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Shooter

Son's fasting level 110!

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Shooter

I have been monitoring my son's fasting level these past few days and it is at 110. He is a very active boy, but not lately due to school schedules (he goes year-round/friends go on a traditional calender) so he has pretty much been playing video games these past two weeks until his friends are out on spring break.

 

He had a physical a couple months ago but no blood drawn and never has had blood drawn. He has always been in perfect health and his weight is proportionate to his height, though he is small (4'11''-90lbs). I asked his pediatrician if we should be concerned about diabetes since he does guzzle down soda. The doctor said no. Be concerned if he starts losing weight.

 

Should I be concerned?

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sweetcheeks

I personally would be concerned, I feel that the fullflavored soda's played a BIG part in my diabetes, each can clearly has 10 tsp of sugar in it. Not saying it causes diabetes, but it doesnt help matters any.

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samsmom

I would just watch it for a while and see what happens. My son's endo told us that if you are catching diabetes early, the first thing to go is the 2hr after meal number..she said that the fasting is the last thing to go south!! Do some random tests on him and see what kind of numbers turn up. If his thirst get excessive then take him in to the dr. I have had people ask me just what exactly "excessive" thirst is and I tell them that it is an insatiable thirst, the kid will guzzle water and it is very noticeable....my son was climbing the counter and sticking his mouth under the faucet.......watch for weight loss...If your son objects to being pokes, buy some glucose sticks and have him dip his urine....if there is color change it means glucose in the urine and you need to call the dr...

 

shannon

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HollyB

I'm curious -- did you test his blood sugar because you notice he's been drinking a lot of soda, or what prompted you? You say he's in "perfect health" but there must have been something that worried you?

 

All available research shows that sugar in your diet does not cause Type 1 diabetes -- the type children most commonly get. So don't worry that he's drinking soda (at least not in terms of diabetes -- maybe in terms of his teeth and overall diet).

 

If he's constantly thirsty, though, that's something to watch. Would he drink just as much if the soda disappeared from the house and there was only water? Also, see if his energy level bounces back once his friends return. I know from experience it's hard to gauge weight loss in a growing boy -- they sometimes shoot up and get really skinny from growth, not illness -- but a combination of low energy, constant thirst and a lot of peeing could be warning signs.

 

110 is the upper end of normal. In a kid who felt well and showed no other signs, it wouldn't worry me at all.

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SueM

If nothing else I would be concerned about his teeth soda diet or full sugar is the best thing out to rot teeth.

In all honesty though the only person to say if your son has diabetes is his Dr no one here can make a diagnoses.

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cheryl

Well, what I do with my kids is let them have sprite once a month so I am not the mean one eyed devil monster since, my step kids are allowed to drink soda like water at whosever's house I had to come with some sort of level balance, so I buy a 12 pack once a month and when it goes oh well better luck next month is all I say to my kids and my step kids. Also I heard that you should not give children caffenated beverages till after they are 8 or 9 because this stunts there growth for some reason. I have worried about my kids developing diabetes like I have but, honestly there is nothing we can do to prevent type 1 as of yet, but I have always been a stickler with dairy products especially milk, I know they did a test a while back on kids and allergies to milk that could of possibly formed the antibodies to cause type 1 but this was done a while back and I got blasted on another forum because this test came back inconclusive, but I still got my personal feelings on it. So I have always given my children as babies breastmilk or soy formula and I still buy soy for the kids I mean they drink milk too, but I am more about soy in my house, don't know if it has helped so far but they are still fine.....and it don't hurt. OH and one more note, I was not allowed soda as a child and I got diabetes at 12 so that is something else to think about, I was totally close to a vegetarian diet and what not growing up after the age of 5 and I still got this at 12 so who knows all I know is that I was fed milk and my brother's weren't and they are fine and i am the one with diabetes lol........so that is why I do what I do, not that it means anything but it is my piece of mind.

 

anyway now that I have blabbed, I honestly don't think soda is going to cause type 1 diabetes, but if it is caffenated it will stunt growth......just be cautious and just do what I do test there sugars once a week fasting if it is above 126 then it is time to make a dr's appointment for further testing....

 

Cheryl

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Shooter

I just tested him two full hours after he ate lunch and his reading was 138. Holly, you asked if I tested him because he drinks alot of soda? That was exactly the reason. But if soda is not a culprit then I should not worry.

