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Strive to Keep Your HBA1c Glucose Levels at Normal Levels - 4.2% - 4.9% (70-97 ml/dl)

To avoid diabetic or prediabetic complications, it makes sense to keep your HBA1c levels as near to that of a normal person as possible. By doing this, diabetics and prediabetics can avoid or minimize the various complications that plague diabetics. For type 2 diabetics, this would mean that they would have to work at losing weight especially belly fat, use areobic exercise, do weight lifting, control their diet (low carb/high protien), and finally if necessary use basel and bolus insulin to bring their blood glucose levels down to the HBA1c range of 4.2% - 4.9%. Note: Insulin has proven to be the only way to really control blood glucose levels for the type of control that is required to normalize blood glucose levels. While there are many oral medications, most of these do not lower glucose levels to that of a normal person better than insulin. Testing with a meter should be done at least 8 times a day by a type 2 to insure this type of control and to alert the person that their blood levels are not too high or too low but within the 'normal' HBA1c range or 4.2% - 4.9% (70-97 ml/dl). Type 1 diabetics can also strive for and meet this goal as it is as important for them to maintain normalized blood sugars as all others. While their are many differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetics, getting normal blood sugar levels should be a goal of all diabetics and prediabetics, an HBA1c range or 4.2% - 4.9% (70-97 ml/dl).

healthsage

healthsage

 

Are These 7 Heart Disease Causes Part of Your Daily Life?

If they are, try to do something about them, especially if you have diabetes. Sometimes we become apprehensive, and with good reason, about those frightening signs that may announce a heart attack. But, are we equally concerned about the heart disease causes that can lead to a heart attack?   Knowing the causes is the first step towards preventing heart disease. Let us review them just in case one or more are part of your daily life so you can take some action to eliminate them.   1. You smoke   Smoking is one of the main causes of heart disease. The risk of dying of heart failure is about four times higher in people who smoke than in those who don’t smoke. Many of us are under the impression that the major danger from smoking is cancer but that is not quite true; smoking is the major risk factor for heart failure and strokes. In fact, about 40% of deaths caused by cardiovascular disease are due to smoking.   Smoking contributes to heart failure and strokes in the following manner:   1. Increases blood pressure and the risk for heart attacks and strokes. 2.The carcinogen components in tobacco damage the walls of the arteries. 3. The carbon monoxide from the burning of the tobacco interferes with the blood capacity to carry oxygen to our heart. 4. Smoking causes the narrowing of the blood vessels that carry blood to our legs and arms.   I know that to stop smoking is not a piece of cake but you have to make an effort. If you try, I am confident you’ll succeed. Be strong! Look for professional help to assist you in this task. And don’t get discourage if you have already tried and didn’t make it. Try as many times as you can.   2. You don’t walk For years, health professionals have examined the association between physical activity and heart attack. The findings consistently reveal that people who are physically active have half the risk for heart attacks than people who are not active. Those studies show also that at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, on most days of the week, is sufficient to reduce the risk of a heart disease.   Keep in mind that the heart is a muscle, and like any other muscle in the body, it becomes stronger the more you exercise it. Without exercise, it loses muscle fibers and becomes weak until it is unable to do its job. And the last thing you need is a heart that can’t do its job.   The direct effects of physical activity on heart disease are:   1. Walking strengthens the heart so it can pump more blood with fewer beats 2. Lowers blood pressure by increasing the diameter of the coronary arteries. 3. Lowers “LDL”, the bad cholesterol 4. Increases “HDL”, the “good” cholesterol 5. Decreases triglycerides 6. Decreases the risk of diabetes, which is a risk for heart attacks   3. You eat too much saturated fat   There is a reason why health authorities advise us to limit the consumption of saturated fat:   1. Saturated fat clogs your arteries. It is the most rigid of all fats and is solid at room temperature. Solid fats are hard to dissolve and can easily get stuck in your arteries.   2. Saturated fat causes the liver to overproduce cholesterol. The liver makes about 75 percent of the cholesterol your body needs from internal sources, while the remaining 25 percent comes from food. But when you eat too much saturated fat, your liver keeps producing cholesterol and you end up with much more cholesterol than you need. Limit saturated fat consumption to less than 10 percent of the total calories ingested per day.   4. You eat too many foods containing hydrogenated oils or trans fats Here is another health failure causes. Health authorities are concerned that the consumption of trans fats might have contributed to the 20th century epidemic of coronary heart disease. Hydrogenated oils or trans fats as they are usually called, are produced artificially by inserting molecules of hydrogen in vegetable oils, a process called hydrogenation. Through this process, the oil, which is liquid at room temperature, changes its original form and becomes solid. In other words, it becomes saturated fat.   Trans fats destroy our body cells because the unnatural shapes of these fats cause our cells to become malformed and to malfunction. And that includes the cells of the heart and the arteries. Read the food label and avoid products which contain trans fats or hydrogenated fats.   Example of foods that contain these harmful fats are:   1. Industrial bakery such as cookies, donuts, croissants, cakes, and the like 2. Solid margarine 3. Fried fast food   5. You don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables   Not eating adequate amount of fruits and vegetables is one of the main heart failure causes. We know by experience and research that people who consume plant foods regularly have a lower incidence of heart failure and strokes than those who do not include them in their diet.   Fruits and vegetables contain phytochemicals, non-nutritive chemicals found in plant foods that protect their host plants from infections and microbial invasions. Recently, however, we have learned that phytochemicals are also crucial in protecting humans against many diseases, including heart disease.   Among the functions phytochemicals perform in our bodies are:   1. They act as antioxidants 2. They keep the walls of small blood vessels healthy 3. They make our small blood vessels stronger 4. They prevent platelets from becoming sticky and piling up 5, They block specific enzymes that raise blood pressure. Include about 9 portions of fruits and vegetables a day as part of a healthy diet.   6. You have too much stress   Have you ever felt strong headaches, muscle pain, anxiety, insomnia, and tiredness? If you identify yourself with some of these symptoms, your body may be going through an excess of tension. Nowadays, 80 percent of the population suffers from some kind of symptoms caused by stress which many times end up in illnesses such as high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart attacks.   Trying to cover on a daily basis more tasks than you physically can handle may be one of the major contributors to your stress. It could be that one of the reasons why you succumb to disease easily is the level of stress in your life since tension reduces your capacity of adaptation to your environment. You need to learn how to surround yourself with peace and serenity.   7. You drink too much alcohol   Avoid high alcohol consumption. Five to seven percent of the hypertension we see in people is due to high alcohol intake. The Health World Organization estimates that almost 2/3 of strokes and 50 percent of heart attacks are caused by high pressure. Limit your alcohol intake to two small glasses of wine a day if you are a male and one small glass a day if you are a female. Final thoughts on heart disease causes   If you make an effort to implement a healthy diet in your life, you will reduce or eliminate many heart disease causes. And the beauty of it is that you won’t be part of the yearly American Heart Association’s statistics of deaths occurred by heart failures or strokes.   To your heart health!   Emilia Klapp, RD, BS The Diabetes Club - Overcoming Diabetes with Nutrition, with Diabetes and Weight Loss Coach - Emilia Klapp

