Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

FLescape

13

Recommended Posts

FLescape

I haven't posted in quite some time, I feel the need. As many of you know my insulin dependent son in now 13! He has been having major issues with transitioning to NY, school, doctors, insulin regimen, death of an uncle. Currently I am on hold, while trying to seek out some counseling for Luke, but when things seem worst is when I must not quit. Those of you who were dx'd as children, what were your greatest fears?

 

Thanks for Listening,

Margaret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SueM
Those of you who were dx'd as children, what were your greatest fears?

 

Thanks for Listening,

Margaret

Diabetes no fears at all it was just an acceptance and life went on. Mind you as I was diagnosed at the age of 4 1/2, I went through school from day 1 with no problems because diabetes was my life I was treated no differently than other children.

My worst fear was

 

Dad finding out I hadn't done my homework yet again :eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alice

At 13, my worst fear was that I would never have a boyfriend in my lifetime! Seriously, diabetes wasn't much of a drama at that time. I will say with caution, that that's about the age where teens start slowing down on the doctor appointments. (Back in the dinasaur days, we didn't need prescriptions for D supplies!)...I maybe went to see my pediatrician a couple of times...then off to college. Looking back, I would have like more encouragement to see a doctor (that I liked!)...

 

I also recommend diabetes camp if he's not "too old"...most go til about 13 or 14. I didn't go until that age and had a great time.

 

Good luck...and sorry to hear about the loss of his uncle. My family went through that last year with some of my younger relatives...it is tough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KickStart101

Diabetes was not a fear....And I'm not telling what

was...since I wasn't a Boy, it wouldn't help in your

case anyways. Sorry, Good Luck! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FLescape

Girls, homework,and the fact that Luke is waiting for the other shoe to drop, so to speak, because of past maltreatment in schools in Florida and his Uncle's death are huge contributors to his feelings and actions at this time. While I am seeking counseling, I have expressed how important it is that we, Luke, my husband and myself take care of each other because we just do not know what tommorrow may bring. I also shared, "your past is your past, your future is spotless."

 

Thanks again,

Margaret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xMenace

Kids are pretty resilient.

 

My whole point was I had no fears about diabetes at all. I wouldn't doubt that many of these fears are yours and not his, at least that's been true for us. It's tough to provide meaningful support for a teen. As mine grow older I am slowly moving away and treating them more and more like adults. It's one of the toughest jobs there is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iDream

I'm 16 and was diagnosed at 15......I think I was most worried about getting everything set and being good about everything (checking, eating, etc) I was also worried about what people would think, in reference to those who think you get diabetes because you are overweight (not entirely untrue if talking about t2) .... friends will always be friends no matter what, my friends are chill about it .... it must be tough for your son being in a new state, school, new everything.....

 

where in NY?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charmed7

My son is only 9 so doesn't have the added 'teens' issue. But we just moved from CA to CT and I think that was harder for him then I expected.

 

We also had a death in the family a year ago now. I didn't think it would affect him so much, and boy was I wrong. I think children at all different ages find death a hard concept. There's the attitude of invincibility. I spend so much time assuring my son I will be there for him at all times. When his step-grandfather passed away, I think it made him think about how it could happen to anyone. He started to question both his and my mortality. He was ok with his feelings of sadness. That was easy for him to accept. It was all the other complications around that had him thinking about it. And he didn't speak out loud about it, I actually heard second hand from his teacher on a story he wrote about the situation.

 

I hope you can open up communication on either of these things that have turned your sons world upside down. I would also think he's old enough where you could ask him if there is anything you can do to help. He may not know what is troubling him the most. A counselor might do different things for him, but it's not bad if you give it a try too. Encourage him to write a story (I'm a girl and kept a diary when I was young, but kids these days could have a blog online which might help him sort out his turmoil), or you can create a memorial for his uncle, or have a get together with some of the new kids in school. Find somethings that are different about NY and somethings that are the same and go on a day trip to check it out. I don't know...just rambling. Good luck. I hope I said something that helps.

 

Charmed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.