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Eri's mom

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Eri's mom

Hi all....

 

My daughter, Erica, is going through the "hyperglycemic" stage again. For the past 4 weeks, we have been battling readings of HI and in the 4-500's. She was actually 89 this morning, which was WONDERFUL...and she felt low.

We see her endo again this month, thank God.

We haven't dealt w/ any seizures in about a year, and the last time she was in the hospital was last July for DKA. That was the ONLY time they EVER admitted her to the hospital.

Even when she was dx'd, they sent us home from the doctor's office after a few hours...and her readings would NOT go below HI. It took 2 days just to see a reading of 548!!! Her A1C was 11.7...I was sort of shocked that she was never hospitalized b/c when I spoke to other parents after she was dx'd, they said that their children were admitted for up to a week w/ initial readings in the 300's. Don't get me wrong, it's not like I WANT her hospitalized, but I think it would have had more of an impact on her if she was.

When we were in NY for a wedding a few years ago she suffered one of her many hypoglycemic seizures...this one lasted about 10 minutes. We got her in to see an endo up there, and he started asking me questions like, "how long was she hospitalized when first dx'd?"...I said, she was NEVER had been...ok, slight shocked reaction from him there...then, the "how's her EKG's been?"...well, she had NEVER had one until that day....then of course the...how's her over all bloodwork been? Never had it done. I've seen 2 endo's down here. The doc's up north looked at me like I was from the dark ages.

We've gone through so much w/ her...especially the first few years after she was dx'd. Three months after being dx'd, she had her first seizure(I wasn't there b/c I was in NY w/ my husband and brother in law who was dx'd w/ liver cancer the same day Eri was dx''d w/ diabetes)...my mom and stepdad had the paramedics here, but they didn't take her to the hospital. Then, you could literally set your clock to her seizures...every 3-4 days apart...constant low's...and then going to the HI's. It's been quite a learning experience for us all. We watch what she eats, count carbs, etc...she exercises all the time...BUT, the HARDEST thing to get her to do is take her readings. I have to literally pin her down at times. Granted, her fingers are all sore, and I can't do arm tests b/c she bruises so easily and it looks like she's being beaten...we've used about every glucometer out there too....and lancet.

OK...I guess I'm venting, but I was wondering if anybody had any suggestions, etc for me.

I know I probably didn't make much sense...it's just she's been so out of sorts lately and I've been concerned.

The doc's here told me that certain tests aren't needed b/c it takes at least 5 yrs b/f any organs are affected.

Oh well...I'll stop babbling for now!!!

Thanks for listening!!!

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am1977

I feel for you...it must be tough raising a child with diabetes. I am type 1 too, but I was diagnosed at 24. It came about all of a sudden and when I finally was diagnosed I was almost relieved. I think I was relieved to know what the problem was and to know that I would start feeling better. The symptoms I was experiencing were very unpleasant, the never ending thirst, the frequent trips to the bathroom, feeling exhausted, and achey among other things. I'm sure you know those symptoms before your daughter was diagnosed. Anyway, I think I was lucky in that if I had to get diabetes, I am glad that I got it as a young adult and not a child. It's hard enough dealing with childhood issues and going through adolescense without also dealing with a chronic illness. Also as an adult, I am more mature and responsible than I was as a child. I don't think I would have been able to deal with it knowing how I was. I know dealing with the highs and lows is not easy and can be frustrating, but being diabetic by definition means having to deal with these things. It might be a good idea to call her Endo. or doctor for advice on what to do, especially when her numbers register "HI" on her moniter. I know how blood sugar can tend to bounce around, but I think the important thing is that you keep record of it and then also be in contact with her doctor.

 

I guess my advice to you would be to just try and be there for her. Let her vent about how she feels from time to time or ask her how she is feeling and how she is doing. She might want to try a support group herself or even something online. There is a site called children with diabetes, that is very good (www.childrenwithdiabetes.org) Also, give her time to enjoy being a kid. Let her have a day here and there where she doesn't have to worry about her numbers(of course, don't let her go overboard) but let her enjoy being a kid.

 

I hope that you will keep coming back and updating us on how things are going. You can babble all you want here, that's what this forum is here for.

 

Welcome again and take care,

 

andrea

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Eri's mom

Thanks so much :)

 

Yep, Eri went through all those symptoms too...and lost a ton of weight...

