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PattiS

Ace inhibitors and Cholesteral medicine

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PattiS

 

Hello all, I am new to this forum.

 

I was recently told by both my Endocrinologist and regular doctor that I should go on an ace inhibitor for my blood pressure (which I guess is too high for a diabetic 148/90 or something like that) and to help my kidneys (which apparently are showing early signs of kidney problems - results from an office urine sample but I have not gotten the actual results back from the lab yet). I am not too pleased about having to go on this medication. They also feel that I should go on a cholesteral lowering medication. Again, the bad cholesteral is too high for a diabetic but apparently not too high for a non.

 

Does anyone else have to take this medication? Probably a stupid question. I am concerned about having to take MORE medication - I'm already on Synthroid, and 2 anti-depressants-Paxcil and Wellbutrin. Not to mention the insulin (using a pump).

 

Any feedback you can give me on these medications will be greatly appreciated. By the way - I am 46 and have been a type I for a little over 17 years now - my AIC's have been in the 7's - so I guess I have so so control but could be better.

 

Thank you!

Patti

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xMenace

An ACE and a Statin are pretty standard for us longer term D's. Most of us on here are on them. I am.

 

Oh, and welcome to the forum. :)

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PattiS
An ACE and a Statin are pretty standard for us longer term D's. Most of us on here are on them. I am.

 

Oh, and welcome to the forum. :)

Thanks for the reply. Just wondering if you have any side effects from these?

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Penny

Hi Patti, I take Avapro and Zocor, have for many years. I was taking Altace but it caused a cough. Xmenace is right, I think we all eventually need to take something.

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CindyO

I've been on a cholesterol lowering medication for about 10 years. I've never had high cholesterol, but as you said, it's too high for a diabetic. I started on an ACE inhibitor in Feb of this year, but had to stop because of the maddening cough. I'm now on Benicar, which is an ARB. My blood pressure was running 130/70 when I started the ACE inhibitor. My numbers are all fine now and I don't notice any side effects.

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xMenace
Thanks for the reply. Just wondering if you have any side effects from these?

 

There's an ACE cough. It hits you in the back of the throat like it's always dry. I had it a bit when I started, but I have no symptoms now. The Statins apparently have major symptoms for a very very few people. I don't know what they are; some here have described them. I have none.

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REDLAN

ACE inhibitors - most common side effect is dry cough. ARB's are better in this respect. other side effects include muscle cramps, and low serum potassium (you need to have regular blood tests to ensure that your potassium isn't dropping too low) reasonably well tolerated - drop out rate is around 20% by 5 years, due to side effects usually low blood pressure.

 

it's a very common experience to feel very strange when taking blood pressure lowering medication for the first few days - this passes very quickly.

 

statins - reasonably well tolerated by most people - side effect rates are reported to be low - however muscle pain is reported very commonly (approximately 40% of statin users - difficult to tell whether this is caused by statins or a feature of the group - i.e. mostly elderly) - other side effects can be memory problems - (not that common), and neuropathy - (statins lower cholesterol - cholesterol is essential for healty nerve cell function)

 

one to watch for in statins is rhabdomyolysis - which in english is muscle break down - damaged proteins block the kidneys causing kidney failure, and quite often fatalities. It's very rare, but if you experience severe muscle pain after taking statins, then you should discontinue them and report it to your doctor.

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BlueSky

... I am concerned about having to take MORE medication ....

The ACE inhibitor sounds like a good idea as you have high blood pressure and your kidneys are already taking strain. But the benefits of statins are extremely dubious. I think it was the Nurses study that showed that, in terms of all cause mortality, statins don't provide any benefit for women whatsoever, regardless of age or whether there has been a previous heart attack. And it is not as if your cholesterol is high anyway ...

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xMenace

There's no easy answers. As a long term diabetic I feel I have little choice but to follow my Endo's recommendations. Still, we should all research as much as we can. These may help prepare for a thorough discussion with your endo.

 

Statins: Is this cholesterol-lowering drug right for you? - MayoClinic.com

 

Statin Adverse Effects

 

Statin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Statins - drug class, medical uses, medication side effects, and drug interactions by MedicineNet.com

 

Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs

 

Log In Problems

 

Statin Treatment in Diabetes Mellitus -- Buse 21 (4): 168 -- Clinical Diabetes

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PattiS
ACE inhibitors - most common side effect is dry cough. ARB's are better in this respect. other side effects include muscle cramps, and low serum potassium (you need to have regular blood tests to ensure that your potassium isn't dropping too low) reasonably well tolerated - drop out rate is around 20% by 5 years, due to side effects usually low blood pressure.

 

it's a very common experience to feel very strange when taking blood pressure lowering medication for the first few days - this passes very quickly.

