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Jon

My Kid Is Driving Me Crazy!

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Jon

I think it started last night. My son took his bedtime dose of Lantus, and tested his bg at 9:00 pm. His bg was 111. He asked me if he could stay up and watch a show on tv that isn't on until late. I said that since he got his homework done and his bg was good, he could stay up for the show.

 

In the morning, he was 117. At lunch he was 104. After school he was 127. Dinner reading was 133... Does anybody notice a pattern? Every one of those is within the control solution range! And his bg is never that good that many times in a row. So at bedtime, I watched him closely while he tested. He kept looking at me to see if I would look away, and when he tested, the meter said HIGH GLUCOSE, which is 600 or more.

 

He is not admitting to anything, but he must be using the control solution to make his readings look good. I am not sure why he feels like he needs to lie about his readings. I don't get mad or punish him when they are too high. He is rewarded when he remembers to test without me reminding him.

 

The other day, one of the school nurses assistants told me she was going to request to have somebody else supervise him, because she couldn't deal with him lying about what he is eating. Apparently he tried to hide his french fries from her. There is no good reason for that either. They are not supposed to tell him what to eat and what not to eat, they just count the carbs and calculate insulin.

 

It is frustrating, because at times, he seems old enough and mature enough for just about anything. Other times, I can't trust him at all.

 

I realize that he is just a typical teenager, but it is amazing to me that I haven't yet pulled out all of my hair.

 

-----End venting-----

 

:rolleyes:

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zookeeper671

Jon, I'm so sorry you're having to deal with this. Sounds like your son has the "it'll never happen to me" attitude about diabetes complications. Hopefully his need to rebel toward the disease will end soon.

 

Hugs,

Angie

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Belinda

WOW!!! Kind of sounds like me at that age!!!!

Solution one is to hide the meter solution and then you will know what he test hopefully. I am sure he doesn't want input from stangers but maybe ask his Doctor to have another diabetic talk to him that has experienced problems with diabetes. Hats off to you for trying your best.

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kcwinter

I'm so sorry Jon. It might be one of these things when you just keep talking until your blue in the face. :). Good luck

 

kcwinter

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Shalyndria

Yeah the good old control solution trick...been there done that got the T-shirt it said :stupid: When I was about 16-ish, I didn't test at all for 2 years. Since you can't slip that one past the doctors or my all-seeing mother, I'd use control solution or I'd just write numbers that sounded good in my logbook. All it would take is fiddling around a little, make it look like I was doing it. And I was old enough to know better. Why did I lie? Sheer laziness and denial; testing BG's was a sign of my disease and high BG's meant I'd have to actually work at control. Much easier to ignore it.

Frankly, at that age and your sons age Jon, we think we're invincible. You can tell him all about the complications he risks in ten years and it will go in one ear and right out the other. I always told myself nothing like that could ever possibly happen to me; I was fortunate my A1c's stayed below 9.

 

I'm not a parent, but my advice, since I can understand how your son feels, is to never accuse him of not checking his BG's or taking care of himself. You will only succeed in alienating him. Belinda's idea to hide the control solution is a good one. You also might try (cost allowing) checking your own BG at the same time he does it, so that he doesn't feel so different.

 

And hey, vent away that's what we're here for.

 

Shy

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DeusXM

Might be interesting if you could get your clinic to put you in contact with one of their more 'disasterous' patients.

 

When I was dxd at 14, although i never seriously thought fiddling the bg numbers was a viable option, I think I probably didn't take my condition very seriously. To some extent, I guess I still don't, but when I was 16 I got a bit of a sharp shock that certainly changed my thinking.

 

When I was 16 I got moved up from the juvenile clinic to the adult one, and I'm sure you don't need me to tell you that's where you see the real fallout.

 

People who have to have oxygen masks put on them every couple of minutes because they can't physically breathe for themselves long enough. People with no legs. People carrying CRATES of pills home with them, but will only last them for 2 weeks because they have to take 10 different drugs a day. People who can't comprehend why they should control their condition. In short, people who have destroyed themselves because they seemed to think the normal rules of untreated diabetes and its complications wouldn't apply to them.

 

Every time I go to clinic and I see these people and puts me in a massive depression for a bit. Then I check my bg, find its not too bad, and I think 'it doesn't have to be like that.'

 

Those people at the clinic are 'diabetics'. As long as I keep my control, I'm not a diabetic. I'm a person with diabetes.

 

Seeing those people was the slap in the face I needed to understand and see things a bit more clearly.

 

Might be worth a try.

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mg_2204

... hard for us adults to look reality straight in the face so imagine when you're a kid! Mine have a zit on their face it's the end of the world. Childhood isn't that blessed time of life you know... it's a jungle out there for kids (school mainly). Peer pressure, trying to fit in, and figuring out who you are... where you're going... and so on. I can't help but feel for the little guy you know! But as a parent, I totally understand your worries Jon. Sometimes you must feel like pulling all your hair out.

 

Is there such a thing as a support group for young people with diabetes by the way? We get to vent here... but what about the kids?

 

I think you've had really great suggestions and advice from the pros who posted before me.

 

Feel free to vent anytime!

 

Marie

:)

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Andrea

Jon,

 

How frustrating for you when you are trying to be so supportive of your son. Does he know any other kids, his age or even a bit older who also have diabetes? I was lucky in that i was diagnosed at 21 so i missed those teenage years of trying to fool my parents and doctors. But even having completely accepted the disease, it has made such a difference to me to have friends who have to deal with the daily trials of fluctuating blood glucose levels. Maybe his endo could put him in touch with another one of his patients or perhaps your local children's hospital would have a support group for teens.

