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What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a physical disorder involving the pancrease, a gland which produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts to regulate the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Insulin lowers the blood glucose (sugar) level and promotes transport and entry of glucose into the muscle cells and other tissues for their energy needs and into the liver and fat cells for storage. Inadequate secretion of insulin causes elevated blood sugar and lipid levels. What is the result? Some common symptoms of DM - excessive thirst and hunger. As the disease progresses the body's inability to store or use glucose cause weight loss and fatigue. Another common symptom that is often overlooked is blurred vision. DM affects about 16 million Americans, yet perhaps only half of them know they have it. Often those with the most common type of diabetes (type 2), which tend to show up in older adults, confuse their symptoms with aging or being overweight. As a result, they don't get the treatment they need. Left untreated, diabetes can cause serious problems, including an increased risk of stroke and heart attack, blindness, kidney trouble, nerve damage, and amputation (loss) of limbs due to circulatory problems. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1, also know as juvenile appears early in life - 14 years of age or younger - when the pancrease stops working. Type 2 occurs later in life. About 90 percent of diabetics have type II diabetes, which results when the muscles become resistant to insulin, even though the body may be producing enough. Is there a cure for diabetes melitus? No, but both types can be managed well with a combination of drugs, exercise, a well-balanced, healthy diet and monitoring of blood sugar levels. What should you do if you suspect you might have diabetes? See your doctor and follow his or her advice. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a physical disorder involving the pancrease, a gland which produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts to regulate the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Insulin lowers the blood glucose (sugar) level and promotes transport and entry of glucose into the muscle cells and other tissues for their energy needs and into the liver and fat cells for storage. Inadequate secretion of insulin causes elevated blood sugar and lipid levels. What is the result? Some common symptoms of DM - excessive thirst and hunger. As the disease progresses the body's inability to store or use glucose cause weight loss and fatigue. Another common symptom that is often overlooked is blurred vision. DM affects about 16 million Americans, yet perhaps only half of them know they have it. Often those with the most common type of diabetes (type 2), which tend to show up in older adults, confuse their symptoms with aging or being overweight. As a result, they don't get the treatment they need. Left untreated, diabetes can cause serious problems, including an increased risk of stroke and heart attack, blindness, kidney trouble, nerve damage, and amputation (loss) of limbs due to circulatory problems. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1, also know as juvenile appears early in life - 14 years of age or younger - when the pancrease stops working. Type 2 occurs later in life. About 90 percent of diabetics have type II diabetes, which results when the muscles become resistant to insulin, even though the body may be producing enough. Is there a cure for diabetes mellitus? No, but both types can be managed well with a combination of drugs, exercise, a well-balanced, healthy diet and monitoring of blood sugar levels. What should you do if you suspect you might have diabetes? See your doctor and follow his or her advice.

TRM

TRM

 

Successful Living With Diabetes Type 2

Living successfully with diabetes is what I've learned to do since my diagnosis in 2008. At the age of 45, I was diagnosed with new onset Type 2 Diabetes. What is Type 2 diabetes? Normally cells in the pancreas release proper amounts of insulin. This helps sugar enter into cells throughout the body for energy. One main problem of type 2 diabetes is the “resistance” of cells to insulin. In other words, it takes more insulin to produce the same effect. In addition, people with type 2 diabetes do not make enough insulin for what their body needs. Type 2 diabetes is not just a problem of blood sugars. It also affects blood pressure, cholesterol, and fats, inflammation in the body, and blood clotting. Type 2 diabetes can run in families as it does in mine. My maternal grandmother (my mother's mom) is 92 years old and has lived with diabetes for many years. This disease is often seen in the overweight. The tie-in with obesity comes from the fact that there is higher “resistance” to insulin with higher body weight. Were there early warning signs I missed? Yes, they are as follows: Dry mouth
Fatigue
Frequent urination
Increased thirst
Mood swings or irritability
Unexplained weight loss
Blurred vision
Detecting diabetes early on can reduce the risk of developing kidney disease, and eye damage. Please learn the early warning signs of diabetes and notify your physician if you suspect you may have diabetes. Has my life changed since being diagnosed with diabetes? Yes. Prior to being diagnosed, I lived a fairly normal life. When I say fairly normal, I mean I was married, worked in the private sector till I was laid off, exercised only occasionally, and ate what I wanted without thinking what I might be doing to my body. Following being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I had to make changes to my lifestyle, which include routine exercise, 30 minutes a day and controlled diet. I choose to walk at a moderate pace for my exercise 30 minutes a day. I eat 3 meals plus a snack, watching the number of carbohydrates I consume. In addition I check my blood sugar at least twice a day. Through exercise, eating healthier, and prayer, my diabetes is currently controlled without the use of any medication. I am grateful to God for helping me thus far. Why? When I was first diagnosed, my blood sugar level was over 400. My doctor at the time thought I would be on insulin for the rest of my life. The only time I was on insulin was when I was in the hospital. I have done much research on diabetes since being diagnosed and have learned that 20 million people in the United State have it. Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the USA and is increasing in children and young adults. Who are some of the people living successfully with diabetes? Brett Michaels – Musician
Missy Fox – Professional Marathon Runner
Gary Hall, Jr. - U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist – Swimming
Mike Echols – NFL – Tennessee Titans
Scott Coleman – Swimmer
Edward James Olmos – Actor (Admiral Adama on “Battlestar
Gallactica”)
Patti LaBelle – Singer
Arthur Ashe – Professional Tennis Player
In future articles, I will discuss complications of diabetes and how they can be avoided, diet, and how to develop an exercise program. Also, I will share with you more individuals who live successfully with diabetes. Please continue to follow my articles to learn more about diabetes. Remember: Successful Living With Diabetes is possible.

TRM

TRM

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