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JaxTerri

Why does Insulin sting after injections?

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JaxTerri

I've been on insulin ~ 8 weeks and have gotten used to the daily injections. However, I don't understand why sometimes it stings quite a lot when the insulin enters my body. The shot doesn't hurt but the insulin stings but not all the time. I bolus 3 times daily with Apidra pen and Lantus at bedtime (2 shots in different parts of body to absorb the insulin better). Also when I run out of one vial in the middle of a shot I have to take an additional shot to complete the dosage Does anybody else have this problem. Current doses are Apidra 16/14/20 units and Lantus is 83 units.

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pjams

Terri:

Some people complain of stinging with insulin. Try a different location. I inject on side of my belly (where there is more fat) and I don't even feel the needle (31 Gauge Pen). The front or lower front of the belly is more sensitive. I guess that's why the docs use the hips or other fatty areas for shots. It is also possible that some people are more sensitive to insulin than others. I am a new user and don't have much experience.

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grace girl

Lantus is well known to have a sting. I believe it's because it's acid based. If you will draw up your lantus and let it come to room temp before injecting, it will help.

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CarrieScott
Lantus is well known to have a sting. I believe it's because it's acid based. If you will draw up your lantus and let it come to room temp before injecting, it will help.

 

Agreed.

My injections used to always hurt if I did it straight out of the fridge. Let it sit out for a while or rub it between your hands for a few seconds first.

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JaxTerri

The insulin I'm using is always at room temperature. I only store the vials I'm not using. I learned that lesson a while back before when I was on Byetta. I also give the injection at a different site each time....either belly or tops of legs.

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Lynne59

When I run out of insulin from one bottle I take it from another bottle. I never give me an extra shot. Oh, Welcome here. I know you will like it.

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Gary_W

Lantus can sting a little, even at room temperature.

 

I recently moved on to Apidra (was previously on Novorapid, but I've also done the Lilly stuff as well). Apidra definately stings a little whereas Novorapid didn't; it doesn't do it 100% of the time but it certainly has more capacity for this behaviour. For me personally it is working out as a better insulin despite the fact that it is a little less comfortable to use.

 

With the Lantus, the bigger the injection the worse the sting in my experience (used to be on 35u a day of Lantus, now on 18). It's rare it stings for me anymore whereas it used to more often than not with the bigger injection. Squirting it in a little slower used to help, though this may have been me kidding myself. Can't hurt to try I guess :)

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JaxTerri

I bought a Sharps container to dispose of my needles after taking my insulin. It's now getting almost full and I don't know how to dispose of it.

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grace girl

When I first started injecting, I called the local trash pick up and asked them how to dispose. They told me to start putting them into empty laundry detergent bottles and just throw them away!

I believe you can take sharps containers to your local hospital for disposal.

Every area has it's own thing about how they handle it.

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CarrieScott
Squirting it in a little slower used to help, though this may have been me kidding myself. Can't hurt to try I guess :)

 

Well then I must have been kidding myself too, because I definitely noticed a difference when I injected it slower.

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EasyType2

While using Humulin, I never had the stinging so long as it was room temp. With Lantus, I occasionally get a sting after injecting, not immediately. The exact location seems to be the determining factor.

 

As mentioned by others, warming insulin to room temp does help.

 

Several nurses have advised me to inject quickly, but I find I get less sensation of any kind by injecting slowly. Also, less "leakage".

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shockme

i'm on 10 units of lantus /day and sometimes it stings.it's not cold and i let the alcohol dry 1st,but it still stings at times...acidity in lantus...trish

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KickStart101

I've been on lots of types of Insulin and they

all stung occasionally. I don't find Lantus any

different. It only stings once in a while also

for me.

 

You could slightly knick a capilirary(sp) which

would sting but there would be a drop or two

of blood. Most of the time I think I've just

injected near a nerve and the force of the Insulin

(acidic or not) doesn't make the nerve Happy.

 

Seems to me if it was the acid in the Lantus then

it would sting all the time but it doesn't. I'm sure

it doesn't help matters though. Then again I could

be wrong. ;)

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Joe B
I bought a Sharps container to dispose of my needles after taking my insulin. It's now getting almost full and I don't know how to dispose of it.

 

I actually re-use the sharps container, they are pretty easy to open. I dump mine into a large plastic coffee container and tape it shut with packaging tape around the lid and over the top and bottom thoroughly so it will not come open, then dispose in garbage. These containers (we use Maxwell House) are very tough and should not spill.

