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malcolm

pumps for children

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malcolm

:wavey: Hi my name is Malcolm I have a 7 year old daughter who has been diabetic since she was 3.She has had a few bad night time hypos so her consultant suggested we think about a pump for her .As there are not a lot of children in Scotland on a pump we dont realy know a lot about them ,any advise would be great .Thank,s.

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HollyB

Hi and welcome,

 

Not to take you away from this forum, which is great, but you might want to also check out childrenwithdiabetes.com. Their forum has lots of parents with kids of all ages, many of them on pumps. Most attest that the pump changed their children's lives -- I see the phrase "gave us our life back" a lot.

 

That said, my impression is the pump gives the most dramatic benefits for the very young (toddlers and preschoolers who require tiny doses and eat extremely unpredictably) and kids heading into their teens (who really appreciate the freedom the pump gives them.) The pump is also really good for kids like yours, because you can have a variable basal rate. That means instead of taking your injection of Lantus or NPH and being "stuck" with that level all through the night, you can program the pump so that your daughter receives less insulin at the times she tends to go low. For example, you might have the pump deliver less insulin from 11 pm to 3 am. That would require a lot of middle-of-the-night testing to get the levels set just right, but I think anyone would agree a week or two of regular checking/adjusting is a lot better than the constant worry of nighttime hypos.

 

My son is 14, and has been pumping for about 6 months. You would have to drag him kicking and screaming back to injections.

 

Feel free to pm me with questions if you want, or if you'd like input from someone with a child more the same age (you probably have questions about how they handle school, etc.), check out the childrenwithd. forums.

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ramrummy

Hi, I have a 7 year old son who has been a diabetic sinc April 05, he went on a pump 2 weeks ago, after BGLs ranging from 2.8 - 22 in one day for a long time - protophane was very erratic in him.

 

In Australia, the number of children getting pumps is increasing dramatically as our endos are realising its a great way to deal will unpredicatable behaviour of children and more are receiving the pumps arlier rather than later. Our educator (nurse from childrens hospital) says that they are averaging 10 kids a fortnight being diagnosed in the kids hospital.

 

I would be glad to tell you what I (we) have experienced in the lead up and since going on the pump.

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caryj

I know the Cozmo can deal in as small quantities as .05 units/hr -- I have seen many little ones running around with the same pump I have (the Cozmo) and I've even heard of a child as young as 2 on the Cozmo (although I haven't personally witnessed it, so I don't know its accuracy). With a child, the micromanagment of insulin is very important to sucessful pumping -- because small changes can have drastic results to their bodies.

 

I don't know what kind of unit measurments the other pumps handle, but they must be atleast .1 units.

 

But I've heard lots of recent sucess stories of kids going on the pump -- which I think is fantastic because the pumps are significantly better nowadays.

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ramrummy

We have Animas 1200 (in Australia) and its smallest increment is .025 units. It has a big screen and my son who is left handed can manipulate the buttons very easily. The hospital we went through has the Cozmo, Animas and the new Medtronic- with or without the subc. sensor. We choose Animas cos the hospital had a batch of Cozmos where screen was cracking, and the sensor pump is still too new for my liking. The Anmas is also the only fully waterproof pump (or so I'm told) - important when boating.

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Tim_Roy

Animas pumps have the finest degree of basal and bolus settings. Their main drawback is that they hold less insulin than other pumps. Children almost always use far less insulin than adults, so this is a no-brainer.

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Funnygrl
We have Animas 1200 (in Australia) and its smallest increment is .025 units. It has a big screen and my son who is left handed can manipulate the buttons very easily. The hospital we went through has the Cozmo, Animas and the new Medtronic- with or without the subc. sensor. We choose Animas cos the hospital had a batch of Cozmos where screen was cracking, and the sensor pump is still too new for my liking. The Anmas is also the only fully waterproof pump (or so I'm told) - important when boating.

Cozmo is waterproof.