Eri's the type who is still angry w/ having diabetes(you'd think she'd be over it by now)...and she won't talk to other kids w/ it...she distances herself from them....she's sooooo dang stubborn!!!

 

I try talking to her about it, and she just gives major attitude. I think a lot has to do w/ her age and all, but still...enough is enough. I tell her she HAS to deal w/ it...get control...it's not only up to me, she has to be a part of it.

We've been to support groups, watched specials, read books, etc, and she's like, "yeah, whatever...I'll deal w/ that when I get there"...she's older than her years and sooooo stubborn.

(Oh yeah, we did even take her to a psychologist and a psychiatrist...she asked them why they either just talked to me or had her play games b/c it was just a waste of both her time and theirs...she was 8 then)

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PepsiLvr

Hello, I know it's hard to be going through all this. I was dxd in January as a type 1 at the age of 24 and it was defanitely a shock my A1C was 13.5 and I was never hospitalized. I can only imagine how difficult it must be for a child. I have some advsie and some questions for you. First, how does she handle the injections? You said that it is hard to get her to take her readings. I know that after injections the readings were the easy part for me. As far as lancets go, I found the most pain-free ones are the BD Ultra 33 lancets (they are even thinner than the insulin syringe) As far as getting her to take control and accept the condition, you may want to remind her of the long term effects of high BG levels and the problems that can arrise from them (readings of over 250 for any amount of time is definatley cause for concern) I know they also have diabetes camps for childern but she sounds like the type that will object to the idea. Anyway, just a few comments. I hope this was helpful. Good luck and hang in there!

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Eri's mom

Thanks so much for your response and advice :)

Let's see...she handle's her injections GREAT...they NEVER phased her...not even her first one. She was fine w/ the testing until her fingers were all sore, and she was so happy when we got the one(s) where she could prick her arm, but that didn't last long since she bruised so badly and it took forever to get enough blood.

I remind her a lot of what the long term affects can be...examples:

she can lose her sight, and her response : well, then I'll just get a seeing eye dog like uncle Jim(he lost his vision due to something else)....then, what if you have to have your foot/feet amputated, and she says, well, then I'll have a cool wheelchair, then, well, you could end up on dialysis, and she is like, SO???....and she already knows the hereditary play w/ her heart...there is heart disease on both sides of the family, she already has the heart murmur that is getting more and more noticable, etc. She has that "Oh well" attitude...drives me nuts!!!

We're discussing camps, and she told me she WON'T go, but she'll have no choice.

She's one stubborn girl(does NOT get that from me...LOL)....

She has an answer for just about ANYTHING....

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PepsiLvr

I'm kind of the same way. I still cringe before I prick my finger and it took me 40 minutes to do it the first time... LOL! I was fine with the injections though. Maybe it's the thought of being able to control the needle with the injections. Here are a couple more suggestions since testing is so important.

1) make sure to use only the sides of the fingers and use both sides (dont use the middle of the finger)

 

2) Make sure the lancet device is set at the proper setting (too deep will cause soreness)

 

3) I relly like BD's lancets and meter as I said above (it's the one that comes with the pump form MiniMed if you get one) These strips take such a small amount of blood and the lancets are so thin it's incredible.

 

4) try to determine where the soreness is coming from (i.e. the lancet itself or squeezing the finger to get the blood) and work from there. My fingers were sore for about a month but have gotten better with the above methods (and thank god because I went from testing 2X daily to 4+ times with the pump)

 

5) try to maybe test your BG with her sometimes so she doesn't think she's the only one who has to go through the "pain"

 

Good luck.

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Eri's mom

That's awesome advice!!!

 

TY!!!

 

We use both the Accucheck compact and the BD Logic...I always use the BD lancet though. We use the sides of her fingers...usually on the 2 setting...she, too, likes the BD lancet the best.

From time to time I will check my sugar, and my other two kids. They said my youngest may be "brewing" diabetes b/c she had a few random higher readings(like in the 2 and 3 hundreds)...after waking up in the morning.

She's seen me as low as 42...but I have never been dx'd w/ any type of diabetes.

 

When she takes her sugar, there is just so much attitude involved...I know it must not be a pleasant thing at all...but I want her to realize that it is a very important part of her life to keep her body healthy.

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lgvincent

I like the Accu-Chek SoftClix lancet device. It usually doesn't hurt much but it does leave red holes in my fingers.

