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Coming Home

My project in Newfoundland is done, I fly home tonight.   Project is a success. The work was pretty easy though. It wasn't very stressful at all. The most stressfull part was looking for work on several days.   I don't feel like writing much, so I'll point form things:   - took bus for first 8 weeks; then the bus strike Nov 4 forced me to rent a car. Bosses won't be happy, but pfft. - Hurricane Igor was fun, really. I'm now impressed with hurricanes. - Wrote a novel. It's not done, not even close, but I won NaNoWriMo by writing 52265 words in November. I met some fine young writers in the process. - I also met some fine old writers including Mirriam Toews who was here for a reading at The Ship Pub. - I fell in love with the city of St. John's Newfoundland. It's a happening place. - I hate hotel beds. I'm going to sleep all day tomorrow. - Met a fine endocrinologist, Dr. Carol Joyce who does some cool research with pumpers. All her pumpers basal test and have at least eight different rates. We partially agree on diet. She'll change - Diabetes is rampant here, highest T1 rates in Canada. - Never saw a moose, but heard warnings about them on the TCH nearly every morning. - One heck of a city to drive in. It is not built on a grid! - Snowed three times. While Toronto got three feet in one day, we got a bit of rain. It rains every day here at some point. I never saw any frost. Weather was gorgeous. Bring on global warming! - Sugars were mostly great. Current 14 day avg = 6.1. I'm sure there was at least one bad day in there with a bad set. NO BAD HYPOS! I did go through half a bottle of dex 4's. I seem to remember a 3.3 mmol/l (59). I was 3.5 (63) last night 2hrs after dinner. No sleeping hypos! - Got a modest travel bonus and free food and gas for 90 days. My wallet is a little happier. - Daughter moved home and wife had the bathroom and master bedroom re-done. - My new computer parts are waiting for me! Athlon 1090T 6 core, modest yet great for BOINCing. - Being one of the first in North America to see the sun each day is kind of weird feeling. - Did a little sight seeing. Pics below.   Cape Spear. Can't walk any furrther east than this. Hi Dave, Azz, and everyone else out there!   Cape Spear   View of St. John's. Mile One is the arena. The big building on top is The Rooms   More city

xMenace

xMenace

 

A little about me

G'day fellow pin cushions!   Seeing as this is my first blog I figured I should tell you all a little about me. That way we can all feel like friends as once we feel like friends we can talk about all the things we're too afraid to talk about in person.   So to start off, I'm a 21 year old student from Ontario, Canada. I was diagnosed when I was 16, a week to the day after my 16th birthday (thankfully i got to enjoy my birthday cake). It was a **** of a shock to myself and my mom (although she says she knew the whole time, thanks for the heads up eh mom!). Anyways, so I went to the doctors and they tested my sugar and said I was 25.7 I was then given a pee cup and told to pee, pretty embarassing for a 16 year old girl (i know there are others like me out there who would rather give blood then pee in a cup). To make matters worse, when I came out of the bathroom toting my cup o'pee i ran right into a very good looking police officer (cue the awkwardness and flushed cheeks). So for the following 3 days i was on lockdown within the hospital, they wouldnt let me go outside for a walk for fear I would faint.. I pretty much had to bribe a nurse for me just to stand outside. So after I was released from the hospital I was sent down to a larger hospital where I endured 4 days of intense training. At this training I was interviewed by a resident doctor who, in the presence of my mom and my aunt, proceeded to ask me if I was lactating. I guess he was trying to ask if I was pregnant and thought, you know instead of asking her if she's pregnant I'll be sly and ask if she's lactating. So when i gave him a shocked, blank state he then interpreted that as I didn't know what lactating was and went on to describe it.. most embarassing moment!   So now that you know a little about how/when I was diagnosed I'll just give you a brief insight into what who I am now. I am just finishing my last year of University and am planning on applying to the RCMP (for those of you not from Canada, the RCMP stands for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, our national police force).   so I hope you come back and read more of my blogs. I'm going to be talking about the issues that no one likes to talk about (relationships, careers, futures, hopes dreams, fears) you name i'll talk about it.   Embrace your inner pin cushion!

the optimist

the optimist

 

"D" is Driving me Nuts

I did discover an American cheese I was using had 2 carbs per slice. That was taking my breakfast carbs to over 30. I am finding if I go over 25 carbs per meal I run into trouble. I also think the glimiperided may not be as effective over night. My doctor has me taking much less in the evening than in the morning so I am thinking that may be a problem. I will continue to monitor and really count the carbs more closely. Slippery thanks for the encouraging words. I appreciate it.