EmiliaK

EmiliaK

 

Fish Omega 3 Reduces Risk of Repeat Heart Attacks by 45%

Interest in fish omega 3 fats as a source of protein has skyrocketed in recent years after it has been observed that people living in regions bordering the Mediterranean Sea appear to live longer and suffer less from heart attacks.   But whether or not this diet can benefit patients who have already suffered a heart attack has not been tested in depth before the GISSI study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fish and its omega 3 oils on cardiovascular events after people have had a heart attack.   Who forms the GISSI study group?   GISSI, an Italian group for the study of the survival of Heart Attacks (Myocardial Infarction) is an influential cardiology research group founded as a collaboration between two Italian organizations – The Mario Negri Institute and The Associazione Nazionale dei Medici Cardiologi Ospedalieri (ANMCO)   The trials carried out by GISSI have obtained wide recognition in the international world of cardiology and are considered a methodological landmark. Four large-scale clinical trials over the past 20 years (GISSI 1, GISSI 2, GISSI 3, GISSI Prevention) have involved more than 60,000 patients with acute myocardial infarction.   The GISSI study   Between October 1993 to September 1995, 11,324 patients participated in the GISSI trial. To qualify as a participant for the study, the patients must have survived a recent heart attack (less than three months prior to being enrolled in the study). Patients were randomly assigned to four treatment groups:   Group 1- Patients received 1 gram of fish oil containing 85% of Eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, and Docosahexaenoic acid, DHA .   Group 2- Patients received 300 mg of vitamin E, a synthetic a-tocopherol supplement.   Group 3- Patients received a combination of omega-3 and vitamin E   Group 4- Control group, patients did not receive treatment   The results were very significant for dietary supplementation with omega-3s from fish oil. Treatment with omega-3s resulted in a 45% reduction in the risk of having a sudden fatal heart attack, a 30% decrease from cardiovascular mortality and a 20% reduction in overall mortality. According to the researchers, Vitamin E supplements were found to have no benefits on heart attacks.   Marchioli, senior author of the study, reported that the people who followed a Mediterranean style diet that included more vegetables, fruit, fish, but little butter, were less likely to die than people who reported eating higher amounts of butter, cheese, and vegetable oils other than olive oil.   Similar benefits of a Mediterranean-style diet were seen in earlier, smaller randomized trials. In the Lyon Diet Heart Study, benefits were seen in patients who after a heart attack were assigned to a diet rich in [alpha]-linoleic acid, ALA, from plant sources along with plenty of legumes, cereals, fresh fruits, and vegetables.   Compared with those assigned to a “prudent” diet similar to the American Heart Association step 1 diet, those on the Mediterranean style diet had a 70% reduction in deaths, repeat heart attacks, unstable angina, stroke, congestive heart failure, or embolic events.   Where do you find EPA and DHA?   Long-chain fish oil 3, EPA and DHA, are most abundant in fish and shellfish, particularly fatty fish such as salmon, rainbow trout, tuna, mackerel, herring, and sardines. All seafood has some EPA and DHA. Fish oil vitamins are a rich source of EPA and DHA, too.   How much Fish Oil 3 do you need to take?   100 grams (3.5 ounces) of salmon provide 5,000 mg (5 grams) of EPA and DHA, followed by tuna with about 2,300 mg and trout with 1,470 mg. Other fish with high content of fish oil 3 are sardines, mackerel, and anchovies. A daily ingest should contribute between 1.1 and 1.4 grams. A fatty fish portion will cover this need. For people who already have a heart condition, eating seafood more often, or consuming marine from fish oil 3 vitamins, is just as important. If you have already suffered a heart attack, you could supplement your fish intake with a good quality fish oil vitamin.   Are Plant and Fish Omega 3 born equal?   No. The omega 3 oils found in terrestrial plants, such as some nuts, or the ones found in enriched foods, are ALA.. This omega 3 oil has some, but not all, of the health benefits associated with fish oil 3. It can also be converted in the body to EPA and very small amounts of DHA but humans perform this conversion very poorly, less than 5%, so relying only on ALA for all fish oil 3, puts you at risk of having a deficiency in EPA and especially in DHA   And don’t forget that…   Our body either cannot produce fish oil 3 or does not produce enough quantities to support good health. Therefore, we have to obtain them from the food we eat, mainly from fish.   Don’t miss my next article ” Fish or fish oil?”   To your health!   Emilia Klapp, RD, BS. The Diabetes Club - Overcoming Diabetes with Nutrition, with Diabetes and Weight Loss Coach - Emilia Klapp

EmiliaK

EmiliaK

 

Manufacturer switch

Bristol-Meyers no longer make merformin, Mylan makes it now with a new blueberry taste. The tablets are now round instead of oval. I have begun having the same effects that I had when I first started taking the pills ( stomach ache, running to the bathroom, some headaches) Do you think my body is readjusting to the new pill again.