 

Sue, thanks for the reminder about the teeth. They (I have 2 sons) get 2 check-ups a year and so far so good. They have never had a cavity or any other gum or teeth problems. Their next check-up is June.

 

I will test him for a few more days. He doesn't mind getting stuck, as a matter of fact he finds it very interesting. Thank you all for your help. I will keep you posted.

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DeusXM

Would say it's doubtful. 110 isn't high by any stretch of the imagination and children tend to have a wider range of BG readings, if memory serves correctly.

 

I don't mean to sound harsh but if there aren't any symptoms, give the kid a break. There's no prizes for catching T1 before it becomes symptomatic and it's just a lot of extra worry for both of you.

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HollyB

That was actually the other thing I was going to say. If he does just happen to be in early stages of Type 1, there's nothing you can really do about it now. No sense getting him worried about something that at this points seems quite unlikely to happen.

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someone

I don't think you have anything to worry about. 110 is perfect and 138 is normal for after a meal.

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wiseguy

Although it doesn't appear that you should be overly concerned at this time, nobody can fault you for being a conscientious parent. It would be a good idea to steer your son away from the sugar laden soft drinks, especially if there is a family history of diabetes.

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someone
Although it doesn't appear that you should be overly concerned at this time, nobody can fault you for being a conscientious parent. It would be a good idea to steer your son away from the sugar laden soft drinks, especially if there is a family history of diabetes.

 

I would guess you are referring to type 2 diabetes?

 

1. He is not overweight

2. He is still young

 

The chances of developing type 2 diabetes are EXTREMELY low.

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Funnygrl

110 fasting is clearly abnormal. Deus- kids generally tend to run lower than adults.

 

That being said- meters are not always right on in terms of accuracy.

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wiseguy
I would guess you are referring to type 2 diabetes?

 

1. He is not overweight

2. He is still young

 

The chances of developing type 2 diabetes are EXTREMELY low.

The sugar laden soft drinks are not good for anyone and are certainly not part of a healthy diet. You cannot start learning to live a healthy lifestyle at too young an age. I wonder how many type 2 diabetics on this forum had an EXTREMELY low chance of acquiring the disease. The chance of becoming diabetic is not EXTREMELY LOW ENOUGH for anyone.

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sweetcheeks

actually there's more of a chance he'd get type 2 than type 1, since the majority is type 2, IMO

 

to me type 1 is a hit or miss type thing, either it works correctly or it doesnt, and we all know type 1 rarely has anything to do with genetics, not saying it doesnt but its rare that it does and only 5 to 10% of population has type 1

 

that means 90-95% has type 2. Regardless of the what they weight.

 

More and more children are becoming type 2 diabetics at an earlier age.

 

Its something that doesnt hurt to keep a check on from now and then, in the same time not to be obsesive about.

 

And its great that you just randomly test as a parent. Doesnt hurt the child one bit. I randomly test my husband just to keep an eye on him. But this could be no more than just a DP type thing too, thats why its good to test at other times just not fasting. I probably wouldnt take no more readings than a couple a week, just to get info for doctors just in case there is a checkup in the near future.

 

I hope the child doesnt get it, but kudos for you for being concerned parent.

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Funnygrl

I've heard of type 1 onsetting slow, especially if it's caught early. I read a blog of someone who has type 1 and her daughter does also. Her daughter takes a unit of insulin a day and has had diabetes since October now.

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DeusXM
110 fasting is clearly abnormal.

 

No it's not, it's at the higher end of 'normal'. Children also tend to run at higher BGs too - that's part of the reason why A1C targets for children tend to be more flexible than those for adults.

 

Can I be blunt here? I really wish people with diabetes would stop testing the blood sugar of people in their family. It doesn't ever prove anything and it causes unnecessary panic whenever there's a reading over 5.5mmol/l. Seriously, if you're actively looking to diagnose someone with T1 (and I'd ask why on earth you'd want to do that anyway), then wait until they're symptomatic. There's no benefit in getting someone on insulin when they're right in the preliminary stages - you'll just give them loads of hypos because they're guaranteed to cock it up, since their pancreas will be only partially 'off' and it'll give them a nightmare honeymoon period.

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Funnygrl

A normal fasting reading is defined as one under 100. HOWEVER, with the range of accuracy home meters have, it could easily be under 100.

