Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Emmasmommy

A1c

Recommended Posts

Emmasmommy

Hi all well today Emma went for her 2 month A1C and it was 8.1 they are thrilled and so was I untill I found a chart that tells you what that means in regards to av. bg 8.1=11.8 Not as good as they said it was !!! They said that her target for her age is 9.0 and that the clinic av. is 8.3 so they are very happy. My question for all you parents out there is what have your kids A1C been and what does your clinc want them at. (more directed at young kids)

 

Heres the chart if anyone is interested.

 

Hb-A1c 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9

mg/dl 65 69 72 76 79 83 86 90 93 97

 

mmol/l 3.6 3.8 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9

mg/dl 101 104 108 111 115 118 122 126 129 133

 

mmol/l 5.6 5.8 6.0 6.2 6.4 6.6 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9

mg/dl 136 140 143 147 151 154 158 161 165 168

 

mmol/l 7.6 7.8 8.0 8.2 8.4 8.6 8.8 9.0 9.2 9.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9

mg/dl 172 176 180 183 186 190 193 197 200 204

 

mmol/l 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.2 10.4 10.6 10.8 11.0 11.2 11.4

 

Hb-A1c 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9

mg/dl 207 211 215 218 222 225 229 232 236 240

 

mmol/l 11.6 11.8 12.0 12.2 12.4 12.6 12.8 13.0 13.2 13.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 13.5

mg/dl 243 261 279 297 314 332 350 368 386 403

 

mmol/l 13.6 14.6 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.5 19.5 20.4 21.4 22.4

 

Blue is US bg and Red is Canadian

 

Hope this helps some

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Emmasmommy
Hidden

I posted this in the parents thread as well but thought more ppl might respond here:

Hi all well today Emma went for her 2 month A1C and it was 8.1 they are thrilled and so was I untill I found a chart that tells you what that means in regards to av. bg 8.1=11.8 Not as good as they said it was !!! They said that her target for her age is 9.0 and that the clinic av. is 8.3 so they are very happy. My question for all you parents out there is what have your kids A1C been and what does your clinc want them at. (more directed at young kids)

 

Heres the chart if anyone is interested.

 

Hb-A1c 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9

mg/dl 65 69 72 76 79 83 86 90 93 97

 

mmol/l 3.6 3.8 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9

mg/dl 101 104 108 111 115 118 122 126 129 133

 

mmol/l 5.6 5.8 6.0 6.2 6.4 6.6 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9

mg/dl 136 140 143 147 151 154 158 161 165 168

 

mmol/l 7.6 7.8 8.0 8.2 8.4 8.6 8.8 9.0 9.2 9.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9

mg/dl 172 176 180 183 186 190 193 197 200 204

 

mmol/l 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.2 10.4 10.6 10.8 11.0 11.2 11.4

 

Hb-A1c 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9

mg/dl 207 211 215 218 222 225 229 232 236 240

 

mmol/l 11.6 11.8 12.0 12.2 12.4 12.6 12.8 13.0 13.2 13.4

 

 

Hb-A1c 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 13.5

mg/dl 243 261 279 297 314 332 350 368 386 403

 

mmol/l 13.6 14.6 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.5 19.5 20.4 21.4 22.4

 

Blue is US bg and Red is Canadian

If you want to view this as a full table go to The Bernstein Hb-A1c to Average Blood Glucose Conversion Table, in mg/dl and mmol/l

Hope this helps some

Share this post


Link to post
SueM

Hiya I was always told that childrens A1c's are kept slightly higher due to the amount of exercise/growth/food needed by a growing child. The slightly higher A1c is a safe guard against bad hypo's.

Sounds as if you and your little one are doing a great job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
diamum

My sons last check up showed 7,2 we think thats great our clinic said under 7 would be perfect but 7,2 is excellent.. before he's been between 8-9 and that has always been excepted. He is 7yrs

 

This varies a lot from person to person and what is good for one might not be for another depending on how easy they are to regulate.. and often the hba1c is not what you expect when you go to check it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mark-TN

It is important to remember that the A1c test has not been standardized yet (and probably never will be). Each lab will have a different reference range depending on the machine and essay they use. So even if your A1c is the exact same number as someone else’s they could mean totally different things. It is important to look at the reference range for the lab that does your A1c test and to ask the lab or your doctor for the correct formula (or chart) that corresponds to the lab result.

 

Bernstein uses the following formula (also corresponds to the chart the ADA uses):

 

(A1c x 35.6)-77.3=Estimated Average Blood Glucose

or

(average blood glucose + 77.3) / 35.6 = Estimated A1c

 

Another easy way to remember this formula (or chart) with out actually remembering the formula (or chart) is to remember this simple rule: An A1c of 5.0 = 100 mg/dl, every full % variance from this equals +/- 35 mg/dl. So an A1c of 6.0% = 100 +(1 x 35) or 135mg/dl. An A1c of 6.5% = 100 + (1.5 x 35) or 153mg/ dl. An A1c of 4.9% = 100 –(.1 x 35) or 97mg/dl, etc.

 

The formula that corresponds to the lab my doctor uses is totally different:

 

(A1c x 33.3)-86= Estimated Average Blood Glucose

or

(average blood glucose + 86) / 33.3 = Estimated A1c

 

So be sure to get the reference range from your doctor and make sure you ask him/her what formula (or chart) corresponds to their labs A1c value. It may be the same as one of the above or it may be totally different, but you will only know if you ask.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LarryTango

well i checked mine today ..

 

Result: An HbA1c of 5.1 is equal to an average blood glucose of 104.26 mg/dL. Great control!

 

 

so i thought i see what else it said ...

 

Result: An HbA1c of 2.2 is equal to an average blood glucose of 1.02 mg/dL. Great control!

