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Daniel1959

Night time checks

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Daniel1959

How often do you check your child at night. I check at 12:00 am and 2:00 am most of the time. If things have been going real good for a while I might just check at midnight. He usually has a snack and bolus at 8:30. I was just wondering what was the normal routine.

 

Dan

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belyro

I don't have kids, but my parents used to check me at 11:00 and 6:00. Also often at 2:00 or 3:00, depending on how the 11:00 one was.

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JediSkipdogg

I was a huge pain as a kid, so my parents didn't check me at night. Unfortunately I was on NPH then and quite often I had insulin reactions at night if I didn't have a large enough bed time snack.

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ProudMOM

Either my husband or myself checks our 15 y.o. son every night at 2:00 a.m.

He is very active in sports and blood sugars can be somewhat unpredictable with his activity level.

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samsmom

I check my son when he goes to bed (8 p.m.) and then I check him when I go to bed (12 p.m.) if he needs a correction at that time, I will check him 3 hours later. If he is low, I treat the low and check on him an hour later......If I find that for a few days he is waking up high, I know that it must be a rebound high and I do some overnight checking, every other hour...the next day to the other hours......its a pain in the butt, he is growing so much lately and this is messing with his numbers....when he was dx at 15mo old, we checked him just about every 2 hrs at night......

 

shannon

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lgvincent

I tend to check about 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, and 2:00 because my blood sugar tends to either drop or climb after 10:00 in the evening.

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Eri's mom

I check Eri around 12:30, then around 3/3:30...and then when she wakes up at 6:45/7.I do that just so it's one less thing she has to do while running around getting ready(girls...ugh!) I WAS checking her every hour/hour and a half last week(and do when she is sick)...which was exhausting...b/c I was doing A LOT of corrections w/ her)...but now just those 2 times during the night.

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HollyB

Yikes, now I'm kinda worried that we are too slack. We only spot-check Aaron once every couple of weeks, and check once or twice a night if anything odd is going on, like changing his basals, big exercise day, sick with erratic sugars, unusual waking readings or if he took a big bolus close to his bedtime and I want to make sure it doesn't send him low. I guess that can add up to fairly often, but I often get weeks at a time with very few night checks.

 

It is what I worry about when he heads out on his own. Right now, waking him in the middle of the night is like waking the dead -- I remember right after diagnosis having a panicky "OMG he's in a coma" thought. But no, he's just a teenage boy who sleeps hard. It's hard for me to picture him setting an alarm and waking up to check himself...

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Eri's mom

I test Eri a lot b/c she's been sick a lot...especially since we moved back up north. I used to just check around 3 am(or it used to be 1:30 am when she was first dx'd). That was when she was 6.

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Type1Mum

It depends on what Jack (12yo) has been up to. He is very active, so most nights I check b/w 2-3am, but when he's been veging out in front of the computer during the holidays, and his levels are good, I won't check him during the night. He has been growing v quickly since he was diagnosed (10cm in height since May), his insuling requirements are now starting to increase as puberty is starting to kick in, so I might need to change my checking regime. It really depends on the activity level during the day.

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right2fight

I don't think you're too slack at all. At 14 your son should be able to recognize what's going on with his body. I depend on my son, who's 13 to treat himself and it's amazing how well he does. You know one day they do go off on their own, and our job is to prepare them.

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HollyB

Yeah, thanks for that. He is really on top of things. He will come and ask me to check him if he's a bit worried about his levels at bedtime, so he knows when it's a good idea. It's more that he just can't make himself wake up -- but I think that gets easier once past the teen growth spurt. I hope!

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right2fight

Hey Holly, I guess I'm fortunate, my son always has woke up when experiencing hypos, and he too is on top of his regimen. I'm proud of him. Instead of crying all the time, he has accepted his condition and learned all he can to manage it. While it's not always perfect and at times he consumes too many PB crackers while at school, over all he's doing great. I think we parents, sometimes do not give our wee ones enough credit. Believe me when push comes to shove they can do anything, especially if we BELIEVE!

 

Margaret

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Mama Belle

I check my daughter pretty much the same way Shannon checks her son. It all kinda depends on how she is trending. If she is low or needs a correction, I set an alarm (or two, or three) to get up and re-check. If she is looking good and trending okay I check before I go to bed and first thing when I wake up (6:30 am). Luckily my daughter tends to wake up with middle of the night hypos, but seems less aware of early morning hypos. What worries me is that her dad (we're divorced) does not do this, in fact he checks her BG usually only once after her dinner and shot and that is right before bed. He won't check again before he goes to bed. I have talked to him about this until I am blue in the face and he doesn't seem to understand that checking her once at 8:30 isn't going to tell him much about where her BG is headed.

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samsmom

My son does not feel his lows so we check him at night. The endo said that some kids just don't feel them. A lot of teenagers do not feel them either. I hope he starts feeling the lows but if he doesn't, I (or hubby) will continue to check him during the night. These kids have a lifetime to deal with this so what ever I can do to make it easier right now I will......

 

shannon

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claysmum

Well, I knew it was inevidable, but it happended last ngiht.:frown:

He went into seizure like mode, I tried to check his blood and his moniter just said error. (New so I have to check if it has low reading)

It was awful, he just kept asking for mommie and daddie...UGH!