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Jon

Hi Eri's Mom! I am a single father trying to raise a diabetic boy. He was dx'd when he was 7, he is 13 now, so I know exactly what you are going through. My son's bg was all over the place, and I had the same problem getting him to test and take shots. He would even lie and tell me he tested just to keep me off his back. I am always having to check up on him. I don't know what type of insulin your daughter is on, but most of our problems were because of NPH. Trying to schedule your life around insulin peaks can be very difficult. Once I convinced the doctor to switch him to Lantus, our whole lives changed. His doc tried to talk me out of it, because it means an extra shot, but I insisted and after a few months of adjustment, he is under good control. His A1c went from 14 to 8 in less than 6 months.

 

Your daughter is the only one in the family who has to test and take shots, so it must seem very unfair. She needs to spend time around other diabetic kids her own age so that she understands that she is not the only one. Diabetic summer camp is great for that. They teach them that diabetes is part of their life, but it doesn't have to ruin their life.

 

As far as long term problems, kids can't see past tomorrow. If you tell a kid that he/she is going to lose their foot in 5 years, that might as well be 500 years. What works better for me is incentives. If he keeps his bg in a certain range, or even if he tests regularly, he gets a prize. That prize can be something sweet to eat, or a new toy, or a pack of trading cards. Whatever motivates your daughter is worth it. The other kids may be jealous that they don't have that option, but tell them that it is just too bad for them that they can't be diabetic like their sister.

 

I wish you the best of luck! And I know how you feel. Hang in there!

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Eri's mom

Thanks for the advice and input Jon!!!

 

I will have to discuss Lantus w/ her endo this month...she is on NPH and a sliding scale of humalog now. It's a pain. She, too, lies and said she took her reading, but, she forgets that the time and date are on the read out.

That is GREAT that your sons A1c went down so much!!!

 

I've tried numerous times to have her around other kids w/ diabetes, and she recluses...she dis-associates herself from them.

The girl is just STUBBORN...

 

I'll have to try that reward system w/ her again. Maybe now she'll appreciate it more.

 

Again, thanks so much for the advice!!!

 

Have a good one... :)

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PepsiLvr

Hello,

 

I was on Lantus before my pump and it worked great... for 24 hours like they say. I almost hesitate to post this here because I don't want to give anyone ideas but it has been posted here before that children will use the control solution to fake their test. My advise would be to take it away before they discover what they can do with it. Not hard to detect though when you expect readings to be all over and for some "odd" reason they all happen to be in the control soulution range :) .

 

Again, good luck and I know that she will eventually appreicate everything you are doing for her. She is lucky to have a parent like you.

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Eri's mom

Thank you so much!!! That honestly does make me feel better...I just hope she does realize that everything I am doing for her is for her best interest and health :)

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Lorna

I might be talking nonsence, and even if I am not, I don't know how much it would cost, but to deal with the bruising problem, is their not wrist watch thing you can get so that she can monitor her bgs without testing. As for the being angry with the diabetes, that will probably come and go with time. (Or at least it does with me, usually sparked by a trivial event)

 

Is their any way you could get her to spend some time with other diabetic kids without realising that they are diabetics, until after she has already spoken to them and realised they are OK as people?

 

Good Luck!

 

PS Jon, glad to hear your kid is doing better!!!

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Eri's mom

Hi there...

I've asked about the watch, and her doc and endo isn't too impressed w/ it. We've tried every glucometer just about...she's like me, those dang veins...ugh!!!

Has anyone heard anything more on the tester they have that you test w/ your ear? On the JDF walk last year they mentioned something about it, but I haven't heard anything since. At least her appt. w/ her endo is this month...maybe he'll know...

 

I think that's a good idea...not letting her know that there are other kids w/ diabetes, etc...maybe she's getting older and more mature now to deal with the situation...and I'm seriously looking into a diabetes camp for this summer. Enough is enough w/ her...it's time for her to get over the anger and jealousy of her brother and sister not having to deal w/ what she is and take complete control.

 

Thank you so much for the info!!!

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Eri's mom

Hi again...

I was just wondering if anyone gets those little red bumps on their arms and legs, sometimes face? Eri's always had them on her arms...but just the past week or so, she got some on the top part of her thighs, and they almost look like ant bites b/f the poison gets to the top(good ol' red ants here in FL)...she wasn't bitten by any ants...these things have just "popped" up and they are weird. I know that the red bumps on her arms and face are from dry skin, but the ones on her legs are totally different.