 

 

hmmm lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fgummett
Hi all well today Emma went for her 2 month A1C and it was 8.1 they are thrilled and so was I untill I found a chart that tells you what that means in regards to av. bg 8.1=11.8 Not as good as they said it was !!! They said that her target for her age is 9.0 and that the clinic av. is 8.3 so they are very happy. My question for all you parents out there is what have your kids A1C been and what does your clinc want them at. (more directed at young kids)
Although I am the Dad of a near 18 year old son, he does not have Type 1. I am also not a Pediatrician, let alone one specialising in Type 1 BUT I am concerned that what the clinic tell you is good may not be the ideal...

I consider myself widely read on the subject of D but most of that reading deals with adults; so perhaps the BG levels of a young child are very different from an adult... can anyone please advise?

 

It does seem that the health establishment guidelines for what constitutes a "normal" BG, especially for someone treated with insulin is very conservative in trying to avoid hypoglycemia... so much so, that we can end up with a distorted view of what constitutes "normal" BG.

 

I firmly believe that knowledge is power and a common theme here on DF is to take control, be proactive, and not necessarily follow along with what we are told at the various clinics; but to make up our own minds as to what is best for us.

 

Obviously I am talking from the standpoint of how I personally manage my own D, and not necessarily addressing the potential difficulties of managing someone else's D for them... the choices I make are compromises between quality of life and managing BG to improve my chances of living a long and healthy life, but the compromises I choose may not be right for someone else.

 

If this were my child, I would be concerned with the possibility that the BG is not being maintained as close to true normal as possible (without frequent Hypos) which over the course of years is likely to lead to complications. I would be doing a ton of reading on the subject of children and Type 1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cassini
There is also an a1c to average bg conversion calculator on this forum.

 

 

No matter what browser I use, I can not get the converter here to work for me.

 

Grrr

Cass:T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CaitE

When I was young, my A1Cs usually were around 8.5%. After asking my mom recently why no one pushed me to get the recommended levels of under 7% she explained that she was told by endos that too many lows can influence the brain development in children. Also, children need to learn to live and cope with diabetes and too many rules and restrictions can result in rebelious years as teens and poor management as adults. I'm sure as many know the teen years are hard enough as is, but try adding diabetes into the mix. Once Emma makes the transition from a pediatric approach to adult management the guidelines tighten!!!!!

 

You guys are doing great!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fgummett
When I was young, my A1Cs usually were around 8.5%. After asking my mom recently why no one pushed me to get the recommended levels of under 7% she explained that she was told by endos that too many lows can influence the brain development in children.
Those points are all important but most of us here know how high BGs also affect our physical and mental state... is that something to consider with children... surely nearer normal BGs are optimal so long as they can be maintained safely and reasonably?

 

As for compliance... I fully appreciate the issue with teenagers but I guess my approach with younger children would be to just make it part of the normal day to day routine like washing hands after the bathroom or playing with pets, or brushing teeth after food.

 

I'm not suggesting that our children become slaves to this disease but is it really a foregone conclusion that tighter control will always lead to more hypos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CaitE
I'm not suggesting that our children become slaves to this disease but is it really a foregone conclusion that tighter control will always lead to more hypos?

 

I think with young children who are Type I, with rapid growth, puberty, and lots of activity, lows can be more unpredictable and some children aren't as capable at identifying dropping or low sugars (especially during the night).

 

But I totally agree that everything needs to become second nature and just part of the "normal" day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RedRD

CaitE hit the nail on the head. My endo while growing up (she was also T1) insisted that my goal be an A1c above 7. All but maybe 2 of my most severe insulin reactions occured as a child (less than 13), and occured during the middle of the night. My parents started waking me up at 2-3am if my BG level was, say, below 100 at bedtime. No severe reactions (until pregancies) after that.

 

And as for compliance, as long as children are taught the importance of avoiding swings, and are taught how to treat highs and lows, they'll survive childhood and puberty. Hopefully, with their sanity. I know I was resentful of many parts of my childhood, because things were so stringent. That resentment can cost you more years of good control than a less-than-optimal A1c (in my opinion less than 9) for a few years will cost you in the long run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HollyB

Hi Shawna,

 

I really think toddlers are a whole different creature, even from young children. You cannot predict how much they will eat, or make them understand why they might NEED to eat. Their brains are growing at a fantastic rate. They probably can't yet identify lows or tell you very precisely how they are feeling. They are often extremely insulin sensitive (so you have to let them get pretty high before you correct, or you will plunge them way way down). For all these reasons, lows are more dangerous and harder to avoid. That's why the general guidelines is to run very small children higher.

 

I would definitely be hoping to lower her A1c a little as Emma gets older, but for now it sounds like you're doing a great job. I can hardly imagine how challenging it must be managing this disease in such a little person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RobiJo

I think at her age the A1c is pretty close to prefect. As she ages you can adjust your targets. (My opinion would be 7.5-8 for anyone under 10) Catching and preventing some spikes (perhaps after meals) may help you get it a bit lower.

 

You're doing a great job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
momofT1

After reading your signature and all you have to deal with regarding your kids' health, I said a little prayer for you and your family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
diabetesmomsam

we usually run around 8, which is still to high for our office, they want them running in mid 7's, although they consider a 6 the ideal for a type 1,

 

we struggle to stay at 8 and have been much higher;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
weejules83

hi there my four year old has been type one for almost 2 years and they have only recently started cracking down on his A1c which was 8.5 last week i think his lowest has only ever been around 7.5 so I wouldnt worry too much as the clinic think jacks doing really well. Sounds l;ike you are too especially at that age i know how difficult it is to keep their sugars under control. Once shes a bit older and a bit more active you should see a big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.