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Bountyman
I actually re-use the sharps container, they are pretty easy to open. I dump mine into a large plastic coffee container and tape it shut with packaging tape around the lid and over the top and bottom thoroughly so it will not come open, then dispose in garbage. These containers (we use Maxwell House) are very tough and should not spill.

 

Depending on where you live...doing that is against the law. Used medical equipment is considered hazardous waste.

 

Your reference to the sharps containers being "easy" to open means that you've found a way to open something that isn't designed to be reused. Careful what you say; some people who read what you say may take what you say as something they might do as well. It's a BAD practice.

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FunDad62

I have the same problem and there is no rhyme or reason to it for me. Sometimes it's painless, sometimes I cringe and say "dayum!". Sometimes I don't see a drop of blood, sometimes it stains my shirt if I don't douuble-check. I can't figure it out. I used to keep mine refrigerated all of the time too and stopped months ago. Like you I only keep the unopened boxes in the fridge now. Didn't seem to make any difference. I get lumps in my abdomen where I inject it but not my thighs. I really try and move my injection site around a lot too.

 

I've been using vials and syringes since starting in January of 2012 but just decided to give the pens a try. Big mistake. I had no idea they had an 80 unit limit. Now I have to shoot up twice a night. I hate that. As soon as I use up the 3 months supply I'm going back to vials.

 

I see you're still displaying a Jaguar icon! Lol...I won't even wear my t-shirt these days!

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Bountyman
I've been using vials and syringes since starting in January of 2012 but just decided to give the pens a try. Big mistake. I had no idea they had an 80 unit limit. Now I have to shoot up twice a night. I hate that. As soon as I use up the 3 months supply I'm going back to vials.

 

Insulin syringes only go up to 100 units...so I'm assuming you inject between 80 and 100 units? Actually, pens have a 300 unit limit. You can redial the pen at any time that the needle is in you.

 

I get lumps in my abdomen where I inject it but not my thighs. I really try and move my injection site around a lot too.

 

Lumps can be caused by several things. The three most common are; you've missed the subcutaneous layer and are injecting into your skin; the subcutaneous layer isn't as flexible to absorption as it used to be; you're just injecting too much insulin into one spot...or a combination of any of them. Since you say you're displeased with the pen only going up to 80 units...I'll assume you inject more than 80 units at a time. I'm of the theory that more than 40 units into one injection site is too much. You might want to divide whatever your unit dose is into multiple sites...see if that cures your "lump" problem.

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FunDad62
Insulin syringes only go up to 100 units...so I'm assuming you inject between 80 and 100 units? Actually, pens have a 300 unit limit. You can redial the pen at any time that the needle is in you.

 

The Lantus web site says specifically not to redial the pen but rather do a second injection with a new needle. I know that doesn't mean you can't but I'm just going by their instructions.

 

Not sure what you mean by the pens have a 300 unit limit? Does that mean I can only get 3 doses out of each pen? I take 100 units in the evening. With the pens I'm doing 50 and 50.

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Bountyman
The Lantus web site says specifically not to redial the pen but rather do a second injection with a new needle. I know that doesn't mean you can't but I'm just going by their instructions.

 

Exactly. By design, the pen only twists out to 80 units. You'll notice that 4 of your fingers hold the complete body of the pen...and at 80 units...your thumb pretty much can't stretch any farther. Function follows form in this case. By design...they feel 80 units is pretty max for one injection...hence their suggestion not to redial. Suggesting you use a new needle is common policy for any injection. Personally, I would put the max for one injection at 40 units, or in your case, 50 and 50.

 

Not sure what you mean by the pens have a 300 unit limit?

 

You said that you didn't like that the pen had an 80-unit limit. I took that as you thinking that was a physical limit. Now you say it's a recommended limit by the manufacturer. That was confusion on my part. But still...if you're partial to injecting 100 units in one spot with a syringe...you can do that as well with a pen. You're prerogative.

 

Does that mean I can only get 3 doses out of each pen?

 

Last time I counted...100 went into 300 3 times. So, yes.

 

I take 100 units in the evening. With the pens I'm doing 50 and 50.

 

Did you do a 50/50 with the syringe as well? If you're going back to the syringe...I suggest you adopt that. You may find that with two 50-unit injections you'll have to titrate down to get the same results as one 100-unit injection. Two injection spots at the same time release more insulin because of the combined area that they cover.

 

FWIW

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patricia52

Each pen is filled with 300 units of insulin. For me that is almost a months supply of Lantus. I sometimes have to throw out a few units of Apidra. Vials and syringes are a better buy if you use a lot of insulin.

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