 

I called her endo b/c she has a field trip to Disney for her 5th grade thingy...it's a reward thing for gaining so many AR points(accelerated reader)...and I asked if I could reschedule...I'd even go to Tampa, and they said no way...too booked, we'll see you in July. I was trying to explain that I didn't care WHAT time we got in, she's been experiencing a LOT of high readings, and the nurse just said, well, take her to her pediatric doctor or the ER. I was kind of annoyed b/c she hasn't been seen since November...oddly enough, her dad rec'd 3rd degree burns to his face and hands and I had to be in the ER w/ him on the date of her last appt. They schedule her a year in advance (the day Eri was diagnosed, there were 11 other kids...THAT DAY...who were dx'd.).

I understand some of the fault lies w/ me....but still...you'd think they'd give advice or have the doctor or his nurse call back. It's been quite frustrating. I'm figuring out her own new regimine, and it seems to be doing somewhat better....at least readings in the 230's when she wakes up now, although yestersday she was 453. UGH....venting here...sorry about that. It's either have her give up her trip that's she literally busted her butt on to make sure she got it for MAYBE 15 minutes w/ the doctor, or just wait until July. I mean, I want her to see the doc, but I also want her to know that what she did to recieve this honor of being able to go(not even half the class got it)...and to go.

OK...I'll shut up now...I'm a notorious rambler:eek:

 

Thanks for listeniing...

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Lorna

I'm not sure if this is the same thing, but I had red lumps on my feet before I was diagnosed. The skin specialist said they were nothing to worry about though.

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Eri's mom

Thanks, Lorna...they finally went away :)

 

I'm still having some problems w/ her....the testing part. I'm getting beyond frustrated w/ her. She's so vicioius!!!

 

The new middle school she is going to does not have an R.N....but they do have health room aides...and, as I was told, at least she's a lot closer to the hospital since they aren't allowed to inject any insulin for her, etc.

 

I'm waiting to hear about the mini med pump. I'm hoping that will be a BIG help, but she's already complaining that it will be obvious. She's actually a very active kid, and I tell her it won't be too noticable. Hopefully she won't give me a problem...I REALLY sound like the adult here, huh?

 

I am so sorry for venting...I'm just so sick of seeing her fight me and everyone on this whole issue. I don't want to see her have to deal w/ any long term affects...have her go through what my mom has been dealing w/ concering her heart, etc.

She has seen blindness firsthand in the family, we've seen dialysis w/ family, and she see's how bad the T2 has affected my dads feet. She just does NOT care. I know a lot has to do w/ the age, but, as I posted somewhere, I think some of her anger may be coming from her dad's side of the family who has told her to her face that they won't have her overnight, etc, b/c she has diabetes and they are afraid of it and won't take the time to learn about it. Maybe that's why she's being so dang stubborn about it?

 

OK...I'm just venting and rambling....so sorry!!!

Thanks for listeing!!!

God bless :)

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Mick

ATTENTION--LISTEN UP!!!

Your daughter is rushing headlong into disaster, with as much heedless speed as possible, and you, as her parent and the responsible adult, should be doing something about it other than merely observing it--YOU are in charge, not her! You are not supposed to be her friend, you are supposed to be the boss--You Make her do What You have decided is best for her--this is a question of her very survival--the behavior you are tolerating in Eri verges on negligence on your part. Her control, at the age of 10, can NOT be left up to her discretion--it is up to you to enforce compliance. I've been a type 1 for 39 years, since I was a child. I've been a school teacher for 29 years--we as adults do not allow children to run the show, it's overall bad policy. "She's stubborn" is no excuse, merely a description of her bahavior and your excuse for not controlling it. She tests, period--she tests on her bruised fingers as many times a day as necessary to get a handle on her patterns and keep her levels reasonable. You MUST put demands on her, and then make them stick with consequences she respects. I've raised 2 stubborn children--headstrong, willful and smart. My kids do not lie to me--because they know they can't. They'll avoid me, trying to avoid confronting me with a potential lie, because they can't tell that lie. Eri's easy ability to lie to you is a symptom of a damaged relationship and uncertain parenting on your part. It is time for some "Tough Love". This parenting thing is not for the faint of heart, not for wimps and weaklings. It's a very challenging and demanding job. You've got to DO YOUR JOB, your daughter's very life depends upon that.

