or stress? No, only a diabetes educator can talk about that. Apparantly doctors, dieticians, and DEs are interchangeable.   I had no idea what we were going to talk about. The church lady hung around for almost two years, so we couldn't swing freely. We did bring in a number of speakers though. That was fun and interesting. Mostly useless for day-to-day control though. Finally she buggered off and we could talk freely. And we did. It didn't help much though. A very obese and sick type 2 diabetic can't be making any changes in their regimens without consulting all the specialists first. You just can't do that.   I saw a post recently on a forum where a user was looking for a Canadian Diabetes Forum. That got me thinking whether there were any. I checked the extensive publishing empire of the CDA and wasn't dissapointed. They don't have one. Then the little devil inside me took over. I decided to ask them why not.   Here's what they said. "Unfortunately we do not run a forum due to the complexities of tracking correspondences between individuals." Wow. It is too complex to track correspondence between individuals. Of course it is. Nobody but the CIA does it, not even Linda and Tony *ka-bam* But the real question is why? Why would they even want to track correspondence. Oh yea, I forgot, they don't want us talking about medications or treatment. We aren't qualified for that. Nevermind I live with this disease 24/7/365. Nevermind I make life and death decisions about every four hours of my existence. Nevermind 80% of us will die of heart disease. Nevermind I'm at high risk of blindness, amputation, kidney failure, nerve damage, cancer, alzheimers, and probably every other ****ing western disease out there. I can't be discussing medications or treatment!   They went on to say "Thereby we recommend Diabetes Education Centers, which are staffed by health care professionals such as Certified Diabetes Educators and Dieticians and may also employ other professionals such as social workers, Podiatrists, pharmacist and physiotherapists." Then they gave me a list of choices. Hello? I wasn't asking for help. I was asking a simple question" why don't you have a ****ing forum?   Do I need to say I was a little upset? Do I really need to say what I think of them? I wrote back with a three paragraph letter. I suggested they visit diabetesforums.com to see how real diabetics get better. I said some more too, but I was nice. At least I tried to sound nice. He double-hockey sticks, I don't really care if I pissed them off.   So where does this lead us. What's the real problem here? When faced with such an issue, I typically put on my consulting hat. A consultant wants to know two things: what's happening and what should be happening.   What should be happening. This is always tough. It's often based on opinion. But lets start with some facts. We diabetics are sick people. We really are. And our lives are not easy. I've already identified challenges, and we already know I make life critical decisions every day of my life. Am I not the most important person in the hierarchy? Ask who should be put on the pedestal. Who is the person or group who's needs override all others? What are those person's needs?   I need information. Knowledge is power. I need to know all the possible techniques, treatments, and options. And I need to know why they work or do not work. WHEN I make my life decision of the morning, I realy do NEED to be in charge. I need to be free to act, and I need the entire medical, nutritional, and adminsitrative communities of my health care teams and industries behind me. I need the ****ing odds in my favor!   Will I make mistakes? Of course. Could I die? Yes. Could I take out a village? Possibly. But that decision is going to be made with or without your help. Don't you think it might be wise to get me as much information as possible?   So what's happening. There seems to be an overriding concern that I might screw up if I get too many ideas in my head; afterall, I'm not a trained physician. I can't reliably spew out all 78 pages of the diabetes treatment guidelines with footnotes and references. It's too dangerous to trust me. Therefore, give John a confined set of options. Make him eat these foods. Make him take these medications at these times. Make him do this, that, and those other things. It may not be great treatment, but if he does what he's told, he'll be better than most.   And of course the CDA, the dietician, the DE, and the doctor will have warm arses because theirs are covered with the thickest layer of bull****.   What I see them doing is putting a standard set of treatments on the pedestal all held up by the health care professionals. This is what counts. This is the end all and be all. This is what diabetics across the country NEED to strive for. Nothing else will do.   And what happens of course is that most follow this light in the dark. They walk blindly along the road trusting that no car will come along and take them out. This light will guide them. Then there's those like me that have found the light insufficient. I've stepped in too many potholes and stumbled into too many ditches. Finally I hit my head enough in the darkness that I sought a better light. Then there's those of you who see the problem from the start. I'm very envious of those who saw right away the folly of this light and sought another.   Where do we go from here? In my opinion, the CDA needs to put me on top of their pedestal. They need to try and hold me up there. Stop worrying about whether I'll fall. We all need to be able to fail, and we need to be able to fail on our own. Open up the doors to discussion and debate. Open the doors to an exchange of ideas. Encourage us to try new things. Whatever that ends up being, it's better than getting fat, having your legs lopped off, and dying in a corner from a failed heart at too young an age.   I now march with my own light.

xMenace

xMenace

 

new to this site and the pump

i have a silly question i want to use the ez manager cd but my laptop does not have a cd rom how the heck can i do this u cant download from the site? i really want to use this with my meter so i dont have to manually put in how many carbs im eating any ideas

roxanneisfly

roxanneisfly

 

New to this site ...

Hi. I am new to this site but and not new to diabetes. I have been diabetic for 32 years on insulin at age 13. I am trying to navigate this site and cannot see how to upload my profile picture. Can someone please help me?   Thanks, Judi Naylor Paul;)

Judi Paul Bear

Judi Paul Bear

 

New to Diabetes, and DF

I just ran across this web sight and was suprised to see all the friendly people here! I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in january of 2009, the middle of my junior year in high school.Suddenly it seemed that my whole world stopped...Im still sorta new to all this two years into it, but I guess I havent really been exposed to anyone else with type 1 in my area...I am so intrigued by what I'm reading as far as complications you all are having, and how many things I can relate to!.well, I just wanted to kinda introduce myself

misscatherine92

misscatherine92

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