 

Children are allowed to have high a1cs simply because a1c isn't generally measured until diabetes is already diagnosed, and running higher is acceptable for children because they can't report and promptly treat hypoglycemia on their own.

 

I agree with you on the not testing people (especially children) randomly to look for trouble.

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DeusXM
Children are allowed to have high a1cs simply because a1c isn't generally measured until diabetes is already diagnosed, and running higher is acceptable for children because they can't report and promptly treat hypoglycemia on their own.

 

Children are also allowed to have higher heart rates and higher blood pressure levels than adults too. Not because it's medically 'safer', but because their bodies are different. They're also allowed to have a wider range of BGs, for much the same reason.

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Erin

I wouldn't stress about a few high-ish numbers for your son... Any number of things could have caused it (him drinking soda when you didn't know... or him having dirty hands seem plausible)

 

If he starts drinking A LOT of drinks (particularly sugary ones) and loosing weight, going to the bathroom a LOT... then go to the doctor ASAP.

 

Yes... drinking lots of soda can contribute to developing Type 2 diabetes DOWN THE ROAD, but very few children who are not obese develop that type of diabetes. Right now in your son's development Type 1 is the risk, and he does not have Type 1 right now.

 

I think catching T1 in the preliminary stages is a FANTASTIC idea. I was diagnosed after a routine follow up to kidney surgery... I think my bg was 180 or so at the time. I had a beautiful honeymoon period while taking very low amounts of insulin, and never had to experience that wonderful thing called DKA.

 

That said, I wouldn't have liked having my BG tested all the time, or having my mother obsessed about my potential diabeticness. I plan on checking my kid's urine for sugar of order of once a month. That is, once I have kids. Normal kids blood glucose fluctuates, and I don't want to obsess over those normal fluctuations... but pretty much the only reason to have sugar in your urine is diabetes.

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Funnygrl
Children are also allowed to have higher heart rates and higher blood pressure levels than adults too. Not because it's medically 'safer', but because their bodies are different. They're also allowed to have a wider range of BGs, for much the same reason.

Children definitely run higher heart rates, but I've never heard of a child running a higher bp. But that is getting off topic for now.

 

Deus, I think our opinions on this matter differ simply because I was diagnosed WAY earlier than I would have been because I had a glucometer and could test at home. And I feel that earlier diagnosis helped me to have a longer honeymoon, and avoid DKA.

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SueM
A normal fasting reading is defined as one under 100. HOWEVER, with the range of accuracy home meters have, it could easily be under 100.

 

Children are allowed to have high a1cs simply because a1c isn't generally measured until diabetes is already diagnosed, and running higher is acceptable for children because they can't report and promptly treat hypoglycemia on their own.

 

I agree with you on the not testing people (especially children) randomly to look for trouble.

 

You are joking arn't you? I could tell my Mum at the age of 5 I was low and also ask for something to eat to correct it. I am not unusual either most kids know when they are low. Parents just have to listen and understand a childs terms I used to tell my Mum I was funny in the head(no rude comments please)

 

It has always been the case that Childrens bs are higher then an adults. That is why a childs A1c's target is higher then an adults.

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Funnygrl

I guess this is just one place where I'm gonna have to agree to disagree.

 

I'm not saying that the original poster should be stressing. It was a home meter. I could be any one of things. However, a lab drawn glucose any pediatrician would probably recommend further monitoring at the very least. And of course, everyone has flucks. Hence the "one two occassions" stipulation to diagnosing pre-diabetes.

 

In school, and in all my reading on diabetes I've never heard of children's glucose levels naturally running higher. I have heard of a1c targets being higher, but only because of what I already mentioned. Sue, maybe all children aren't as good at that as you were.

 

I checked my pediatric's textbook to make sure I wasn't missing something. I only found some place that says diabetes is diagnosed over 125 on two occassions (same as adult). Nothing about pre-diabetes, or kids running higher. If anyone can find me a source, I'd really me interested in reading about it.

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Funnygrl

Ok, Appendix J. Found it!

 

Glucose (serum)

Newborn: 50-90 mg/dl

Child: 60-100mg/dl

Thereafter: 70-105 mg/dl

(Potts, Mandleco, 2007, p. 1277)

 

 

It didn't specify fasting or not.

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