 

You won't like it--it'll make you a villian. SHE won't like it--she'll feel tortured. Nobody said this was going to be easy... When I was diagnosed, in 1965, I complained to my mother that "It's not fair!" The huge needles I had to boil on the stove every morning and night to sterilize, the pain of the 22 gauge needle, the hassle of having to test my urine twoce a day by boiling it in a test tube with some chemicals. The utter control of my eating, all my siblings eating whatever they wanted, my foods all weighed and measured out... "It's not fair!" My mother told me, Honey, nobody ever sasid it was going to be fair." No. How true. My late mother's wise words continue to help me cope.

 

But to get this far, Eri must take care of herself, which means YOU must take care of her. She is just too young to be making this decision to refuse adequate treatment (which is what her care seems to have devolved to, in effect...) and begin to die. She can make that decision when (and if) she turns 21, but for now, it's not her's to make. Are YOU willing to make that decision--a slow, debilitating, rather gruesome death in five or ten years? Years filled with slow decline, you nursing your invilid young adult child to an early grave? CUZ, that's what your lack of power in this situation is a predictor of. I'm very sorry to be so brutal here. I know young diabetics who have continued to lie to themselves and take the easy path--or, should I say, KNEW, for death comes early to them, dead in their 20s', of heart and kidney failure, missing feet and legs, blind, debilitated, elderly and in pain. Your daughter is already well on this death march. You can stop it, by taking charge. It Is Not Easy. This disease is not easy, and it never gets any easier. BUT, with hard work, self-sacrifice and supreme self-control, mastery can be gained and success achieved. TOUGH LOVE!! Get going, do this for her!

 

Much love and luck,

Michael

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Eri's mom

Thanks for the info Michael :)

 

I see you're also a fellow Buffalonian....although I am now in FL, but was just there last month.

 

Anyhow...thanks for your info....I don't let her get away w/ not taking her sugar...she is a vicious little thing and I really don't care how vicious she gets as long as I get her bg. What I was saying was that I want HER to play more of a role in it, not just me. I'm doing everything I can...watching her...what she eats/drinks, counting carbs, watching her play, exercise, taking her bg and giving her shots(she'll do that w/ me standing right over her)...she does and can count her own carbs, draw her own insulin, give herself her own shot and take her own bg. It's a matter of me fighting w/ her over taking her bg.

I, too, believe in tough love. She gets grounded for not complying....and of course she's stubborn....but really, how many kids aren't?

 

I was basically just venting ... I would NEVER let anything happen to my child(ren)...especially if I could/can prevent it.

 

Thanks for your reply and have a great day!!!(hear it supposed to be nice up there today)

 

God bless...

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lgvincent

Sadly, I don't know what my blood sugar was like when I was that age because we didn't have the ability to check it back then (although I think we may have been aware of fire, I'm not really sure) so I have no idea what to tell you. However, I do remember having lots of insulin reactions. Is it possible that an increase in the long-acting insulin may be needed to help with the problem?

 

As far as the bumps, I'm not sure about that either but I've developed several rashes in the last 2 years or so and the skin is a reddish color. I've been using Aristocort A and it's been very helpful in getting rid of the rash. I think the stuff is fairly expensive but can't recall.

 

I went through a period of trying to resist the disease too. I tried to avoid taking injections and tried to eat whatever I wanted but I quickly realized that I had to cooperate with the disease if I wanted to live. Perhaps your daughter is going through something similar right now.

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Lorna

Is the fact that her dad's family will not have her over night possibly something that you could play on- ie they won't have her at the moment, but if she could show them that she really understands her own diabetes and can take control of it they might?

 

As for the pump being too obvious, has she actually seen how small they are these days, and how easily they can be hidden under clothes? If not, she might com around to the idea when she does- all the modern ones I've looked at are smaller than cell phones!

 

Good Luck!

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am1977

I think Eri's Mom is doing the best she can with the situation. I don't even know how I would handle it being in her shoes. Trying to manage my own diabetes is tough, but managing someone else's, well that maybe even tougher. As much as I agree with Mick about letting Eri know who is boss, I think ultimately Eri is the one who is going to have to take the responsibility for herself. Of course, I understand that her mom should not just idly let things happen...she should definitely lay down some ground rules and consequences, but I don't think constantly batteling over this is going help anyone. Usually, that just makes someone more resistant to change and more rebellious.