BRTY0708

BRTY0708

 

Health Insurance

I went to the doctor’s office this past week. This was my first visit since my diabetic prognosis reared it’s ugly (half-century glucose mark) around 7 weeks ago. The disease is calming down. The Doc was impressed, though he wants to see me lose more weight. It seems extra exercise is in order. Perhaps a gym membership.   I spoke to my sister Liz today. I asked her if she thought insurance would cover a health club membership. “They are not going to cover that.” She said. “People who are obese go to the doctor all the time. If Insurance paid for that, everyone who was obese would be covered.”   I said, “I’m not so sure. I have a medical condition. I have a disease. A health club membership would immensely help my glucose levels.”   “Well,” she said, “Good luck with that.“   I then called my health insurance company to discuss coverage for a health club membership. They told me they do not have these benefits. I am not surprised, but I am incredulous: “You will cover drugs which cost more than a health-club membership, but you won’t cover a membership to a health club?”   “No we don’t cover that.” she said.   I said, “You will cover me if I am hospitalized, and I need an operation. You cover hospital stays… but you won’t cover the cost of a membership to a health club which would prevent these other costs?”   “That is right.” She said.   About 10 years ago a huge branch from the only tree on my (in-town) property fell onto my yard. I called my insurance company. They told me they would come and take the branch away, and repair the damage caused by the fallen branch. I told them that the tree was rotten and needed to come down. “We don’t take down trees which are standing,” they said, “only the branches which fall.”   “I don’t know if termites or carpenter ants have been inhabiting this tree for many years, but it’s completely rotten. It is hollow inside. This is a big tree.” I said.   “We don’t get rid of trees, sir.” They said.   “Okay,” I said, “let me give you a little background: This tree abuts my garage. The eaves of my garage – and my next-door neighbor’s garage – overhang each other. If the tree falls, it will take out my garage, and the neighbors garage. The neighbors had a fire a few years back, so their house has been totally re-done. So it is possible this tree will take out both garages and break into the brand-new house next door. Or, perhaps it will bounce off the new house and land on my other neighbor’s house. It doesn’t matter to me, though. I am just letting you know, because you are the ones who will be paying for it.”   They came out, took a look, and had the tree removed.   I spoke their language! But when it comes to health insurance, the language isn’t about health, at all! If dental insurance allowed 4 cleanings a year, they would be paying a lot less in fillings. That is dental health, but it is not a language insurance agencies speak. I feel sorry to these poor workers who have to deal with me on the phone, I really do. They have no answers and no authority. They only have the ability to regurgitate policy. Before I called, they probably hadn’t even considered whether or not it made any sense. Apparently, I am the only one who has noticed the snake eating it’s own tail. I said to the agent:   “You will cover drugs, but you won’t cover the activities which would alleviate the need for drugs. You will cover sickness, but you won’t cover health.”   “If you want to put it that way.” She said.   “It doesn’t matter how I phrase it. That is the way it is.” I said. (The rest is just semantics.)   Tonight I rode my bike for 45 minutes. My blood sugar dropped to 105.   Can I get a witness?

BAD

BAD

 

A Sign of Normalcy?

I forgot to eat lunch today.   I wasn't hungry, and I was busy. I never even thought about eating.   When I realized what I had done or what I had not done, at 2:10pm, my heart started racing. I went into panic mode. Anybody on rapid insulin knows what panic mode is: you've screwed up, you don't really know what you did wrong, but you know your in deep trouble! All the events of the morning went racing through my head: the coffee, the meeting, the work, the quick visits to DF and FB. I realized I did in fact still have my lunch in my bag. I also realized I had no reason to panic.   I'm getting near the end of 35 years of doing this. I think I've forgotten to eat lunch a few times, but I really can't remember. I was started on Lente insulin in 1975. I took one shot a day for probably the first x years. Then I moved to two a day. Progress! In the late 80's, around 1987, I remember discussing how silly this routine was with my doctor, and he agreed. I don't know the exact routine I was put on though. It involved Lente and Toronto (Regular). It's all a blur. I do know it wasn't until 1995 that I went on Intensive Insulin Therapy or MDI with Novalog and UltraLente. During these first 20 years skipping meals just wasn't done. Skipping meals would send me into a severe hypo. I needed to eat just as much to keep from going low as for energy or sunstainance. Even on MDI I didn't skip. I remember Mr. Endo saying I could, but I also remember somebody saying I shouldn't skip meals. I know I never had the confidence too. For some reason I always had raging hunger at meal times. The carbs? It has been ingrained in my head that missing meals is BAD!   I do know that I can now skip meals. In fact I do it all the time. I omitted breakfast three times last week. I just wasn't hungry in the mornings. But I don't forget. These were conscious decisions. I was prepared for the consequences.   There were no consequences with the planned or unplanned omissions. That's a good thing. It's a sign of control, of normalcy. We all strive for a level of normalcy in our lives.   Next time I won't panic. At least that's what I'm telling myself.

xMenace

xMenace

 

17 Ways Complex B Vitamins Help Diabetics

Many are the vitamin B complex benefits for our body, but a most important one could be the prevention of neuropathy in persons who have diabetes. Deficiencies in B-complex vitamins are associated with nerve damage, even in people who don’t have diabetes. A short supply of these vitamins can damage blood vessels and cause atherosclerosis, a very dangerous condition for everybody but especially for diabetics.   Vitamin B6 deficiency effects   Low levels of vitamin B6 can cause the following problems in our body:   1. Low blood levels of vitamin C 2. Increased excretion of calcium, zinc, and magnesium 3. Reduced copper absorption 4. Decreased immune system   Adequate amount of B6 vitamin helps as follow:   1. It prevents glycosylation of proteins which is responsible for diabetes complications 2. It decrease amount of C-reactive protein. This protein is an indication of inflammation that is associated with heart disease. 3. It prevents nerve damage. Neuropathy is a common condition in diabetics.   Food processing can destroy much of this vitamin.   Sources of B6 vitamin   Meat (organic grass fed) Poultry Fortified cereals Vegetarian meat substitutes Tuna Salmon (wild) Halibut, trout, herring, mackerel Potatoes Sunflower seeds Oatmeal Peanut butter   Vitamin B12   Vitamin B12 is needed for many functions to take place in the body such as:   1. Absorption of protein, fat and carbohydrate 2. Formation of red blood cells 3. Cell respiration and growth 4. Vitamin B12 works closely with vitamin B6 and folic acid to decrease elevated homocysteine levels. 5. It can prevent and relieve nerve damage.   Large doses of vitamin C can increase excretion of vitamin B12. Alcohol, sleeping pills, antacids can destroy or decrease vitamin B12. Older people do not always produce enough intrinsic factor which makes absorption of this vitamin difficult.   Sources of vitamin B12   Clams Mackerel Herring Nutritional yeast Kidneys Seafood Liver   Biotin   Biotin works in unison with B12, folate and pantothenic acid and it is essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates.   Body functions where biotin is critical   1. Biotin is involved in production and release of insulin. People with diabetes type 2 have lower concentrations of biotin in the blood. 2. It helps improve blood glucose control, especially for people with diabetes type 2. 3. Biotin can improve peripheral neuropathy. 4. It can help reduce excessive glucose produced by the liver and improve insulin sensitivity.   Low biotin levels have been found in elderly people and smokers. Biotin is found in most foods and it is resistant to heat.   Folic acid (folate)   A deficiency of folic acid causes anemia. The body cannot make any folate, therefore we must obtain it from foods. Enough folate can be stored to prevent a deficiency from occurring for up to four monts.   Folic acid is involved in the production of neurotransmitters, including serotonin and dopamine. When folate is present, it works with vitamin B12 to recycle homocysteine. Elevated homocysteine is more common in people with diabetes and is a known risk factor in heart disease.   Metformin may inhibit the absorption of folic acid. So can antacids, cimetidine, and ranitidine, used to treat heartburn and ulcers.   Folate is sensitive to heat. Boiling, steaming, or frying for five to ten minutes may destroy up to 96 percent of the folate in a food.   Sources of folic acid   Brussels sprouts Turnips Beet greens Mustard greens Brewer’s yeast Salmon, oysters Orange juice Split peas, avocados Bulgur wheat Milk Whole germ White beans Lima beans, mung beans   Other vitamins of the Complex B include Vitamin B1, Riboflavin, Niacin, and Pantothenic Acid.   As you can see, one more time, natural foods as well as fresh fruits and raw vegetables supply us basically all the vitamins we need. Try to include in your meals as many fresh foods as you can and stay away from processed foods. You will notice the difference in your health.   To your optimal health!   Emilia Klapp, RD,BS Your Diabetes Coach The Diabetes Club - Overcoming Diabetes with Nutrition, with Diabetes and Weight Loss Coach - Emilia Klapp