sweetstar

sweetstar

 

hypoglycemia

I forgot to mention that I am not on any diabetes medications, or any other medications, that would lower blood sugar. I was diagnosed with type 2 several years ago   Thanks! Sharon

sherman125

sherman125

 

Hypoglycemia

I have been experiencing low blood sugar (in the 40's) after eating breakfast. My doctor recently ordered a fasting insulin and C-Peptide. The results were: insulin 35 uIU/ml (normal is under 17). C-Peptide was 4 ng/ml (normal is .8-3.1). My random glucose was 64. The doctor referred me to an endocrinologist, who said that I didn't meet the criteria to be seen...no explanation. I read online that high insulin and C-Peptide, and low blood glucose could indicate a tumor on the pancreas (insulinoma). Does any one have additional information or advise?   Thank you. Sharon

sherman125

sherman125

 

insulin info request to Lilly

Eli Lilly, December 1, 2010   Since this email contact came up when I tried to contact Lilly as to my right to thoroughly understand what drug effects I may be shooting up, please allow me to express. I am very concerned about the meta-cresol and phenol preservatives and other possible synthetic GMO chemicals in Lilly insulin that I shoot up many times each day. Has a natural preservative even been considered, like citrus?   As a consumer of your insulin, I wished to explore Humulin NPH as an alternative to Sanofi Aventis Lantus and contacted LillyHasAllTheAnswersCenter. I was rehearsedly told I would have to receive any info through my doctor. As a patient, who only seeks education as to what I put in my body daily...I was NOT allowed access to information and therefore the ability to decide, for myself.   I DO NOT want filtered, diluted and manipulated information from any outside source. That is why I requested info directly from Lilly, the insulin maker. I can easily find requested info about Lantus, from Sanofi Aventis or NovoNordisk.   So what is going on with info about Humulin N? Are lawyers ruling Lilly's business now even more? Your "Answer Center" restricted my access, carefully pacifying me with no answers. Why? Lilly spokesperson mentioned, we must keep our "formula" secret. This is not some game, this is about lives. I am trying to protect my health here and need info to make wise decisions. Would you not want the ability to decide for yourself and your family?   Is not health Lilly's and other Pharmaceutical Industry’s priority?   WHY ALL THE GLYCEROL? IS IT TOXIC, LONG TERM? I need to know, all your consumers need to know and they have that right. Correct? It makes us suspect something is being hidden?   DO WE REALLY KNOW THE EFFECTS OF GMO INSULIN, LONG TERM? GMO FOODS ARE NOW DESTROYING OUR HEALTH. IS IT THE SAME WITH GMO INSULINS? I need to know. I really want my porcine insulin back. Sadly, natural insulins have been run out of the market with these cheap synthetic questionable insulins.   Health above profit? With all this medical intervention, we remain the sickest nation on earth with grotesquely profitable epidemics of heart, cancer and diabetes. Where is the emphasis on prevention, where is that "cure"? I gladly take far less insulin eating no sugar and white flour. Why does Lilly's "source of info doctors" never reveal this lifesaving info?   M-CRESOL IS RATED "POSSIBLE CARCINOGEN" BY FDA. IS THERE REALLY NOT A SAFER PRESERVATIVE? HOW DOES LILLY REALLY KNOW THE SIDE EFFECTS LONG TERM, why not just use something safer?   Is Lilly so set in their "secret formula" they are willing to risk short term monetary gain for us dying diabetics? What will true research reveal about long term use of PHENOL?   Sad state of our nation, with the drug pushers, pushing their drugs for mere profit not health. Sorry, we are dying needlessly here…   If drugs are needed, let's join together to make SURE their benefits outweigh their risks. Health first. Blessings to all. Please send along email with needed answers.

bonnigrrl

bonnigrrl

 

hello all :)

my name is erica and im new to this site! i need all the help i can get right now. im farely new to this diabetes thing. diagnosed in may right after my 21st birthday and im still learning things everyday. i have joined this forum because i need people to talk to that can relate to me and how i am feeling.   thanks:)

bigmamablue89

bigmamablue89

 

exercise update

Now it has been about 6 weeks since I started my exercise program. I have lost about 6.5 pounds so far. I am going to the gym about 4-5 times a week. Typically doing cardio and weights. I am a little more focused on the cardio right now. I want to try and get under 200 pounds. I am at around 211 right now. I have gotten frustrated at how long it is taking to lose the weight. I have gone in and tried different elliptical machines this week to see which one I like the most. I tried two of the new machines. Our gym recently purchases several new machines. I think the one I started with so far is still my favorite. I like it because it has a smooth motion to it and it is solid, so I don't feel like I am going to fall off it or tip the thing over.