 

statins - reasonably well tolerated by most people - side effect rates are reported to be low - however muscle pain is reported very commonly (approximately 40% of statin users - difficult to tell whether this is caused by statins or a feature of the group - i.e. mostly elderly) - other side effects can be memory problems - (not that common), and neuropathy - (statins lower cholesterol - cholesterol is essential for healty nerve cell function)

 

one to watch for in statins is rhabdomyolysis - which in english is muscle break down - damaged proteins block the kidneys causing kidney failure, and quite often fatalities. It's very rare, but if you experience severe muscle pain after taking statins, then you should discontinue them and report it to your doctor.

That may be bad news because they also want me to take a cholesteral lowering medication. I have no idea what the name is though or if its a statin.

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mg_2204
There's an ACE cough. It hits you in the back of the throat like it's always dry.

 

ACE Inhibitors : Coversyl did that to me! I had to stop it.

 

Cholesterol lowering drugs : I was on Crestor for a while and now Lipitor. No side effects at all on either one.

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Fenway

I'm on Lisinopril 40mg QD for HTN. Get the occasional cough, but it's not a big deal. Have been on this med for over 10 years, I think.

 

Also on Lipitor 40mg QD for cholesterol. That's up from 10mg this time last year.

 

I have no problems taking either of these meds. Anything that will help with these chronic conditions and ease the possibility of diabetic complications is fine with me.

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TeeJaxx

I was at my Dr's on Tuesday. I asked about the lipitor. When I started it (about 5 years ago), my cholesterol was sky high, but he tells me that for the past 2 years it's been good. So I asked him if I could stop taking it. He told me that there is some recent study which says that lipitor reduces the chance of diabetics having heart attacks by about 28%. He told me to keep taking it, more so because it just gives me a better chance at NOT having heart problems.

 

He also then prescribed CONVERSYL which is an ace inhibitor.

I'm still in a dilema over that one!

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volleyball

The jury is out on the real benefits so you have to decide. I don't believe that we all will need them ever. A lot of doctors prescribe them as a "preventative" measure which isn't always a good answer. I think drugs are a good choice to get people to a normal range. Staying on them is where I differ. some times you need them, some you don't. It is dependent on you and the choices you make. Every one of us is different. Thats why testing is a good thing.

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BlueSky
..... He told me that there is some recent study which says that lipitor reduces the chance of diabetics having heart attacks by about 28%. He told me to keep taking it, more so because it just gives me a better chance at NOT having heart problems.....

I find it more usefull to convert that relative risk reduction to absolute terms. If, based on your risk factors, you have a 5 year heart attack risk of 8% (I am guessing here), taking Lipitor reduces it to 5.8% (100-28 = 72% of 8%). So you are only reducing your heart attack risk by 2.2%. And you still have a 5.8% risk of heart attack in the next 5 years. If you want to maintain this marginally reduced risk, you have to keep taking the drug for the rest of your life. Is it really worth it?

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REDLAN

if you want actual numbers...

 

the 4S trial RR -29% absolute risk reduction 3.3% over 5 years or around 0.66% per year. (secondary prevention)

 

WOSCOPS RR -21% absolute risk reduction 0.9% or 0.18% per year (mixed primary/secondary prevention)

 

EXCEL RR +150% + 0.3% over 5 years - (primary prevention)

 

The figures quoted are overall mortality figures (while statins can and do reduce your risk of heart disease, they tend to raise your risk from other things - such as violent death)

 

so if you already have heart disease and you take statins you can expect to decrease your risk of dying by around 0.5% per year (from the 4S secondary prevention trial)

 

If you don't have heart disease and you take statins, then you can expect statins to make no real difference to your risk of dying - your risk of dying from heart disease goes down as your risk of dying from something else goes up - there may be a case for primary prevention in diabetes as the risk of heart disease is higher than average - but I doubt the benefits would ever exceed the 4S trial.

 

I like the analysis done by one author on statins - he calculated (from a lives saved press release - which went if 10 million high risk people took statins then 50,000 lives would be saved each year) that if you took statins for a whole year you would on average live for 2 extra days.

 

If you took it for a life time (30 years), you could expect to live an additional 2 months.

 

puts it all in perspective doesn't it.

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DVDBear

 

 

Does anyone else have to take this medication? Probably a stupid question. I am concerned about having to take MORE medication - I'm already on Synthroid, and 2 anti-depressants-Paxcil and Wellbutrin. Not to mention the insulin (using a pump).

 

Any feedback you can give me on these medications will be greatly appreciated. By the way - I am 46 and have been a type I for a little over 17 years now - my AIC's have been in the 7's - so I guess I have so so control but could be better.

 

Thank you!

Patti

Hi Patti, I'm on a lot of the same meds you are. As far as Ace Inhibitors I was on Lisinopril for a year or so. When I was put on insulin I had a severe allergic reaction to it (the insulin). I was taken off the ace inhibitor by my allergist and switched to Diovan. She also gave me a note to give any GP I might see asking NOT to prescribe any ace inhibitor. Evidently they can magnify an allergic reaction . . . . "like pouring keroscene on a fire" is the way she described it. As long as you don't have allergy problems it shouldn't cause you any grief, though.

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