EmiliaK

EmiliaK

 

The Business of Diabetes

I am not going to discuss economics or money. I'm going to talk about management.   Effective managers have authority to make decisions, they are responsible for achieving objectives, and they are held accountable for their decisions. Too often in business these three get out of alignment. We might tell our managers to run their unit, but we might also tell them that any expenditure over $1,000 has to be approved by a director. We might not give our employees bonuses because they didn't achieve their goals, but when we dig into it, we discover that those goals were forced on them and we gave them no authority to make necessary and timely decisions. There are countless examples of this sort of mis-alignment in the business world, and it will keep management consultants employed in perpetuity.   One of the turning points in my own self management was to determine who had authority, responsibility, and accountability. Obviously I was being held accountable. It was my fault my A1C was in the 7's or higher. It was my fault my eyes were deteriorating. Nobody was suffering but me. Well my family was too. Dealing with my hypos was not fun.   Not only was I not taking responsibility for my disease, but my doctors weren't delegating it. Doctors don't do that. Well they do some, but they don't act like a senior business mentor that discusses your actions with you and encourages you to take the reigns. No, our doctors generally want to make decisions for us. They only delegate what they feel i necessary.   Authority is not an easy concept to get your head around. It's very similar to responsibility, but they are different. I can be responsible for dosing my insulins, but I will never have the authority to prescribe it to myself. My doctors and my insurance company, Medavie Blue Cross, held most of the authority. But I can certainly make the decison on which meter to use, where to buy my supplies, and how many strips to buy.   The disconnect was in responsibility, and it likely is in your world too.   Understand that you are being held accountable for your actions. Your doctor might say to you "take 5 to 10 Novarapid" before lunch, but it's you that suffers when that doesn't work. Is your doctor going to work hard at finding a unique dosing system that works for you? Not bloody likely. They'll maybe modify it slightly at each three month visit, charge you a few bucks for their services, and wait for you to fail again. And you will fail again. This disease needs rapid decision making. We can't send every decision to head office. We need to act now. If we ever want good decisons made, we need to take responsibility for making those decisons.   My health team members are now consultants. I ask them questions, and I listen to their advice, but I make my own decisions. I do not bring my test results to my doctors. There is no place in this relationship for them to hold me accountable for my actions or make decisions on my behalf. They provide me with advice, and I choose to give them information as needed.   For good or bad, I am in charge. I am the boss. Are you?

xMenace

xMenace

 

Is a Glycemic Diet Good for Type 2 Diabetes?

When we eat, most foods are converted into glucose (blood sugar). The feature of carbohydrates however, is that they produce higher levels of sugar in the blood than proteins and fats. So, based on this information, should you avoid eating carbohydrates if you have diabetes type 2? NO. What you need to do is to be selective with the type of carbohydrates you eat because some of them raise blood sugar levels more than others.   To help us being selective with carbohydrates, scientists have classified them based on the quantity of sugar produced in the blood after a meal. They created a list of foods and they named it The Glycemic index (GI).   What is the Glycemic food index good for?   The Glycemic food index helps us predict increases in our blood sugar levels after we eat carbohydrates. This index was calculated by feeding a group of volunteers and then conducting blood tests on them at short intervals. The results of the tests were a clear evidence that some foods raise the level of blood sugar significantly while others increase it very little.   Based on the tests results, the scientists who carried out the experiment, classified carbohydrates on a scale from 0 to 100. They gave high numbers to foods causing high blood sugar raises. We’ll call them “bad carbohydrates”. Low numbers were given to foods that caused small increases in blood sugar. We’ll call them “good carbohydrates”.   A list of some bad carbohydrates   Just to name a few, here are some bad carbohydrates you need to avoid. This advice is good both for people with diabetes type 2 and for people who don’t have the disease. It can be a preventive step.   Potatoes   White bread   Pancakes (refined white flour)   Sugary breakfast cereals   Sugary muffins   Sugar   Jam with sugar added   Sweets   Bananas   White rice   Pizza   Overcooked pasta   Beverages such as juices of fruits, Coca Cola, etc.   A list of some good carbohydrates Brown rice   Whole grain breads and cereals with no sugar added   Fruits   Raw vegetables   Pasta cooked al dente (cooked 5 to 6 minutes),   Legumes such as lentils, beans and chickpeas.   Diabetes type 2 and a glycemic diet   As you have probably guessed by now, basing your meals on the foods that have a low glycemic index is a way to prevent diabetes type 2, and if you are already there, it is a way to keep your blood sugar levels at bay, which is the main goal of a diabetic person. Remember that diabetes complications are quite serious, but they can be prevented. To help with the process, base your meals on the glycemic index.   A low glycemic diet helps you lose weight Although the above-mentioned studies were conducted to help people with diabetes, scientists found out to their surprise that people following a diet based on the glycemic index were also losing weight and maintaining the weight loss. The conclusion was that most of the times, excess weight is the result of a wrong selection of foods which leads to an abnormal storage of fats and sugars in the fat cells of the body.   Final Thoughts   Eating according to the principles of the glycemic index does not mean you need to starve or deprive yourself of tasty foods. In fact, eating this way can be very tasty. And what is even more important, it will help you control your blood sugar and lose weight. If you are diabetic and overweight, isn’t this your goal? Thus, don’t wait too much longer to start making changes in your diet and be surprised at your A1c test results next time you go to your doctor’s appointment to have one done. Your doctor will also be pleasantly surprised and may reduce the amount of medication you are taking. Wouldn’t that be wonderful?   To your health!   Emilia Klapp, RD, BS Your Diabetes Coach The Diabetes Club - Overcoming Diabetes with Nutrition, with Diabetes and Weight Loss Coach - Emilia Klapp Helping you lower blood sugar with nutrition and exercise

EmiliaK

EmiliaK

 

Recycling Your Syringes And Lancets???