 

One of the worst things that i found when i was first diagnosed is that you feel that nobody around you really knows what you are going through, unless they have type 1 diabetes as well. I know his mum has diabetes, but because she doesn't manage it in the same way that you are trying to help your son manage his, and because she is his mother, it might be nice for him to meet some others.

 

Andrea

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Lorna

OK, not sure how useful this is going to be, but I am going to try. First point, obviously you know your son and I don't , but is it the best of ideas to allow the school nurse to supervise him all the time? My thinking is that as a 13 (that is what age he is isn't it?) being supervised all the time is something which is likely to alienate him and something the other kids are going to notice, hence it is likely to be frustrating for your son. He is also likely to work at finding some way to rebell against it.

 

You may also want to speak to your son and the school nurse about exactly what she is saying to him. Without trying to critisise what is obviously very hard work, it is my experience that health care professionals who are not Diabetes specialists often have ideas about Diabetes and diet which are about 10years out of date (particularly towards DAFNE). It is also my experiece that these people (many of whom are friends) often critisise (ie you're not supposed to be eathing that) without realising what they are doing or how annoying it is. Are you certain this was not the reason he decided to hide the French Fries?

 

Another suggestion on that theme is that he hid them for psychological reasons. I sometimes go through stages (and a friend who does not have diabetes but has had to battle against her wieght for years admited to the same thing) when I seem to beleive that if noone sees me eating the food it won't do me any harm (Don't ask me why. If anyone can explain this, please let me know!)

 

As for the control solution on the meter, difficult one. I think everyone does this at some time in their life. Hding the solution sounds like a good idea, but beware that there are other ways around that, such as diluting the blood, or putting the strip back into the meter after it has given the reading.

 

Long term complications may be too far away for him to think about right now, but is there no way of making him realise that he will feel better in the short term if his bgs are a bit lower. (It is not pleasent to be 600 and feeling like you are dehydrating to death, and I also know that I started feeling loads better after I managed to drop my HBA1C by 3% about 18months ago.)

 

Sorry if this has been load of useless information, or given you more to worry about.

 

Good Luck

Lorna

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DDR_Freak88

heres a suggestion coming form a 15 yer old with it, i use a pump, i donno what goes on but if you can afford to get one (i no that kinda sounds rude and all but its in a "non rude" way) but think of how it is perfect for him:

A:he likes to hide food, with a pump you can just take insulin with everything you eat.

B: the prob with the meter would prob be just to take the solution away, or try not to punish him if he's high, you know he did somethign wrong so you might as well not get yourself over reacted by it.

C: SEND HIM TO CAMP!!! i went to joslin, its is an awesome camp, cool people and they have you under coontrol I prob never hit over 175 while being there 3 weeeks.

 

i hope this helps a lil u can im me if u need more

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buzz23148

Im fourteen and Im a counselor in training at a camp in missouri for kids with problems (family, drugs, depression and so on) I was recently diagnosed with type one and reading your post you said he could watch TV because he did his homework and his bg was good, I know if my mom told me this I would surely try to keep my bg in range and maybe his wasnt so he decided to cheat abit, you just have to make sure that you dont treat your bg levels as a grade or a reason to give punishment, they are just a number to help you realize patterns and trends so that you can keep yourself in check. If he ever wants to talk contact me at buzz23148@msn.com or if you can you can chat to me on msn messanger at the same addres, hope this helps, Patrick

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Lee73

Hi Jon,

 

Buzz23...offers some very sound advice and it comes from someone who is closer to your son's age so perhaps it is even more valuable.

I had the reverse problem, I grew up with a diabetic father and also a diabetic sister (she was dxed at age 9). Our house was pretty crazy most of the time. How long has your son had diabetes? I know it took my sister a while to become comfortable with having diabetes. She sort of raged against the idea for the better part of her teens. Hormones had a lot to do with that, just like with all teenagers (we were four teenaged girls at one point) but my sister had the added stress and pressure of keeping her readings level and saying no to foods her friends were eating and taking insulin. It is a tough time.

We dealt with diabetes as a family. When my sister was dxed, it was almost as if we all were dxed. For example, we all ate a diabetic diet. My mom kept sugary sweets out of the house and my other sisters and I tested our blood sugar on occasion. In other words, I guess we did as much as we could so that my sister was not alienated. We showed solidarity with her and my dad. But, my sister needed it more at that time.

I am guessing, but your son probably feels a good deal of alienation, especially if he is having to go to the nurse at school, where other kids only do that if they are "sick". Yes, he will have to accept his differences, but it is great to place an emphasis on the similarities. Maybe the whole family could eat what he eats and test their b/s every now and then.

Hang in there. It is not an easy time, but it will get better.

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Patches_J

Not only do I have a teenage soon who is Type 1 diabetic, but I also work in an endocrinology clinic.

 

I have seen teens use control solutions, pay younger/older siblings to test their blood glucose, inject insulin into the couch, the family pet, you name it.

 

I think a lot of it besides the fact that they're teenagers and invinsible is the fact that trying to fit in is hard enough at that age without the added injections and testing and dietary restrictions. It's easier to hide it away so that it's not a common topic among peers.

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buzz23148

patches has a good point in that its hard to try to fit in when your a teenager and being diabetic makes it all the more difficult, I never had this problem because I dont go with the crowd anyways and its just another way that I am uniqe, I think its kind of cool. But if you are trying to fit in being diabetic would certainly put a damper on things, I would tell him to be proud of it, hes a healthier person, and its a way that he stands out, make sure he knows its nothing to hide, hes still the same person

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