 

I don't know how exactly to help you with this, but I have a few ideas. How about having a conversation and then drawing up a contract? In it you lay down some rules for her to follow meaning: how many times and what times she test and recording it, have her keep a food journal of what she is eating, whether she gets exercise, her injection schedule and amounts of insulin she injects, etc. You could have her keep a record of some or all of these things. Here is the clincher, she probably will say if she does these things what does she get in return- well, you could say that you will agree to get off her back and if she follows these terms of the agreement you will buy her something she has been asking for for awhile. I think at age 10 or 11 bribes still work, lol :D I would suggest you say that you will try this for a week or two (not too long, b/c if she is not taking care of herself, you don't want something serious to happen), but if she doesn't abide to these rules, then she must agree to let you take over her testing and whatever else you decide upon. Then, like a contract, I would have you both sign sealing the deal, so to speak.

 

Another suggestion might be to go with Eri to a therapist and talk about these issues. It might be good to get someone neutral and someone outside the family to listen and give you ideas and suggestions on what can be done to improve things. As you may know, I have my own family issues regarding my diabetes, and I am seriously considering seeing someone myself. I think anyone dealing with this kind of situation can benefit from this and it is nothing to be ashamed of.

 

I really hope that things improve between yourself and Eri. I think she is a very lucky girl to have you.

 

Take care.

 

PS> I forgot one more thing, I read this article off a different message board (very sad). Maybe you can print this out for her and have her read it...maybe she will see that there are very bad consequences if you do not take care of yourself. In this case the mother is mostly responsible, but at least she will see that people her age can die from this disease.

Here it is:

Mom charged with murder in death of diabetic daughter

By Jen Lawson

 

LAS VEGAS SUN

 

The mother of an 11-year-old diabetic girl who died because her insulin level dropped too low (or her blood sugar was extremely elevated)was charged with murder Thursday.

 

A doctor told Metro Police investigators that if Cheryl Botzet had sought medical care for her daughter, Ariel, the girl would not have died, the arrest report notes.

 

Police and prosecutors allege Botzet neglected Ariel.

 

"Under the statute if a child dies as a result of abuse or neglect it can be considered murder," District Attorney David Roger said. "This wasn't a one-incident case, this happened over a long period of time."

 

However, Herb Sachs, Botzet's attorney, called the murder charge "absolutely ridiculous" and said Ariel died as a result of her illness.

 

"If you read the (police paperwork) it says she had malice aforethought," Sachs said. "My client did not sit down in a chair and think, 'I want to kill my daughter.' "

 

Botzet, a union laborer who works on an on-call basis, was expected to surrender this morning to Metro Police, Sachs said.

 

"She is tremendously upset by this," he added.

 

Ariel, who had Type 1 or juvenile diabetes, died Feb. 9 at University Medical Center of diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition involving an acidifying of the blood caused by insulin deficiency.

 

An autopsy showed the condition was a result of chronic medical neglect.

 

Dr. Alan Rice, a pediatric endochronologist, told investigators that Ariel's type of diabetes was easily controllable with a balanced diet and regular doses of insulin, the police report says.

 

For Ariel to have ketoacidosis, she must not have been receiving proper levels of insulin, probably for several days, Rice told police.

 

Ariel was diagnosed with diabetes when she was three years old, and Cheryl and Ariel's father, Randy Botzet, received training on how to monitor and control her disease, the arrest report notes. Cheryl and Randy Botzet are in the process of divorcing.

 

Diabetic ketoacidosis can be mistaken for a cold or flu, the report says, and parents of diabetic children are instructed that if their child appears ill that immediate medical attention should be sought.

 

Rice told police Ariel was last in his office in April 2003. He told investigators that even when a diabetic child is receiving perfect care the child should be checked by a doctor every three months, and blood sugar readings should be done at least four times a day.

 

When Ariel was seen by Robert Lynn, a nurse practioner in Rice's office, Botzet told him her daughter was "a new diabetic," the report says. Lynn gave Botzet a training session on how to manage her daughter's disease, according to the police report.

 

Lynn became concerned after getting phone calls from a nurse at Laura Dearing Elementary School where Ariel was a student indicating Ariel was getting "inconsistent" care from her mother, the report says. He set up several follow-up appointments with Botzet but she allegedly cancelled them.