jsimms435

jsimms435

 

Low blood sugar

I am new here first day. I was diagnosed Type 16 months ago with an aic of 15 and a fasting glucose of 500. I take Lantus 10 units and novolog 1 unit per 20 carbs. The problem lately without novolog I am falling to about 37 daily and if I eat carbs I go high maybe 200 but then even without novolog I will fall out. I am not sure what is happening and I lost my health insurance any advice??? I am afraid to take the novolog but without it I do go high.

holli

holli

 

Type 1 TTC

Hello I'm kinda new here I was wondering what you all fell on A1C levels before conception. I am having trouble getting mine below 7 It's frustrating because we are ready and feel that we have been waiting so long, but my endo "discourages" TTC until i'm as close to 6 as possible. I feel like i'm never going to get there and dont want to wait forever! Just frustrated I guess and need some venting....most of our family and friends just don't get it

sisal7684

sisal7684

 

Cell Phone Case is Much better than Minimed's Pump holster!

,Yes it is true, I now use a cell phone case with velcro closure because the magnet on the other 2 cases did mess up my insulin pump. Could not figure it out then I fully read all info and precautions in the books that my diabetes educator had given me on insulin pump therapy and there it was in black and white.

ruffusb99

ruffusb99

 

confused

I am 47 years old and had gestational diabetes 15 years ago lately i have not felt well so I started testing my bg in the mornings it is fine about 99 after a small lunch it will rise and then drop 2 hours later which I understand is normal but 4 hours later it is anything between 7.8 or 13.6 could somebody please explain to me why this is if i have not eaten how it can go so high i am slim exept for my stomach. Thank You to anybody who can help. PS my fasting bg came back fine as I knew it would.

irenej

irenej

 

Hi

This is ending my third week of exercise. I have gone to the gym about 5 times this week either to do weights or cardio. The big change that I have seen is that I have more energy. I actually look forward to going to the gym after work. I don't feel like I just want to take a nap all the time. I did have a bad day last week when my blood sugar just would not come down. It stayed around 300 most of the day. I'm not sure what was happening there. This morning my blood sugar was 100, The mornings before that were Friday 104, Thursday 75, Wednesday 72, Tuesday 89, Monday 104, 164 on Sunday. I have split the Lantus that I was taking to 16 in the morning and 16 in the evening before bed. If I have a problem time it appears to be in the evening and that is why the Lantus was split. Also, I was dropping in the middle of the night quite often. Overall, I am taking 8 less units a day of Lantus since starting to exercise. Overall, feeling better is great, but I would like to lose weight also and that doesn't appear to be happening. Maybe a pound or two, but not much more than that. I have to try and be patient which is difficult for me since I am not good at waiting.

jsimms435

jsimms435

 