There is much debate amongst the various diabetic online communities, as to whether or not it’s ok to reuse your syringes and lancets. I truly sympathize with diabetics that are seriously struggling financially, and can’t afford their supplies, however, it is not medically safe to reuse syringes. Our blood naturally has pathogens (disease causing bacteria); once a needle has been inserted in to the skin (for longer than a second or two) the needle is now considered a bio-hazard, and or contaminant. When ever possible, its important to use a brand new needle at all times. Reusing a needle is like using the bathroom without washing your hands.   Once the used needle is out of the skin & exposed to air, the contaminants grows and gets stronger. There are no white blood cells present to fight off those pathogens, therefore, if you reuse your needles, your potentially reinfecting yourself with stronger pathogens/bacteria, and the body has to work harder to fight them off.   Both syringes and pen needles have special anti-bacterial lubricants, that allows for a smoother and less painful entry. Reusing needles will eventually loose this special coding. Both needles will also eventually become dull and jagged at the tips. Once the tips are bent because of over use, you will potentially cause bruising, in addition to the infection that may be caused by the now overly contaminated needle.   In NYC, unfortunately, there are no official known procedures, as to how to dispose of your used diabetic supplies. If your @ work, it is my opinion (as a courtesy to others) that you store all your used test strips, lancets, and syringes in a coffee can, or one of these 99 cent hard plastic containers. Once container is full, tape up top securely and dispose by regular means, or you can give to your doctor and have him/her dispose of your medical waste. If your hanging out with some friends, another alternative, is to rap your used supplies in a napkin securely, and dispose of waste. Be respectful and mindful of non-diabetics; make sure all needles are covered bare minimum!! No one wants to worry about being stuck with with somebody Else’s needle.   Lancets are a little different. To my understanding, lancets are generally ok to reuse, because today’s lancet devices are so fast, that the needle has no contact with blood. However, keep in mind that like syringes, lancets do become dull, and can cause bruising. Try to change your lancets at least once a week. Also make sure that you are rotating ALL sites..   © 2010 DiabeticRadio.com

yogirajj

yogirajj

 

Why Participate in diabetes forums?

Have you ever asked yourself why you participate in a diabetes forum? I remember why I started perticipating. I realized I was on a downward spiral: I was getting heavier every year, my retinopathy was progressing, and my personal relationships were suffering. And my health care team was not providing the support I needed.   So I came to DiabetesForums.com looking for support. The support I needed was practical advice on how to improve my control. I wanted to learn how to best use my new pump, I wanted good BGs, I wanted fewer hypos, I wanted no more life threatening hypos, and I wanted to save my eyes.   I have to say I found everything I was looking for, but I didn't find it how I expected to. I learned how to pump first by participatng in the chat room. This is a great tool where people can really open up and get to know each other. It has been very active in th past. We even used to have voice chats. We'd arrange to meet with a third party tool I'm not allowed to mention, and we'd talk about stuff. It was cool to hear different people from around the world. Don't expect to find doors to this media on forums though. Forum owners are very protective of their revenue streams.   It was during one of these sessions that I asked Spike how I could set my basals to match my needs as my health team was being useless. His simple reply "You need to basal test" rocked my world. There was little discussion about it between us, but the door was open. I immediately undertook a self research program to fiind out what it was all about. Suddenly there was much hope.   The second event happenned when I was questioning others on their practice of low-carb eating to control their BGs. I said something like "yea it will undoubtedly help your BGs, but what about heart disease? We're already at high risk. And what about your kidneys? All that protein must be bad!" The reply was simple and straightforward: "Do you even know what cholesterol is? You need to do some research on this!" I really didn't have a clue about what lipids were, so I made a conscious decision to keep an open and flexible mind and find out as much as I could about "cholesterol." Three years later I'm still on the journey. When leading lipidologists can't agree on it, I don't know how we can. But I have tried to reconcile all the evidence, and I have made various conclusions. BTW I try to focus on evidence. I put little credence on opinion with no logical backing.   But lets get back to why you are here. Do you need support? Of course you do. We all do. We're all diabetic. Diabetics have less than ideal expected outcomes. There are many statistics and many graphs, but they all basically look like the graphs below: worse than a normal person!     Whether you like it or not, this path called diabetes will kill you early, and it will degrade your quality of life.   If you want to accept this, then by all means continue with what you are doing. Place your trust in your health team. Don't consider new or radical ideas. Don't think outside the box. Don't fight back. Don't have hope. Continue what you are being told to do like a good little boy or girl.   What should you expect to find on a diabetes forum? What should you be looking for? You should expect to find much tension and debate. We all know we need to find best paths, and we all have our own ideas what that path is. This naturally results in disagreement. And it may be very passionate disagreement, because our lives depend on our decisions. You should relish this debate. It's where holes in the box are found.   The only decision I won't support is the decision to stay in the box. These statistics don't lie.

xMenace

xMenace

 

New to this forum...

