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Charmed7

Diabetes & School

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Charmed7

I just thought I would open up discussion about Diabetes and School.

 

My son is 8, diagnosed with Type I diabetes at 4 and in third grade. He has a 504 Plan in place that needs updating for the new school year.

 

What do you do to prepare for the school year? What are your experiences with teachers and school nurses?

 

Can't wait to hear from everyone.

 

Charmed.

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Penny

My granddaughter eats lunch with an 11 year old girl who has Diabetes. She said she saw the girl testing and stopped to say "my grandmother does that". The girl said she has been doing it "all her life" and wears a pump. She told Emily "only once in awhile", the alarm goes off and she has to go see the nurse. She told her that was the "only problem about having Diabetes". I intend to make a point of getting to know this girl, it sounds like she has good control for one so young.

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iDream

I'm 16...decided not to get the 504, it really doesn't effect me enough and I don't forsee it doing so, since I have a pump/sensor....

 

I never eat school lunches, they're terrible. I figure they have about 150-200 carbs a piece, its nuts. I either have a water bottle or a bar for lunch, and sparingly a snapple and an ice cream :-)

 

I used to eat a snack in class, the teach didn't mind....when I'm bored I check my number on the sensor, look at graphs, look at daily totals.....haha. A teacher actually thought it was a cell phone once....tried to take it.

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Charmed7
A teacher actually thought it was a cell phone once....tried to take it.

 

iDream,

 

I actually heard a horror story about a girl in Highschool with a pump. The assistant principal actually removed the pump and took it away for the day. I guess the girl was very timid and did not speak up until her levels got high enough to make her sick. Iggnorance is scary.

 

I always looked at the 504 plan as protection against illness that may have him out of school for a long time. That way he wouldn't lose credit due to the absences. I also read about a teenager that was having large difficulties managing her sugars and was home sick or in the hospital a lot. Her honors teacher wasn't going to offer her any other options and was going to fail her because of the absences. The 504 plan can prevent that from happening.

 

I think the pump lessens those horror stories, but I try not to take anything for granted. I read a lot of school catastrophies and am paranoid about the whole thing. If it were up to me, I would be his teacher every year. lol. So this is my protective way of trying not to be over protective. It puts my mind at ease if I know that plan is active and the teachers/nurses etc have to follow it.

 

Charmed.

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iDream

yeah, you have to speak up about something like that.....I don't know how you can't.....at my school each teacher gets a letter in their mailbox telling them which students have what conditions, therefore they have an idea if something was to happen. as your son gets older, you will see that the 504 will act as a valid excuse to be late to classes, to get extended time for state tests, etc, its nice to have. The only reason I don't have it is because I'm almost done, so I figure another year without it won't make a difference. My experience with nurses is that they pretty much know nothing....Me "My number is 80" Them: "oh, your going low, treat that with some juice. I haven't had juice since being diagnosed nor do I ever plan to....sometimes you have to use your brain before listening to them....

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kel4han

My daughter is 7 and diagnosed at age 6 in 1st grade. I have every detail in her 504 plan. School is very accomadating. She has a pump this year, and gets half her carb count up front, then brings back lunch, or what was un-eaten for the remaining carb count and bolus. Treat days are detailed that she must have a prebolus for sweet treat days such as birthday parties etc. She will soon have an IEP as well, she has struggled with concentration and learning in the AM after breakfast time. Working on those morning high spikes. :eek:

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JTSarah

We have a 504 plan for our daughter, diagnosed at age 6, now 12. We have a meeting with all impacted caregivers at the school 2 weeks (approximate) before school starts. One tool that we use, and our school loves, is mycareconnect https://www.mycareconnect.com/default.aspx

 

This is a free website the school nurse uses to enter our daughters tests as well as those miscellaneous questions or items that come up throughout the day. As a parent, you set up the site (pretty quickly) putting in the e-mails of all the caregivers of your child. You can set up to receive text messages or e-mails any time your child or a teacher or nurse puts information on the site - believe me it is very easy to use and is a lifesaver for my wife and I as we get 4 -5 messages a day so we know how our daughter is when she gets home - the first topic of conversation doesn't have to be about diabetes. Anyway check it out.

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EeyoreButterfly

I'm a student teacher at the moment and so far have only dealt with two students with diabetes. One had Down Syndrome so everything was handled by the nurse. She simply couldn't care for it herself. The other, I don't know how everything was handled. He had a 504 that stated he had to be allowed water in class and could not be denied going to the bathroom. There may have been more, but I was just teaching an enrichment reading class for summer school at the time.

 

Now I'm in an interesting predicament. I posted this elsewhere but I am no longer allowed to test in my classroom. Although I never throw away strips or lancets at school, only the nurse's trash can is approved for hazardous waste disposal. This has actually kept me fro mtesting several times as I cannot always get down there to test.

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SuzySushi

Now I'm in an interesting predicament. I posted this elsewhere but I am no longer allowed to test in my classroom. Although I never throw away strips or lancets at school, only the nurse's trash can is approved for hazardous waste disposal. This has actually kept me from testing several times as I cannot always get down there to test.

 

I'm not sure the school can do that under the Americans with Disabilities Act. They are required to make "reasonable accommodations" which to mean would seem that you should be able to test in your workplace -- especially if you are not disposing of hazardous waste there.

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eyeofgemini

They must let you test in your classroom. It is medically neccessary and unless they have somebody else there to take over for you while you go to the nurse's office, they must accomodate.

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morrisma

I am a type 1 and used to work a week every year at an overnight 4h camp. As a counselor at camp for just that week I knew which kids in my bunk house had medical conditions and made it a point to know every diabetic in camp. Our nurse made sure we were aware of anything we might have to deal with. Can't imaging a school official being so stupid as to not understand and remove a medical device. More power than brains in that.

Mike

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EeyoreButterfly
They must let you test in your classroom. It is medically neccessary and unless they have somebody else there to take over for you while you go to the nurse's office, they must accomodate.

 

If I were on insulin or another hypo causing drug I would push the issue. I am technically only a prediabetic at this point by diagnosis. I am also not a paid employee. I am a student teacher, so I just cannot afford to press the issue. Their hearts are in the right place and when you are the low man on the totem pole you have to choose your battles. At this point I am not going to do any damage if I ignore a low or treat a false low.

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