 

Botzet told investigators she and Ariel moved to Colorado in April 2002 to receive care from a diabetes educator "who ran a very good illness management program." They returned to Las Vegas that December.

 

Clark County school records show Ariel was absent from school 26 times between December 2002 and July 2003. She was absent 17 times in the 2003-2004 school year.

 

During her absences from school there is no record through insurance billing records that Botzet took Ariel to the doctor, the report says.

 

Botzet told the school nurse that she was managing Ariel's illness at home and didn't want the girl's blood-sugar levels to be tested, the report says. The nurse began having Ariel come to the nurse's office to test her own blood sugar levels.

 

The logs from the nurse's office show that during the 2002-2003 school year, if Ariel's blood-sugar levels were too high, Botzet would come to school to give her a shot, the police report says.

 

But through that school year and into the next, the report says, Botzet stopped coming to the school altogether. By October 2003, each time Ariel called to tell her that her blood-sugar was too high, Botzet allegedly told her to drink water, do some exercises and return to class.

 

In January 2003 the nurse called Child Protective Services regarding Ariel's care. An investigator conducted a home visit and found that Botzet had insulin and proper supplies, and Ariel said she was receiving good care from her mother.

 

CPS opened a new investigation in June 2003 based on a different complaint. Officials asked Botzet to submit to a drug test and methamphetamine was found in her system, the report says.

 

Botzet denied using drugs and a second test conducted a week later showed no illegal drugs.

 

The police investigation showed that Rice ordered two vials of insulin for Botzet in August 2003 but they were never picked up from the pharmacy.

 

Two days before Ariel died, Botzet brought her into a University Medical Center Quick Care clinic and the medical staff determined the girl was suffering from severe dehydration and diabetic ketoacidosis.

 

She was transferred to UMC but had already lapsed into a coma, the report says. Efforts to revive her failed and she was pronounced dead.

 

Botzet told investigators she had given her daughter insulin in the days leading up to her death. Four days before the death, she had called Rice's office and said she had run out of insulin and received a perscription.

 

Botzet said she didn't take Ariel to the doctor more often because when she called she was placed on hold for too long, the report says.

 

She admitted to not checking Ariel's blood sugar levels four times a day as required by the doctor.

 

When asked about the police allegations that Botzet was not giving Ariel proper care, Sachs, her attorney, said, "Proper care is what one thinks proper care is."

 

"My investigation showed she did what was required of her with a diabetic daughter. She tested her and gave her shots," he said.

 

Sachs said Botzet planned to plead not guilty to the murder charge.

 

"She is being over-charged," he said. "I don't think any charges are proper."

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Lorna

I agree with you that she is doing her best, and I also realise how difficult this is. I think also that probably this will only resolve itself when Eri understands why these measures are necessary, therefore discussion is the way to go.

 

Good Luck!!!

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Eri's mom

Thanks Igvincent, Lorna and Am1977 :)

 

I really am trying to get Eri to realize the whole ordeal. Like I said, we do discuss it...it doesn't help that I have her dad who sometimes tells me to back off...but I don't think I should back off at all...and don't...b/c it is so important for her health and wellbeing.

 

As for her dad's parents...they don't even want to learn about it. It's just something that makes her different. I mean...to me she is a normal kid who just has a LOT more resonsibility to herself to own up to...she's active in sports, life, etc...does great in school...but, b/c of diabetes...they see her as not "normal"...and a scare to them(they are divorced by the way)...b/c they don't and can't understand it. At least my sister in law wants to learn on how to help her take care of her so she can have her visit for a week or so in the summer.

 

I actually came home yesterday from the store w/ yet ANOTHER book and magazine on diabetes and she, of course, became angry w/ me...BUT, she DID read the magazine. She also read about that 11 yo girl who died and who's mom was being charged w/her murder(ty Am1977 for that article!!!)...I am hoping and praying that she is FINALLY coming around. I mean, it's been 4.5 yrs and she is getting ready to start middle school, so it's time for HER to be in more control as I help and keep watch over her.

 

TY for listening :)

have a great day!!!

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Mick

Middle school is the time when most kids have the least amount of control and responsibility, and the most rebellion. the least sense and the most peer pressure... It's a complete mine field. My little one is just finishing Middle School, and good riddance to that school-we're hoping high school is better, cuz how much worse can it get? (Don't answer that--My daughter went from bad in MS to worse in HS...!)

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