Hi all! I have been diagnosed about a month ago. It has been psychologically very challenging. I have never been negative oriented, so why start now?   I am hoping to glean some info: Vitamins. Food. CHEAP TEST STRIP suppliers.   Everyone is different. I am well aware that what works for some may not work for others, but I love to learn what has worked - and failed - for others.   Thanks everyone!   -Bryan

BAD

BAD

 

4 months into my type 2 diagnosis

I guess I wasn't particularly surprised with my diagnosis on April 15. I get test results mailed to me and saw that A1C of 7.2 and fasting of 127 and knew what was coming. Four months later and some low-carbing I have lost 25 pounds ad my A1C is down to 6.0. It has not been easy, but then again it hasn't been hard as I thought it would be either. It is just something I have to do - not a diet, but a lifestyle "redirection". A new direction - eating better, exercising and giving my BG monitor a heck of a workout too.   At first I got a couple of books including The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed and Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes. These 2 books got my head right about this and I got learned a great deal about what is really going on.   My PCP is not a wealth of info, but then again, I think he understood that I had a handle on this from day one. I still wanted to meet with an Endo even though as a nurse told me "you're not that bad of a diabetic" - very insulting and uninformed on her part. I met with the endo about 6 weeks after diagnosis and had already got my A1C to 6.5. We had a nice chat and even though I probably didn't need it - I scheduled an appointment with the nutritionist CDE. She kind of towed the ADA line of low fat, moderate carbs. Since I was testing, testing, testing I knew how many carbs I could handle and the 45 grams/meal she suggested would have me 180-220 2 hours PP. I took some of her advice but not all.   Be your own "expert" and read everything taking what works for you and discarding the rest. Test as much as you can afford - it is the best way to learn which foods will affect you and how. There is no right answer for everyone - you are the one who knows your body best.   On the upside, I have discovered almond flour and it is my best friend allowing me to have my beloved choc chip cookies. And bacon how I love bacon. And dark chocolate - I have 2 squares as my night-time treat. And Breyers low carb ice cream bars... I could go on and on ...   Things I miss most are potatoes but you know what? I do have potatoes every other week and half the serving size I used to have. I am not going to avoid what is considered bad, just going to give it much more thought and plan for it.

Brucelegs

Brucelegs

 

New to this forum...

hi all! I have been diagnosed about a month ago. It has been psychologically very challenging. I have never been negative oriented, so why start now?   I am hoping to glean some info: Vitamins. Food. CHEAP TEST STRIP suppliers.   Everyone is different. I am well aware that what works for some may not work for others, but I love to learn what has worked - and failed - for others.   Thanks everyone!   -Bryan  

BAD

BAD

 

Diabetes

Please read my blog here:   http://arthuriandaily.wordpress.com

BAD

BAD

 

I Passed Out At The Wheel

When I was 18 I had to work in order to earn money for college. I got a job at a local supermarket. One Saturday night it was my turn to stay after hours, to help with the mopping detail. Every aisle had to be clean and bright before we went home. Being so tired from the day's work made the mopping very difficult for me. On my way home that evening I thought my strange feelings were due to my fatigue, but while making a right hand turn at the first intersection, I collapsed at the wheel. The next thing I knew my parents were standing over me and a crowd of men were behind them. Several cops were there too. My wheels were not straightened during that right hand turn, due to my hypo, and my car went off the road and down a steep embankment into a creek bed.   My car had passed between two vertical posts that were supporting a huge bill board. Some people were measuring the distance between the posts and the width of my car, and they said the opening was about two inches more than the width of the car. My car had passed between the posts, but did not touch either one of them. I was not hurt and the car did not have a scratch on it. The guys standing in back were from a bar across the road. They had seen my car leave the road and they found my parent's phone number in my wallet.   Everyone but my parents thought I was drunk. There had never been any alcohol in my life at any time. My parents told the cops about my diabetes. I don't think anyone there believed their explanation. There was no ticket though and a big wrecker pulled my car up the embankment later that night, or on Sunday. It was like the whole thing was just a bad dream. There were many hypos during my early years during my sleep or after a lot of exertion. There was no way for me to test my blood sugar before starting home that night.   Glucose monitors were not available until many years after that. My feelings and urine testing were my only clues to possible oncoming hypos. My parents thought that God had protected me and that was why I was not hurt. It was wonderful that my car was in good shape and I was able to attend classes Monday morning.   In today's world, I would blame myself if this happened. I now test my BG every time before driving. I do not drive unless my BG is 90 or above.

Richard157

Richard157

 