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a physical disorder involving the pancrease, a gland which produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts to regulate the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Insulin lowers the blood glucose (sugar) level and promotes transport and entry of glucose into the muscle cells and other tissues for their energy needs and into the liver and fat cells for storage. Inadequate secretion of insulin causes elevated blood sugar and lipid levels. What is the result? Some common symptoms of DM - excessive thirst and hunger. As the disease progresses the body's inability to store or use glucose cause weight loss and fatigue. Another common symptom that is often overlooked is blurred vision. DM affects about 16 million Americans, yet perhaps only half of them know they have it. Often those with the most common type of diabetes (type 2), which tend to show up in older adults, confuse their symptoms with aging or being overweight. As a result, they don't get the treatment they need. Left untreated, diabetes can cause serious problems, including an increased risk of stroke and heart attack, blindness, kidney trouble, nerve damage, and amputation (loss) of limbs due to circulatory problems. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1, also know as juvenile appears early in life - 14 years of age or younger - when the pancrease stops working. Type 2 occurs later in life. About 90 percent of diabetics have type II diabetes, which results when the muscles become resistant to insulin, even though the body may be producing enough. Is there a cure for diabetes melitus? No, but both types can be managed well with a combination of drugs, exercise, a well-balanced, healthy diet and monitoring of blood sugar levels. What should you do if you suspect you might have diabetes? See your doctor and follow his or her advice. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a physical disorder involving the pancrease, a gland which produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts to regulate the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Insulin lowers the blood glucose (sugar) level and promotes transport and entry of glucose into the muscle cells and other tissues for their energy needs and into the liver and fat cells for storage. Inadequate secretion of insulin causes elevated blood sugar and lipid levels. What is the result? Some common symptoms of DM - excessive thirst and hunger. As the disease progresses the body's inability to store or use glucose cause weight loss and fatigue. Another common symptom that is often overlooked is blurred vision. DM affects about 16 million Americans, yet perhaps only half of them know they have it. Often those with the most common type of diabetes (type 2), which tend to show up in older adults, confuse their symptoms with aging or being overweight. As a result, they don't get the treatment they need. Left untreated, diabetes can cause serious problems, including an increased risk of stroke and heart attack, blindness, kidney trouble, nerve damage, and amputation (loss) of limbs due to circulatory problems. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1, also know as juvenile appears early in life - 14 years of age or younger - when the pancrease stops working. Type 2 occurs later in life. About 90 percent of diabetics have type II diabetes, which results when the muscles become resistant to insulin, even though the body may be producing enough. Is there a cure for diabetes mellitus? No, but both types can be managed well with a combination of drugs, exercise, a well-balanced, healthy diet and monitoring of blood sugar levels. What should you do if you suspect you might have diabetes? See your doctor and follow his or her advice.

TRM

TRM

 

Successful Living With Diabetes Type 2

Living successfully with diabetes is what I've learned to do since my diagnosis in 2008. At the age of 45, I was diagnosed with new onset Type 2 Diabetes. What is Type 2 diabetes? Normally cells in the pancreas release proper amounts of insulin. This helps sugar enter into cells throughout the body for energy. One main problem of type 2 diabetes is the “resistance” of cells to insulin. In other words, it takes more insulin to produce the same effect. In addition, people with type 2 diabetes do not make enough insulin for what their body needs. Type 2 diabetes is not just a problem of blood sugars. It also affects blood pressure, cholesterol, and fats, inflammation in the body, and blood clotting. Type 2 diabetes can run in families as it does in mine. My maternal grandmother (my mother's mom) is 92 years old and has lived with diabetes for many years. This disease is often seen in the overweight. The tie-in with obesity comes from the fact that there is higher “resistance” to insulin with higher body weight. Were there early warning signs I missed? Yes, they are as follows: Dry mouth
Fatigue
Frequent urination
Increased thirst
Mood swings or irritability
Unexplained weight loss
Blurred vision
Detecting diabetes early on can reduce the risk of developing kidney disease, and eye damage. Please learn the early warning signs of diabetes and notify your physician if you suspect you may have diabetes. Has my life changed since being diagnosed with diabetes? Yes. Prior to being diagnosed, I lived a fairly normal life. When I say fairly normal, I mean I was married, worked in the private sector till I was laid off, exercised only occasionally, and ate what I wanted without thinking what I might be doing to my body. Following being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I had to make changes to my lifestyle, which include routine exercise, 30 minutes a day and controlled diet. I choose to walk at a moderate pace for my exercise 30 minutes a day. I eat 3 meals plus a snack, watching the number of carbohydrates I consume. In addition I check my blood sugar at least twice a day. Through exercise, eating healthier, and prayer, my diabetes is currently controlled without the use of any medication. I am grateful to God for helping me thus far. Why? When I was first diagnosed, my blood sugar level was over 400. My doctor at the time thought I would be on insulin for the rest of my life. The only time I was on insulin was when I was in the hospital. I have done much research on diabetes since being diagnosed and have learned that 20 million people in the United State have it. Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the USA and is increasing in children and young adults. Who are some of the people living successfully with diabetes? Brett Michaels – Musician
Missy Fox – Professional Marathon Runner
Gary Hall, Jr. - U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist – Swimming
Mike Echols – NFL – Tennessee Titans
Scott Coleman – Swimmer
Edward James Olmos – Actor (Admiral Adama on “Battlestar
Gallactica”)
Patti LaBelle – Singer
Arthur Ashe – Professional Tennis Player
In future articles, I will discuss complications of diabetes and how they can be avoided, diet, and how to develop an exercise program. Also, I will share with you more individuals who live successfully with diabetes. Please continue to follow my articles to learn more about diabetes. Remember: Successful Living With Diabetes is possible.

TRM

TRM

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