Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Chuck

[B]Baby Aspirin[/B]

Do You Use Baby (or 81 mg) Aspirin  

17 members have voted

  1. 1. Do You Use Baby (or 81 mg) Aspirin

    • Yes, I do
      10
    • No, I do not
      7
    • Never Considered This
      0
    • Allergic To Aspirin
      0


Recommended Posts

Chuck

My Internist placed me on a daily 81 mg (or Baby) Aspirin.

 

I am curious as what other diabetic are using. I had never been asked about this before and as the benefits freatly outway the disadvantages, I am happy iusing this medication.

 

I know that a lot of folks are allergic to a lot of medications, so, I am wondering first of all, are you allergic (Yes or No), if not, do you take an 81 mg. (or Baby) aspirin to ward off heart problems.

 

Don't want to appear as though I am prying into other peoples backgrounds, but, this seemed like a good question to ask of everyone.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rzrbks

Aspirin is one way to protect you from Heart/vascular problems-----I've been on 325 mg aspirin since my heart attack 7 years ago--was caused by stress--all indicators, according to Cardiologists, were Very Good --meaning that I shouldn't have had Heart attack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HeatherP

Hi Chuck. My doc had me start taking it several years ago, along w/ a multivitamin.

 

Another good question: Are you or have you discussed starting on some blood pressure meds to slow down kidney damage? I just started w/ a new dr and she put me on Lisinopril 5 mg/day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deager

When I saw this post, I immeadiately turned to Jack and asked him if he was out of baby aspirin (I knew he was getting low a week ago and this reminded me to ask if he needed more yet) and he said he hadn't been taking it for a few days as he noticed when he tests he bleeds for several minutes afterword and was worried his blood might be getting too thin.

 

He sees his doc soon, but I wondered if anyone else had noticed this?

 

81mg seems awfully low to cause something like that. Perhaps it has to do with his glucose control.

 

Also, Jack has high blood pressure and takes Altace for it. The help with the kidneys is a plus.

 

Diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chuck

I have heard of some using 325 mg Aspirin and having this kind of problem.

 

Does Jack take any other medications that might act as a blood thinner, as this might be causing this type of problem.

 

I do not have this difficulty myself.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SunniD

I tried aspirin theraphy after I went to a medical conference which stated that type 1 diabetics run a 80% risk of having a heart episode before the age of 55 and I'm coming 50. Anyhow,

I swell and bruise so badly from the 81 mg of aspirin that I couldn't take it for long.

 

A doctor with medical knowledge of alternative medicine told me I would be doing more benefit if I took a good multivitamin/mineral regime with added Vitamin E and I believe him. Vit E helps protect the bodies supply of Vit A and also helps maintain body cells and muscles in a healthy state.

 

I do believe that aspirin does help people prevent heart episodes but some of us with allergies or adverse rxns need to use alternatives to help us out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harold

Diane,

 

What kind of bg readings with this thin blood are we seeing?

 

High bg's are associated with thick blood. A bg of 170 mg/dl would be about as thick as Karo syrup. So unless he has become anemic it's probably okay as long as he is not too low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harold

Apparently there has been a challenge to my previous post about high bg's causing blood to thicken.

Didn't want to be rude and post a comment on your thick and thin blood referring to levels of bgs -they are not connected and this is a false statement.

First I am Not offended :) and I love challenges to my post. For two reasons the first they keep me on my toes and secondly my knowledge current. :D So please everyone feel free to ask me for references anytime to any post. :cool:

 

The reference to the 170 and Karo syrup was something taught to me in diabetes classes. So I had no reference, still don't, to the accuracy of it. However, we get to learn something new here :cool: , there happens to be a term for blood thickened by HIGH bg's condition called Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome (DHS) .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deager

Chuck,

 

He takes Altace for HBP....would that thin his blood? His doc recently upped his dosage to 2 pills a day. Hmmmm......food for thought. (Funny how you sometimes don't see something til it is in black and white before your eyes...).

 

Harold,

 

His BG readings have been all over the place. 410 in the am the other morning and 49 at lunch 4 hours later. We are getting a handle on that I believe.....4 normal readings out of 6 yesterday (YES YES YES YES) but his blood is pretty thick (the karo syrup theory?)....it is just that he bleeds for a couple of minutes. He's ratcheted his lancet down twice now (only one more dot to go before it is at the lowest setting!) with the same result.

 

Ygads.....what a journey.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chuck

Harold,

 

That is something that I have not been exposed to either, so, as you have said, learning new things is both good and very helpful.

 

The reference to Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome (DHS) is also new to me, and never having experences, or not knowing, if I may have experienced it, this to is a new thing to me.