The Big Picture

This may surprise you, but pushing dietary change on society is not on my to-do list.   Change is difficult, and this is a big change. Maybe I can affect change with a few individuals here and there. Hopefully I can get people to at least think about the food they eat. But changing the minds of the masses is not going to happen easily.   One of the problems is getting everybody on board. I'm often amazed at the firmness of peoples' beliefs in food. Many are staunchly rooted in beliefs. It's very similar to politics. "I believe we can eat everything in moderation," "Plant based diets are proven to be the best for us," or "We just need to stop stuffing food into our faces and get off our butts and exercise!" You can argue science all you want, but most of these people have absolutely no ear for your thoughts.   Our society also values compromise. We compromise in politics, in labor relations, and in day-to-day business relationships. You give a little and I give a little. We meet in the middle. But sometimes the middle is a dangerous place. Nutrition may be one of those dangerous places. I have no doubt that compromise will rule the day.   Then there's the problem of feeding people. One thing that becomes clear is that food output will drop. Our food supply is artificially high. Letting it grow naturally will reduce food quantity, and probably by a lot. But that's what limiting the food supply does. It controls population levels. What is a sustainable national and world population level? How long can we spend modifying our food supply? Will people want to wait? War?   The real problems become apparent when you start thinking about changing investment: I want all grain farms to become livestock farms. I want all 200 million acres switched over. Never mind finding the cows to populate them. I want all grass-fed animals; no grain fed animals will be allowed to be sold. All those cereal factories will need to be converted to slaughterhouses. All those grain carriers will need to be converted to cattle cars. And there's much more beyond this. Fertilizer will not be needed. Pesticides will be banned. Food will grow where it will despite the weather and pests. Famine will happen naturally. We won't be able to store mountains of broccoli like we store grains.   Are you seeing the problems yet? Are we going to hurt society by pushing these radical ideas? Learn to manage your diabetes. It's not going away.   I wondered what it would be like if I were the President of the United States of America trying to convince our Senate to move our grain based food system to a system that supports the new Atkins Diet: grass-fed meats and veggies.   [senator from Illinois] Mr. President, my state grows mostly corn and soybeans. You can drive from top to bottom or side to side, and you will find mostly farm fields. We have over 76,000 farms in this great state. Our agricultural revenue is about $9 billion a year.Are you saying you want all of these farms converted to raising only livestock and dairy?   [President John] Yes I am.   [senator from Illinois] We are already a big producer of meat and dairy. About $2 billion of farm revenue comes from swine. It takes 5 to 7 pounds of grain to raise one pound of meat. If you take away all of our corn, we won't be able to feed our pigs!   [President John] You won't need to feed them. They will root for themselves.   [senator from Illinois] But sir, even if we could transform over 50,000 farms to livestock, our production volume will be severely impaired without feed grains.   [President John] Yes they will be. If you are good, and you are not hit with much disease, you will be able to raise about a tenth of the population per acre as before. But sir, you will also be able to charge more money for your product, your citizens will be healthier which will reduce your health care costs, and they will be happier and more productive.   [senator from Illinois] They will also starve! If they don't go crazy. How do I convince the people of my great state to give up popcorn?   [President John] They will learn to enjoy bacon and cheese curds..   [senator from Illinois] My citizens will revolt. They may even pack up and move to Wisconsin!   [President John] They better learn to like cheese then.   [senator from Wisconsin] I don't appreciate the remark sir. My state produces much more than cheese.   [President John] Not anymore.   [senator from Wisconsin] Sir?   [President John] Your farms will all be converted to dairy farms. You can grow hay to feed them.   [senator from Wisconsin] Sir?   [President John] Well, you will also be able to grow some barley for your breweries. You can have one micro-brewery for every 100,000 citizens. We need to minimize the gluten exposure.   [senator from North Dakota] Don't worry Jim, we'll sell you all the barley you need.   [President John] I'm sorry Pete, but North Dakota will become a bison producer.   [senator from North Dakota] Oh?   [President John] Wild Bison is one of the healthiest foods on the planet!   [senator from North Dakota] Wild sir?   [President John] Yes. Your state will be one big farm. Bison will run free everywhere in North Dakota. Your farmers will need to learn how fire a rifle while riding horses.   [senator from North Dakota] Horses sir?   [President John] Kentucky thoroughbreds.   [senator from Kentucky] Sir, you want to use thoroughbreds for Buffalo hunting?   [President John] Yes I do.   [senator from Kentucky] They are fine horses sir, but they are bred primarily for racing.   [President John] Horse racing will be banned for the next eight years. We need all the horses to harvest our great herds.   [senator from Wyoming] Sir, there are only about half a million bison in American stocks. This is not enough to feed a state let alone a nation. You'll wipe them out completely!   [President John] Stem cells.   [senator from Wyoming] Stem cells sir?   [President John] Sorry, it's classified.   [senator from Kansas] Mr. President, what about our wheat, surely you aren't going to ...   [President John] Bison.   [senator from Kansas] Sir?   [President John] Every state west of the Mississippi that can support Bison will. Every other state west of the Mississippi will raise beef cattle, except for California.   [senator Arnold] Sir, California is an agricultural state   [President John] And so it shall be.   [senator Arnold] What do you want us to grow sir?   [President John] Salads: tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, celery, radishes   [senator Arnold] Sir, California is too warm for radishes.   [President John] Failure is not an option!   [senator from Utah] Sir, the state of Utah is a mjor producer of fertilizer. This plan will put many jobs at risk.   [President John] We will lose all 33,000 jobs in fetilizer production.   [senator from Utah] But sir, our great state cannot support quantities of livestock.   [President John] Don't worry Mike. We expect most of your citizens to move out or die off. National Park Utah will be the ultimate getaway destination.   [senator from Utah] The ultimate?   [President John] It will be one of the few states not overcome by the stench of animal feces.   [senator from Utah] Thank you sir *smirk*   [President John] When the wind is from the west.   [senator from Utah] *scowl*   [senator from New York] Excuse me Mr. President, but I don't see how this plan will feed our population. You are cutting our food supply by at least half,   [President John] Our obesity crisis will be instantly solved.   [senator from New York] But Mr. President, a hungry nation is not a happy nation. It is not a healthy nation!   [President John] We have a three step plan for this very situation. In phase one all the illegal immigrants will be put on ships and sent to India.   [senator from Arizona] I applaud your sentiment sir, but what makes you think India will take millions of Mexicans?   [President John] I don't.   [senator from Arizona] Then how will they get to India sir?   [President John] They probably won't.   [senator from Arizona] Were will they go then sir?   [President John] Once they leave our territorial waters, it's out of our hands. The second phase of the plan will be to take over Mexico.   [The Senate] Whaaaaat?   [President John] I know it's not prime land, but it will supply enough coconut oil and chickens for our needs.   [senator from Arizona] Will it be enough to feed the Mexicans and us?   [President John] What Mexicans?   [senator from Arizona] What Mexicans? *hah* I suppose they are going on ships too?   [President John] If we have extra.   [senator from Arizona] Well who's going to raise all these chickens and coconuts?   [President John] I'm thinking Oregonians, but we haven't decided yet. We might just use New Englanders. They like to travel to Mexico.   [senator from Lousiana] I like your plan Mr. President. This will stop fertilizer from polluting the gulf. Our fisheries can make a comeback!   [President John] Exactly Mickey, but you will lose your pesticide indtustries.   [senator from Florida] But Mr. President, we need pesticides to protect our orange crops!   [President John] That's not a healthy way to raise oranges sir. You will have to use manual labor to remove pests.   [senator from Florida] Manual labor? But you are shipping all the Mexicans away!   [President John] Canadians.   [senator from Florida] Canadians Mr. President?   [President John] Phase three. Most Canadians have homes in Florida anyway.   [senator from Maine] And what will you do with Canada sir?   [President John] Beef, seafood, and exotic meats.   [senator from Maine] Exotic meats sir?   [President John] Yes, exotic meats. Moose, elk, beaver. You like to eat beaver, don't you?

xMenace

xMenace

 

It's a losing game!

Some time ago I did a google search on proliferative retinopathy in non-diabetics. I can't remember why I did that. Maybe it was a forum thread. Doesn't matter. If you don't already know, I've been battling this condition since 1994. It's impossible for me to go through a day without experiencing sight difficulties. I try to keep in touch with news on it.   So I read a few studies. They went something like this.     The line Nearly all patients had changes of the arteries due to arteriosclerosis or hypertension. hit me pretty hard. There's an obvious relationship between retinopathy and atherosclerosis [heart disease].   Of course I immediately forgot about it.   Earlier this week when I was reading the Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada, I noticed something related:     In the case of type 1's like me, retinopathy is considered an additional risk factor for CAD.   Oh Joy!   Then this morning I recieved this in my google news alert: Retina Damage Common Among Older Diabetes Patients     This article says retinopathy is a sentinel indicator of further complications. It's the canary in the coal mine.   What these articles say to me is I'm likely to die of a heart attack or stroke even though I know of no relative on either side that has. None!   Which brings me back to when I was 12yrs old and playing little league baseball. We were playing in the city championships, and we were getting our butts kicked 13-3 in the final inning. I remember the score but I can't remember how many innings we played. I think it was seven. Anyway, our team was pretty down. It was clear we were beaten. The game was over. I came up to the plate, and I smacked that ball so hard it went half way across the field behind the ballfield and rolled all the way to the tennis courts.   I hate losing!