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right2fight

Hi Malcolm, While the pump is being widely used, it may not be for your child. Be sure to look into the cons, such as sleepless nights, exact carb counting and changing infusion sites can be traumatic for a young child, before making a decision. I have found on the "CWD" forum that only the pros are mentioned. Remember there are pros and cons to everything.

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duck
Hi Malcolm, While the pump is being widely used, it may not be for your child. Be sure to look into the cons, such as sleepless nights, exact carb counting and changing infusion sites can be traumatic for a young child, before making a decision. I have found on the "CWD" forum that only the pros are mentioned. Remember there are pros and cons to everything.

 

Sleepless nights are not unique to pumping, carb-counting is at the very least not any worse than "sliding scales" or "exchanges", and infusion sets every three days versus multiple shots every day can be considered cons as well. At least IMHO.

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jjackie
:wavey: Hi my name is Malcolm I have a 7 year old daughter who has been diabetic since she was 3.She has had a few bad night time hypos so her consultant suggested we think about a pump for her .As there are not a lot of children in Scotland on a pump we dont realy know a lot about them ,any advise would be great .Thank,s.

 

Hi Malcom my daughter was diagnosed at four years old and is now 12, she started on a pump 18 months ago and she would never want to go back to injections. I run an email support group for families with children with diabetes living in the UK. There are 125 members and a lot of these parents have young children using insulin pumps. I know that there are three Scottish members on the list who have insulin pumps. My daughter used to have severe hypos at night and had had a number of seisures in the past because she has no hypo awareness when asleep.

 

If you want to talk to UK parents with young children using pumps and MDI come and subscribe to the email support list. Details found here. Any problems with subscribing let me know. Its a busy active list

 

CWD UK Information Section

Email and Mailing Lists

 

children with DIABETES - CWD UK Information

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jjackie
Hi Malcolm, While the pump is being widely used, it may not be for your child. Be sure to look into the cons, such as sleepless nights, exact carb counting and changing infusion sites can be traumatic for a young child, before making a decision. I have found on the "CWD" forum that only the pros are mentioned. Remember there are pros and cons to everything.

 

Hi there are a lot of pumpers on the UK CWD forum and I have yet to hear of any child having many problems with changing infusion sites. My daughter has always said that the site changes do not hurt. Its rare that any of the UK parents say that their children have problems with site changes. You may still have to carb count and do blood tests and night checks if you do not use a pump. The benefits of pump therapy that works well are many. That's not to say that some people have brilliant results using a basal bolus regimen.

 

Jjackie

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HollyB

Hi,

 

I am a big pump fan but do feel compelled to say that my son, who is 14 and also sold on his pump, does say that set changes hurt more than pen injections. He had to take an injection the other day and kind of laughed. "That was like nothing. Remember when Dr. Hughes said site insertions don't hurt more than regular injections? That was such bull..."

 

He doesn't find them terrible or anything, and does hit the odd lucky spot that he says he barely feels. But it's something to be aware of, that not all kids will find them "painless" and if your child finds they hurt, you don't want to just dismiss that as histrionics. Another example of "everyone is different," I guess.

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brandon'smom
Hi Malcom my daughter was diagnosed at four years old and is now 12, she started on a pump 18 months ago and she would never want to go back to injections. I run an email support group for families with children with diabetes living in the UK. There are 125 members and a lot of these parents have young children using insulin pumps. I know that there are three Scottish members on the list who have insulin pumps. My daughter used to have severe hypos at night and had had a number of seisures in the past because she has no hypo awareness when asleep.

 

If you want to talk to UK parents with young children using pumps and MDI come and subscribe to the email support list. Details found here. Any problems with subscribing let me know. Its a busy active list

 

CWD UK Information Section

Email and Mailing Lists

 

children with DIABETES - CWD UK Information

 

I will like to know how fast can my son get a Pump I hear so many good thiings about it. I dont know why the people at the Hospital want s us to wait at least a YEAR ... Will see i will ask SOON!!

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