 

As to Deager's reference to Altace, I am not certain of what else this medication does, but, a good place to look for this sort of information is:

 

http://www.healthtouch.com

 

which is a good, and well written and easliy understandable reference where you can check your meds.

 

Altace is a blood pressure medicine and an ACE inhibitor, and should not act as a blood thinner. The information I have feviewed does not indicate it should act as a blood thinner, but, if you are uncertain, ask your pharmacist or physicain, which is always the best choice to make anyway.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harold

Chuck,

 

There is a big difference between the 170 I was taught and the DHS value given. Heck I even found a differences between sites on values given for DHS 600+ to 780. Makes me wonder if the class values were ment to scare. Then maybe there are widely different opinions on this between the professionals. In just the three years I been reading about diabetes there have been changes to the accepted knowledge base. So keeping up with it becomes difficult which shows the importance of forums like this. The influence of newly dx'd asking questions keeps us on our toes.

 

One of the things I noticed in my reading was the lack of how high bg's cause complications. With the exception of kidney damage they become rather vague and usually just say high bg's cause damage. There was one article that said that cells may die from the lack of glucose, but other than the kidney that was as far as it went. So many of the mechanisms of this desease are still unknown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SunniD

Just wanted to add my 2 cents worth too for Harold<smile>

and perhaps clear up a few things hopefully or confuse them more.*g* Glad to see Harold has a good sense of humor as well

and I'll try and be good Harold.<smile>

 

Not all Diabetics are suffering from DHS (Diabetic Hyperosmolar Syndrome) when they have low or high bgs.

 

The following is from a book named How to Prevent and Treat Diabetes with Natural Medicine.

 

Contributors to the Longe-Term Complications of Diabetes fall into the following categories:

Poor Glucose control

Glycosylation of proteins

Intracellular accumilation of sorbitol

Increased oxidative damage

Nutrient deficiency

Homocycsteine

High Blood Pressure

 

I wanted to go into more detail on Intracellular accumalation of sorbitol. Sorbitol is a sugar molecule that is formed from glucose

within cells. In people without diabetes, once sorbitol is formed it is quickly broken down into fructose, another simple sugar. This

conversion to fructose is critical becuase it allows any excess sorbitol to be excreted from the cell, and sorbitol cannot exit the cell once it is formed. Increased sorbitol levels within the cells create an osmotic effect.

 

Osmosis refers to the movement of water molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.

The cell works hard to maintain the conc. of water within cells.

When there is an increase in the conc. of soluble compounds (such as sorbitol) that the cell can't get rid of. The cell will leak out small molecules such as amino acids, inositol, glutathione, niacin, vit. C, mg, and potassium to maintain osmotic balance. Since these compounds function to protect cells from damage, their loss results in increased susceptibility to damage.

 

Intracellular accumilation of sorbitol is a major factor in the development of the majority of the complications of diabetes,as evidenced by the fact that elevated sorbitol levels are found

in the tissues commonly involved in diabetic complications:

the lens of the eye, nerve cells, kidney cells, and the cells that line blood vessels.

 

In addition to controlling the blood sugar levels, vit. C , flavonoids such as quercetin, grapeseed extract , and bilberry extract can help lower intracellular sorbitol levels.

 

This is taken from a book by Dr. Michael Murray N.D. (nutritional doc) and Dr. Michael Lyon M.D. (medical doc)

 

So on conclusion, only a few diabetics are in this condition and generally arrive in emerg in a state of DHS and in ketosis.

The rest of us still are functioning somewhat normally <smile>.

 

I take the recommended Vit C (approx. 2000 mg/day) to get rid of high sorbitol levels in my cells. Vit. C also requires insulin to enter most cells. A low level of insulin may result in a low level of Vit. C inside of the cells. People with diabetes have problems converting a particular vitamin to its active form, or may tend to convert a particular vitamin, such as Vit. C, to a less active form.

 

Vitamin C also lowers ones Hgb A1C as well as getting rid of high sorbitol levels in diabetics. I've learned this thru alternative medicine and I believe spreading that knowledge would help many diabetics avoid some of the complications of diabetes.

Some of the things we can change that help us the most are things that we eat and supplements as diabetics are low in a number of nutrients.

 

SunniD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chuck

I have read some information on the benefits of taking Vitamin C, and how this benefits us (meaning Diabetics), in helping to lower and normalize our Hemoglobin A1C levels.

 

This is interesting, and useful information.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deager

Sunni,

 

Thanks for that info. I've seen that book.....now I want it. That was very interesting about sorbitol.

 

Diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.