xMenace

xMenace

 

I ranted today

I admit I have built up tension.   There are big gaps between what I have come to believe in regarding both sound diabetes management and general good health and what I see in public policy, diabetes care guidelines, and clinical practice. This is a big topic, and I do not want to get into it right now. I've already done that today, but I will give examples.   The Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada states in Appendix 3 p197     Maybe this makes perfect sense to many, but it severely pissed me off! Why? Because this nearly killed me. I'm nearly blind because of bad management. If you want good control, you have to match insulin to your need, and your need follows patterns. No exceptions. But our patterns are all different, and many do approximate basal insulin action. But there's a large number that need better basal matching.   Page 107:     This basically agrees with my beliefs: TGs indicate danger. The danger comes from sugar! Sugar decreases LDL-C particle size [and causes inflammation]. Basic stuff supported by science. Yea!   However, the document then says   Don't reduce carbs, just their refinement.     P40   Grain is by definition a refined carb. We can't eat them whole. Grains are their own food group in Canada.     These passages really push me. I want to take a baseball bat to a few heads, or better yet kneecaps. Their heads are worthless.   If you can't see why I'm angry, their argument goes like this:   "Sugar is the real problem here people. It causes increased triglycerides, and as sugar increases TGs it reduces your LDL particle sizes to dangerous levels. You have small, atherogenic LDL particles. This nasty sugar is also glycates and oxydizes these small LDLs. It's a double whammy. You are going to die young from CHD! "   The obvious solution here is to cut out sugar as much as possible. Present the problem to 1000 kindergarteners and you will get 1000 children no longer wanting to eat sugar.   "We don't want you to reduce sugar. We want you to package it with fibre to make its effects slower, and we want to package it with antioxidants to make it not oxydyze. Whatever you do, don't touch those bad fats though. We can't tell you why, but the Americans think they are bad."   Chemically sugar is sugar. Carbohydrates are all sugar. There's no such thing as a carbohydrate that isn't sugar. Got it yet? It doesn't matter that it's wrapped in fibre. It still goes into your bloodstream and your body recognizes it as sugar. You might not get as big a spike, but it's still creating TGs, small LDLs, and it's oxydizing away. Packaged antioxidants as found is fruits and veggies certainly help with the oxydization though. BTW there's no antioxidants to speak of in refined grains, rice, or potatoes.   Side note: potatoes used to be rich in vitamin E. Due to selective breeding, they have virtually none today.   So I wrote a letter about all this stuff and more. It was to a doctor on the committee that sets this stuff. He's a fairly well known Canadian diabetologist. I've met him before, and we've emailed before, briefly . He replied     Pissing in the wind, I know.

xMenace

xMenace

 

Blogging

I've tried blogging a bit in the past. I never know what to write though. The bloggers I follow simply write about what's happening, so that's what I'm going to do. I write a lot to other people, and I try to tell them what I'm doing and why, but this blog will be soley about me. I will write about my decisions and challenges. A window into my world.   Before I go, I want to talk about some of my past and of my current objectives. I think it's important to have objectives.   Current status: Age 49 Type 1, 35th year MM 722 Insulin Pump, Novarapid A bunch of meters, but primarily Nova Max Link, BD Link, and Bayer Contour Link Advanced proliferative retinopathy dx'd March 1994 Vitrectomy Oct 26, 2006 Currently zero signs of damage. I see optho every four months. Height 5'11" Weight 232.8lbs Diet: currently low carbing around 30-50g a day, mostly grass-fed local meats, veggies, raw milk cheeses Bloodwork:   Just got a note from my NP: Well… that is a bad day … and it is reflected in your fasting blood sugar. However, your A1C is very nice. Have placed the labs on the portal for your review…HDL is amazing (as it has been for some time) but I smile every time I see it. I emailed her that my fasting sugar was awful due to a bad set.   Objectives: A1C mid 5's or better Triglycerides below 0.5 mmol/l Minimal hypos Obtain an optimal weight Make my body healthier - cardiovascular, cancer, dementia, etc. I want to reach at least the age of 80 with no further complications!   Total Cholesterol: 4.65 down from 4.74 HDL: 2.21 down from 2.28 LDL: 2.24 down from 2.27 Trigs: 0.45 up from 0.42   A!C: 5.6 down from 5.9 Fasting: 12.1! up from 2.7 (ha!)   -----------------------------   Today   I woke this morning with a BG of 4.8 mmol/l. If you are going to read this stuff, get used to the measurements. I'm not including the American numbers, even though I am an American. If you haven't clued in, I live in Canada. I got to work about an hour ago. I emptied my bag and discovered I didn't have a meter with me. I checked the spare in my desk, but it has no strips. *sigh* I may pick up some at lunch, but I think I'll just skip testing 'till I get home. I have to leave early to pick up my son from his summer job. He's working at a church for the summer as a councellor/maintenance person. I have only sliced roast beef for lunch, so it should be pretty easy to keep the BGs good.   Just got my labs. I'm very happy about my new personal best A1C of 5.6! I've been trying to get it down, but 5.9 is the best I could achieve. The only change I made this time was to drop carbs from 50-75g a day to 30-50g a day. It seems strange I could get a 5.9 eating 250g a day and not improve it by dropping to <75, but I could improve it by a slightly further drop to <50. I did it basically by giving up milk and cutting back on fruit. I felt my sugars stabilize immediately. Crazy disease! My weight has dropped some during this time as well. I was 238.6 on June 8th. My low since then is 230.6.   I'm on a new project now. It will present some major challenges for me diabetiwise. I'll be living alone in another city for three or four months, St. John's Newfoundland. I'll have no car. Today I'm trying to find cost effective living arrangements. I want something near more than one food source, near a pharmacy, that has exercise facilities, phone, tv, and internet, and is on a bus route. If you've never heard of St. John's, it's the oldest city in North America, and it is the most easterly city on the continent. St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The people are very friendly. I will be flying there probably the weekend after next. They are resetting teh connectivity with the client, so there's no point going till it's all set up. This is phase 2, and apparently phase 1 connections didn't work so well.

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