I ended up calling 911 when I figured it out, within a minute and they came pretty fast but not fast enough....

 

I hope he does not have any ill effects from this, but seems to be fine...just sluggish this am. We have cut down his insuling 40% and boluses are halved until he gets his sugar store back in Liver?

 

Sigh...does this seem to be right

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dekockc

I am so afraid of an undetected night time hypo, that I never let my son go to sleep (he is 7 years old) if BS is below 10Mmol (180 mg in your terms). I give a small snack or small glass of milk to ensure it is 10 when he goes to sleep. For example, he goes to sleep at 20H30 and when I test and he is, say, 5.0 Mmol ( 90 mg/l in your terms,), I give him a snack of 15g carbs which raises his BS by exactly 5.0 Mmol to get to 10 Mmol (180 mg/l)Therefore I have never had a problem during the night. If he is 7 Mmol (126 mg/l) I give him a snack of about 7g carbs. I have to add that he eats at 17H30 and we bolus with Novorapid (i think you call it Novolog) for the exact carb contect. This makes life fairly predictable. It also helps that he is only 7 and I can therefore still control his lifestyle and food etc. I know this will probably change!

 

I give him his Levemir injection at 21H30 when he is already asleep. Having said all of the above, he does wake up with a morning BS of around 8 or 9 Mmol (144 mg to 162mg) which I know is not ideal and is higher than the pre-prandial recommended number of between 4 and 6, but daytime sugars are very good thereafter and in the recommended ranges (Well ..... 80% of the time). We correct the sligthly higher sugar at breakfast time which is at 06H30. Our Diabetes doctor has recommended that it is safer for the very small children to have a slightly higher BS during night to prevent emergencies. My son has been diabetic for a year now and fortunately has never been ill - not even a cold - I guess that will present a whole new challenge and will probably necessitate night time checking as well.

 

Sorry for the long story and hope this is of any help to parents having to get up so often at night- every family is different and every person reacts differently to food and insulin. I am just stating what works for us and what our doctor has recommended. My husband and I do get up every night as a matter of course just to check on him and feel his forehead for cold and clamminess, but we do not test BS during the night. BTW, he is not on a pump, but on MDI's - Humulin R in the morning, Novorapid at lunch and dinner time and Levemir for Basal insulin.

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claysmum

I forgot to mention that I checked his blood at 10:30 and it was 7.5. He went into this severe low at 11:30. I always check at midnight and 3 am just to make sure he is WNL. It was crazy how fast he dropped. I dont understand. It must have been a mistake in calculating his carbs, but his last bolus was at 7 pm. You would think that the insulin would be out of his system...at least close to very out by then...

:hmmmm:

 

He is fine now but noneless it was very scary!! Needless to say I did not sleep last night... sigh

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HollyB

That is so frightening. Aaron actually recently had a similar inexplicable BS drop -- he had gone to bed at 11 with a BS of over 7, a tiny bit of insulin on board and a snack more than enough to cover it. He was reading (thank goodness) and went low well before midnight.

 

Those random things that don't make sense.... crazy making.

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SwimMom

My daughter recently got her pump, so we checking at 2:00 a.m. now. When she was taking shots, I rarely checked her during the night unless she was ill or had been unusually active, etc. She wakes up and lets us know when she feels low. I always check if she has a nightmare or wakes for any reason because it is unusual for her.

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diamum

we check our son (7) before we go to bed, we used to check once or twice during the night but now when the pump is well adjusted we don't need to unless we don't like the last reading

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GPF

We're on the pump. However, I still test at 9pm. Most nights he is in bed by 7pm. If the number doesn't leave me with a comfort margin.. a few carbs with something fatty like cream cheese to carry them. Then test again 30 min later. And depending on how he is sleeping periodic testing through the night and into the morning.

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type1since82
Yikes, now I'm kinda worried that we are too slack. We only spot-check Aaron once every couple of weeks, and check once or twice a night if anything odd is going on, like changing his basals, big exercise day, sick with erratic sugars, unusual waking readings or if he took a big bolus close to his bedtime and I want to make sure it doesn't send him low. I guess that can add up to fairly often, but I often get weeks at a time with very few night checks.

 

It is what I worry about when he heads out on his own. Right now, waking him in the middle of the night is like waking the dead -- I remember right after diagnosis having a panicky "OMG he's in a coma" thought. But no, he's just a teenage boy who sleeps hard. It's hard for me to picture him setting an alarm and waking up to check himself...

HollyB: I was dx at age 5 and I'm 29 now. My parents only sporadically checked my bs at night and I would have the occasional low in the AM, but you can't catch them all. I think you're ok not checking at night unless the numbers have been out of whack that day or recently or if he is sick.

As far as him not waking up at night - I was the EXACT same way. My dad set off the fire alarm and I didn't wake up - nice huh? But i was used to my parents waking me up my whole life. Once I got a job and had to be responsible for myself, I was ok waking up. Now I'm married and I wake up to our puppies whimpering downstairs before my husband does. It's all about what you program your brain to think is important - I have to get to work on time... important. If I don't take the dogs out in time, they'll have an accident... important. I set an alarm to test my bs at 2am because I have reason to believe I might be low... you get the idea. I think your son will be the same way once he gets a little older and has reason besides school to get up. I just had to comment because I was the hardest sleeper I knew and I eventually learned :)

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